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How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away

How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Saying 'you're not welcome here'—with spikes."


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Michael MacNeil's curator insight, August 2, 2014 8:38 AM

Lack of understanding of mental disability can lead to heartlessness. There is so much that needs to be done.

dilaycock's curator insight, August 3, 2014 3:50 AM

I'd never really taken notice, or heard of some,  of the architectural deterrents mentioned here. I can't believe that we, as a society, go to such lengths to make life even more difficult for those already struggling. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:52 PM

APHG-U7

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Picture quiz – do you know your world cities?

Picture quiz – do you know your world cities? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Some city skylines are so iconic they are instantly recognisable.

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harish magan's comment, September 10, 2013 7:09 AM
It is very interesting to explore new cities and their sky views
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:41 PM

After taking this quiz I realized I could not really identify most of these cities. I could tell some of them were European from the look of the buildings. I also thought a few more were cities in the United States but there was only Dallas. In my opinion these cities are even more spectacular than some of our major cities. 

Lorettayoung's curator insight, May 8, 2014 8:36 PM

is this ularu ?

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Re-examining the Battle of Gettysburg with GIS

Re-examining the Battle of Gettysburg with GIS | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"GIS has given us the chance to re-examine how the Civil War battle was won and lost." 


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Todd Pollard's curator insight, February 4, 2014 10:34 PM

I really like this interactive map application.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 28, 2014 1:13 PM

unit 1

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 3:14 PM

Just another of the millions of uses for GIS...

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Tips for the Google Maps Guessing Game

Tips for the Google Maps Guessing Game | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

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Nicholas Pringle's curator insight, June 3, 2013 7:44 AM

This has great potential for a education geography tool. Very creative!

fabio sousa's comment, June 3, 2013 9:00 AM
hshahda´~
Todd Parsons's curator insight, October 28, 2013 5:41 PM

Say goodbye to getting anything done...

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New York's Changing Skyline

New York's Changing Skyline | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 26, 2013 3:55 PM

I love this visualization of New York City's evolving skyline from 1876-2013.  The urban landscape of America's prominent cities has changed dramatically. 


Tags: historical,urbanarchitecture, landscape, NYC.

Louis Culotta's comment, May 1, 2013 11:32 AM
I wonder if the tallest building in the first picture is the first stage of the Brooklyn Bridge??????
Louis Culotta's curator insight, May 1, 2013 11:35 AM

if you look at the first picture...it looks like the tall building on the water could be the first stage of the Brooklyn Bridge...any suggestions to this?

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Ephemicropolis

Ephemicropolis | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

If you have over 100,000 staples, you can create an startlingly creative rendition of an urban landscape (well, Peter Root could).   It is interesting how our cultural and historical context shape what we see as a human landscape.  I can't help but think that if I lived 2,000 years ago this uneven jumbled metallic mass wouldn't remind anyone of any place they'd ever been. 

  

Tags: art, urban, landscape, unit 7 cities, historical.


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Don Brown Jr's comment, October 1, 2012 9:42 PM
This video makes me think what other simple items or objects cause us to automatically associate with modernization and urban environments today such as Styrofoam cups. It also makes me wonder how certain tools and objects can be more strongly associated with different time periods, people, cultures and environments.
Don Brown Jr's comment, October 1, 2012 9:42 PM
This video makes me think what other simple items or objects cause us to automatically associate with modernization and urban environments today such as Styrofoam cups. It also makes me wonder how certain tools and objects can be more strongly associated with different time periods, people, cultures and environments.
Don Brown Jr's comment, October 1, 2012 9:42 PM
This video makes me think what other simple items or objects cause us to automatically associate with modernization and urban environments today such as Styrofoam cups. It also makes me wonder how certain tools and objects can be more strongly associated with different time periods, people, cultures and environments.
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61 Amazing Manhole Covers from Japan

61 Amazing Manhole Covers from Japan | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Manhole covers are ubiquitous in the modern urban fabric; they are typically drab and purely utilitarian.  In Japan, municipalities take pride in the this ordinary piece of the landscape and convert them into extraordinary works of art that reflect the local people, place and culture. 

 

Tags: book review, landscape, art, urban, culture, place, EastAsia.

