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A very good sign that North Korea is bluffing about war

A very good sign that North Korea is bluffing about war | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

If Pyongyang is as bent on war as it wants us to believe, why is it keeping the inter-Korean Kaesong industrial complex open?

 


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Jusvic Dublois & Cooper Baddley's curator insight, October 27, 2014 9:06 PM

 This falls under politics. This article says that North Korea is probley bluffing on going to war with us. They are saying that why would you keep the inter korean industrial complex open if they where. This is in Pyongyang North Korea

Anthony morales's curator insight, October 28, 2014 12:39 PM

korea wants to start a war but are bluffing because they are leaving one of there main nueclar factories open and not closed off 

 This is a part of PERSIA by this ties in with economy by how Kim Jong lil has to decide what happens in this country

AnthonyAcosta/NoahMata's curator insight, November 5, 2014 1:32 PM

North Korea War

 

The North Korean leader is showing that he is pro war but the actions that he is taking lead us to believe that he is "All Talk". Does he really feel that war is the best option at this point or does he just want to seem like he is the best.  

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What If Rich Countries Shut the Door on Immigration?

What If Rich Countries Shut the Door on Immigration? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Ian Goldin, Director of the Oxford Martin School, warns that a backlash against immigration would wreak havoc on everything from hospitals to the high-tech industry. The interview is part of the Risk Response Network’s “What if?

 

This is article can be an intriguing introduction to a thought exercise geared towards understanding the economic impact of migration and the social processes that create our world. 

 

Questions to ponder:  Which points of the interviewee do you agree with?  Are there some that you think his analysis is off-base?  What do you think the impacts on a given location would be if there was no migration allowed? 

 

Tags:  migration, economic, unit 2 population, immigration, unit 6 industry, labor.


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The Role of Place in Discovery and Innovation

The Role of Place in Discovery and Innovation | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Kauffman Foundation's Samuel Arbesman on his new book, The Half-Life of Facts.

 

This is an interview, Samuel Arbesman,the author of The Half-Life of Facts explains how population density and place matter in forming a creative economic workforce. Urban centers act as drivers of innovation and advancements and attract the more ambitious and daring workers. Additionally, this map on the expansion of the printing press (discussed in the interview) is also a great map to show how technological innovations can spur cultural diffusion.

 

Tags: technology, diffusion, urban, labor, migration, book review.


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Asians in the U.S. labor force, 2008–2010

Asians in the U.S. labor force, 2008–2010 | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Editor's Desk: U.S.Bureau of Labor Statistics...

 

Ethnic geography, migration and economic geography intersect in this compelling infographic. 


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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:56 AM

This chart shows the labor force from 2008 to 2010. It what kind of races were active in the labor force and the percentage the race made up of the labor force. It also shows what kind of work they did and how much of the percentage of that race was involved in a specific line of work.

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 10:57 PM

Migration refers to the movement of people across borders. This graph/article illustrates the large amount of Asians migrating to the United States, and joining the work force. The graph further breaks down the "Asians" by specific origin and ethnicity, showing that Chinese Asians are the most prominent in the US workforce. 

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NYTimes Video: China Halts Shipments of Rare Earths

NYTimes Video: China Halts Shipments of Rare Earths | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In September, China stopped shipping rare earths, minerals crucial to military, cell phone and green technologies, to countries around the world. A report from the Bureau for International Reporting.

 

This 2010 video shows how a primary sector economic activity is reshaping global industry.  Green technologies are dependent on these mining resources and China is the world's rare earth 'superpower.'  Many factories have relocated in China in part because of cheap labor, but also to gain access to these rare earths.   


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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 2014 10:09 AM

This New York Times video discusses China limiting rare earths exports. Rare earths are the heavy elements which are important components in many technologies as they are the best permanent magnets. By limiting the exports, or just completely denying a country like Japan, China sees two benefits. The first, the country gets to keep most of its rare earth resources for itself. China is on the verge of needing massive amounts of rare earths for its own people as the standard of living rises. Secondly, China is forcing many industries to open their factories in China if they want access to the rare earths China has a monopoly on, opening them up to Chinese taxes and tariffs.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 1:57 PM

This video discusses how rare earths are important for a green future. China has halted its shipments of rare earths, which are used in cellphones, laptops and electric cars. China has the largest population in the world and is wise for not exporting an abundance of its rare earths. It is important that the U.S. starts to mine in places such as California for these minerals. Mining may not be good for the environment, but the path to a green future starts in a mine. 

 

Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 17, 2014 1:05 PM

As the video states, China is now realizing its own domestic needs outweighs the desire to export. China needs to go "green" and fast as well as be able to supply its own domestic corporations with the resources they need to supply their own people. An interesting by product of this internalization though, is that it puts its international competitors at a disadvantage. Almost a win-win for them. Japan is a regional competitor and by lowering the amount available to America and Europe, it forces them to speed time and money looking elsewhere. It is both an economic and strategic move, as the civilian needs are important but so are the military needs of rare earths.

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Hot-Dog Factory Jobs Prove Tough Sell in Struggling Oklahoma Town

Hot-Dog Factory Jobs Prove Tough Sell in Struggling Oklahoma Town | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A hot-dog and ham plant has had a tough time filling its jobs even in struggling Seminole, Okla.

 

It's not just jobs that Americans want; it's the right kind of job that they feel is compatible with their education, training and lifestyle.  Not too surprisingly, those willing to work this job include immigrants.  This year old-article shows some of the difficulties in promoting secondary sector jobs, especially in rural America. 