 


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2014 6:00 PM

This is a great take on art and the ways of celebrating Japan with touches of personal findings and ideas. These manhole covers are cheery and reflect a piece of Japan that not only tell stories, but embrace history.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 3:17 PM

While many would consider it silly to turn something as ordinary as manhole covers into pieces of art, I believe that it is an amazing way to represent the culture of a place. Different townships and neighborhoods in Japan have distinct designs that relate to that place. This acts as an artistic expression of the characteristics of that place, since the designs are often chosen and designed by the people of that place. Some covers show historical events, animals, and even religious symbolism. I would love to flip through the book and try to imagine why each place chose each design. 

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Earthscapes

Earthscapes | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The U.S. Postal Service celebrates the beauty and diversity of America's landscapes as seen from above with the Earthscapes (Forever®) stamps.Offering an opportunity to see the world in a new way, the 15 stamps are issued in 3 rows of 5, showing 3...

 

These stamps are the perfect way to decorate your letters while showing your love for the Earth and geography. 

 

Tags: images, art, landscape. 


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Iconic Skylines

Iconic Skylines | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

These skylines are not to scale, but are composite skylines to groups together the iconic representations of the particular cities into one.  Thanks to APHG teacher Ricard Giddens, here are some U.S. skylines. 


Tags: urban, Paris, London, place, tourism.


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Thomas Schmeling's comment, October 29, 2012 9:01 AM
How about one for Providence??
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The Dubai Skyline In The Fog

The Dubai Skyline In The Fog | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Now this is an amazing sight...no doubt where the main boulevard is. 


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megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 1:01 AM
Dubai a country that has developed itself. It is a country that is extremely rich and beautiful.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 9:02 PM

This is pretty cool. You can tell how  high that main strip of buildings are. Very unique 

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Images From Freeport Mine

Images From Freeport Mine | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

With the Freeport Mine strike still in the news, this photo gallery of the world's largest gold mine is an excellent set of teaching images.  For more images, maps and aerial photography of the mine see: https://www.google.com/search?q=freeport+mine&hl=en&client=firefox-a&hs=ZFo&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&prmd=imvns&source=lnms&tbm=isch&ei=ze_TTr_VAuL50gGT2qEn&sa=X&oi=mode_link&ct=mode&cd=2&ved=0CB8Q_AUoAQ&biw=1440&bih=768


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Physical Geography of Avatar

Physical Geography of Avatar | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The site is in Chinese, but the images are spectacular.  They put a glass trail on the mountain Tyanmen (Heaven's Gate), located in Zhangjiajie National Forest Park in Hunan Province, China.
It is a mountain in this park inspired the famous film "Avatar," the idea of floating mountains of Pandora.  Below is a Google image search for "Zhangjiajie National Forest Park."  Prepare to be amazed.


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Timelapse of Iceland's Midnight Sun

BEST VIEWED IN HD AND FULLSCREEN (with scaling off) Midnight Sun: A natural phenomenon occurring in the summer months north of the Arctic Circle and south of the Antarctic Circle where the sun never fully sets and remains visible 24 hours a day.

 


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Harvest 2013

Harvest 2013 | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
From grains to grapes to cabbage and many other crops the harvest season has been in full swing in the Northern Hemisphere.

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Scott Langston's curator insight, October 28, 2013 7:48 PM

An image our Grad 11 students can at least have some empthy with....

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 6, 2013 2:47 PM

Well see as how my page is called World Photography, i figurd this would be a good article/gallery to put up. Along with so georgous photos one can really see the imporance of farming on a culture and farming world wide. The gallery of photos is increadible, and with a caption to match each photo you are able to see geographilycly and cultulary where certan foods and plants are produced. This makes me feel  that cultures are all some what connected, the tobbco from your cigretts comes from mexico, and the nice wine that you drink when your out to dinner is from a vineyard in germany. Its a small idea but food is very cultualy influncing 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 2:09 PM

After reading this article it became apparent the back breaking work that these people have to endure just to stay alive and feed their family. Which is insane when you think about our society today, I dont know about you but I do not farm and do this type of work after I'm done with my school work everyday. In some places in the United States like out west they are used to some of this work but most of us do not make all of our meals and kill them in the same spot. It became apparent how much of a lifestyle this type of work is and the true dedication that people go through for themselves, family, land and economy.

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Density and Emptiness

Density and Emptiness | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In the end of 2012 I travelled to USA to experience something new. And it was something I didn't expect: emptiness and density.  'Merge' is the last part of a project series 'Empty, Dense, Merge' which explores two opposite feelings through the photos of places located in USA.  In this project two opposite places are merged into one: New York City, where, it seems like everyone wants to live there, and Grand Canyon / Death Valley, which are unlivable."


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oyndrila's comment, July 21, 2013 3:37 AM
Excellent visual resource to convey the concepts.
John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:14 PM

Great photo combining the U.S.'s great spaces with its metropolisis'.

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 9:17 PM
Amazing it almost looks lkike we, in the US, are living in a huge bowl
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Mapping Your Trips

Mapping Your Trips | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The following pictures are all embedded in this ArcGIS Online map that I created as a part of the T3G institute in Redlands CA on the ESRI campus."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 20, 2013 2:33 AM

For me exploring the neighborhoods of Redlands was incredibly nostalgic since it reminds me so much of the part of Burbank that I grew up in, but haven’t had much opportunity to visit since.  I left  Burbank, CA when I 11 and the next year the city’s landscapes became the set for the TV show “The Wonder Years.”  I was 12 just like Kevin Arnold was, and despite a serious lack of Winnie Cooper in my youth, the show still resonates with me as does the Southern California landscape.

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Exploring farms from above

Exploring farms from above | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Stunning gallery of 15 images depicting agricultural landscapes.  Shown above are cut flower fields in Carlsbad, California circa 1989."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 22, 2013 4:33 PM

"Aerial photographer Alex MacLean estimates he has spent about 6,000 hours in the sky photographing American farms.  His unique perspective depicts the dramatically changing agricultural landscape in the U.S., something he has been drawn to since he started flying nearly 40 years ago.  'I’ve been photographing agricultural lands since I started flying, in the early 1970s,' he says. 'I was drawn to the aesthetics of farmland, in part because of its natural response to environmental conditions, climates, soils and topography…A lot of what I photograph is through discovery of seeing crops, seeing patterns.' 


Tags: agriculture, landscape, images.

Mary Rack's curator insight, May 23, 2013 10:28 AM

These are really beautiful and interesting, but I wish  photos could also reveal what substances are used on the land: fertilizers, pest killers, etc. I will go to his site and see if he addresses that. 

Mary Rack's comment, May 23, 2013 10:35 AM
MacLean's http://www.alexmaclean.com/ is a rich treasure trove of beauty and information! I could lose myself in it for the rest of the day. I recommend it to all thoughtful people.
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It’s a Small (and Cartographically Incorrect) World After All!

It’s a Small (and Cartographically Incorrect) World After All! | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Ever since my first visit to to Disneyland, I was intrigued by the  the ride 'It's a Small World After All."  As a youngster, it was an opportunity to get in cool boat ride that I always regretted half way into the ride once the song was firmly chiseled into my mind.  This blog post explores the curious and fascinating geographical imaginations, the visions of folk cultures and global harmony behind this Disneyland ride.  This fabulous map charts that vision. 


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melissa stjean's comment, September 4, 2012 12:20 PM
"It's a small world" is what thousands if not millions of kids hear on this ride a year. They are driven through the continents and are greated by happy faces of the natives to that land. The ride is somewhat dumbed down for kids, showing them what "its really like" in these countries, but the truth is most of the these countries are not clean, and happy as Disney makes them out to be. Though the ride is a good step to open kids minds about the world, but when they grow up they realize that its not that small, happy world afterall.
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Tiny Capital

Created by Eirik Evjen.  The production of this video was made out of 76,940 single photos.

 

"Norway has recently reached 5 million inhabitants and the capital is growing rapidly. The city scene in Oslo is steadily thickening with taller buildings, more people and the never-ending construction sites. Being by far the most populated city in Norway with 613 000 inhabitants, most Norwegians look to Oslo as a major capital. However, if one compares Oslo to other international capitals, Oslo only ranks as the 112th largest. Oslo is indeed a major capital, just a small one…"

 

Tags: art, urban, Europe, landscape, unit 7 cities.


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:39 PM

Oslo may be small in size, but it is quickly growing and advancing. Norway's capital is now a place of constant travel and exploration. The 76,940 photos used to create this video embrace Oslo's city rush and functionality. 

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Changing Face of the US/Mexico Border

Changing Face of the US/Mexico Border | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This lesson plan was specifically designed with Arizona examples and aligned to the Arizona state standards, but it be easily adapted.  I saw a presentation based on this lesson at the NCGE conference as was incredibly impressed.  Also, you'll note that like this one, there are many other lesson plans freely available on the Arizona Geographic Alliance website.  

 

Tags: K12, borders, political, landscape, migration, unit 4 political.


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oyndrila's comment, October 14, 2012 11:40 AM
I found very useful resources on the website. Thank you for sharing it.
Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an important lesson, especially for those who actually live in Arizona/Mexico and have seen the border itself. Learning about the Arizona/Mexican border is important and shouldn't be left solely to teaching it only in those areas. The maps included in the lesson plan are efficient and could be used in the high school setting.

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Ghosts of War

Ghosts of War | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The remarkable pictures show scenes from France today with atmospheric photographs taken in the same place during the war superimposed on top.

 

In this fastinating set of images, Dutch artist and historian Jo Teeuwisse merges her passions literally by superimposing World War II photographs on to modern pictures of the where the photos were originally taken.  This serves as a reminder that places are rich with history; to understand the geography of a place, one must also know it's history (and vice versa).   

 

Tags: Europe, war, images, historial, place. 


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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:26 AM

I'm not even sure what to say about this set of pictures exactly, except that they're a very cool way to see history. I'm interesting in Social Studies and history because I'm captivated by seeing the world framed in a story, and these images do just that. To see the same places where the war was fought and what has changed is great, but these photos also give the impression of some stories of war. The idea of them being "ghosts" gives the impression of something left behind which marks the land even to this day.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:56 PM

Very interesting, I've seen similar things done with Russian cities and parts of the Ukaranian country side.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:47 PM

This Dutch historian does a great job at interweaving places that were ridden by the second world war to its modern reconstruct. As a child, I use to question a lot what a place looked like prior to it being destroyed. In the context of Europe a continent, ridden by war, the historian not only does a great job at depicting past and present, her photographs also show how the country's government went to great lengths to preserve some of its land's historic sites.

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Lake Baikal Land Art

Lake Baikal Land Art | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Land artist Jim Denevan has created the world's largest work of art to date. Spanning 31-km-sq, the project is a 'drawing' on the frozen surface of the Siberian Lake Baikal.  Follow the link for a 2 minute video on the production of the art. 


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World's Most Amazing Bridges

World's Most Amazing Bridges | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Geography is not just about natural landforms. Urban structures are also equally fascinating. For today, let's...

 

The discipline of geography is about making the connections, bridging the gaps between various facets of Earth.  These 15 iconic landscapes play a strong role in how people remember place...gorgeous pictures.


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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:34 AM

This article is interesting because it talks about considering bridges as landforms. Although bridges are not natural landforms they are indeed man made landforms. The appreciation for bridges come from the means that they provide as well as their beautiful structure. The bridges a lone form their design allow people to connect and interact with one another so bridges are also viewed as a tool for connect people as well.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 29, 2015 12:42 AM

It's really interesting that the Brooklyn Bridge is number 1. Being a former New-Yorker myself, I am fascinated by the old-fashioned looking structure of the Brooklyn Bridge. This bridge has a cable wire web-looking pattern that helps hold the bridge together and before the 1950s and it use to be useful for trains and streetcars. Now, it not only looks great but it's very useful because it allows six lanes of cars, a walkway for pedestrians and a couple of bike lanes for bikers. All of them make their way from Brooklyn to New York City and back.
This is a photo I took of the Brooklyn bridge towards Manhattan.

https://www.facebook.com/JaJoSchneiderPhoto/photos/pb.579649308750192.-2207520000.1422509199./698888010159654/?type=3&theater

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Interactive Sistine Chapel

Interactive Sistine Chapel | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

One of the amazing memories of my trip to Europe was visiting the Vatican and developing a kink in my neck from marveling at the ceiling in the Sistine Chapel.  No photography is allowed to preserve reverence in what many consider not only a cultural heritage site, but a holy site.  This link is the next best thing to being in the Vatican staring at the Sistine Chapel.  We might not be able to travel the world with our students, but this can help us bring the world to our classroom.


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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 10:50 AM

This is a very cool opportunity due to the fact that photography isn't usually allowed in the Sistine chapel. Of course it can't compare to the beauty of the place in person, but in some ways it's almost more powerful as this room is usually filled to the brim with tourists, seeing it empty is a bit more striking as you can appreciate the fool instead of missing it in the crowds of people.

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Latinization of Southern Space and Place

Latinization of Southern Space and Place | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Latinization of Southern Space and Place project investigates how the myriad discourses of migration and globalization have become manifest graphically across social spaces and street graphics in the contemporary American South.

 

As local demographics change, so does the cultural landscape and--as evidenced by Alabama writing the toughest anti-immigration law in the U.S.--the political landscape.   


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