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Why Foreign Students are Hired for Alaskan Fish Processing Jobs

Why Foreign Students are Hired for Alaskan Fish Processing Jobs | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Foreign students come to Alaska under a special cultural exchange visa.

 

Globalization, migration, culture and economics all merge in this issue...good for bringing things together as a "synthesis" piece.  


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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 12:31 PM

I have a mixed opinion on hiring foreign students for this job.  I have many close friends who came to the US as international students, and it can be extremely difficult for them to find jobs. This job provides students with a rare opportunity to work in the American workforce, while earning a decent wage. From the perspective of a foreign student it is a wonderful idea.  If I lived in Alaska I may not have such a sympathetic opinion.  I would probably feel like hiring foreign students for certain positions is taking away jobs from the locals who participate in the community. The article says that locals work in the more skilled positions, and the foreign students work the smaller jobs.  I can understand why the owner would make this move.  The article stated that the student workers work hard and out in long hours and appreciate the opportunity, and come back.  If an appreciates the opportunity they are given and thoroughly enjoys their work, no matter ho w difficult, the end result will be better all around.  As it said, the student was moved to laundry and saw it as a step up. It shows globalization in North America because it is blending the American culture of a hard day's work, earning a wage and being part of the economic community.

David Lizotte's curator insight, January 27, 2015 10:50 AM

I can relate to this article, to a certain degree. When I was studying at RIC, in 2012 or so, I saw a flyer posted in Gaige Hall. It was in regards to working in Alaska on a fish gutting line. Basically the job described in this article, minimum wage, time and a half as an option, but most importantly room and board covered. I thought it to be an excellent opportunity to make some money but also take the money I've made and adventure back to the east coast however I wanted to do so. Apparently I'm not the only one whom was planning such a journey. Long story short, I stayed in Rhode Island... a good decision non the less.

Its clear that the individuals coming to Alaska on the work visa have no other options in there own country. The students are young, want/need money, but also I have a wanderlust and thirst for knowledge of other cultures. This is wonderful and the opportunity is certainly a unique experience. It takes jobs away from citizens, however how many people are truly effected by this? The industry clearly needed workers if it opened its doors to foreign help. If citizens were working this job, the industry wouldn't need more workers from around the globe. 

The only other thing that comes to my mind is that its cheaper to pay non-citizens working through a visa as oppose to enrolling a tax paying  Citizen. If this is the case... such is business.  

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Women and Land Infographic

Women and Land Infographic | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Landesa partners with governments and local NGOs to ensure the world's poorest families have secure land rights, which develops sustainable economic growth and improves education, nutrition, and conservation...

 

Globally speaking, women are the primary agricultural workers yet rarely own land. 


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Michael Crumpton's comment, March 20, 2013 8:38 PM
I'm not quite sure i understand why the woman aren't allowed time saving technalogy if it is they who till the fields. Why is that?
dilaycock's comment, March 21, 2013 1:30 AM
I think the answer lies in the patriarchal nature of many societies in the developing world. Women provide the labour, but are not in a position to make decisions about management of the land. This situation is exacerbated by gender inequities regarding access to education.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 2014 5:27 PM

New portion of the AP HUG Outline regarding Women in Agriculture

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Documentary: Last Train Home

Documentary: Last Train Home | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Every spring, China's cities are plunged into chaos as 130 million migrant workers journey to their home villages for the New Year in the world's largest human migration.

 

I've posted in the past about this documentary which portrays the The cultural importance of New Year's in China and the massive corresponding migratory shifts that take place.  What is new is that the 85 minute documentary is now available online.  "Last Train Home takes viewers on a heart-stopping journey with the Zhangs, a couple who left infant children behind for factory jobs 16 years ago, hoping their wages would lift their children to a better life. They return to a family growing distant and a daughter longing to leave school for unskilled work. As the Zhangs navigate their new world, Last Train Home paints a rich, human portrait of China's rush to economic development."

 

Tags: China, EastAsia, migration, development, labor, development, transportation, unit 2 population.


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Betty Denise's comment, October 10, 2012 1:29 PM
The request video is not available ...
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Photos that bear witness to modern slavery

TED Talks For the past two years, photographer Lisa Kristine has traveled the world, documenting the unbearably harsh realities of modern-day slavery.

 

This is a chilling glimpse into the worst and darkest side of the economic systems of geography and labor in the world. It is estimated that there are more than 25 million people who today live in state that can be described as modern-day slavery. We should not discuss slavery only in the past tense, and yet it conflicts with how most people conceptualize the world today.

 

Questions to Ponder: How can this even be happening in the 21st century? What geographic and economic forces lead to these situations portrayed in this TED talk? What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today?

 

Tags: TED, labor, economic, class, poverty, South Asia, Africa, video.


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Kyle Toner's comment, November 6, 2012 12:17 PM
This video truly opened eyes into the conflict of modern day slavery. I had no idea just how prevalent, global and horrible this situation is.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2013 10:51 AM

This is a chilling glimpse into the worst and darkest side of the economic systems of geography and labor in the world. It is estimated that there are more than 25 million people who today live in state that can be described as modern-day slavery. We should not discuss slavery only in the past tense, and yet it conflicts with how most people conceptualize the world today.


Questions to Ponder: How can this even be happening in the 21st century? What geographic and economic forces lead to these situations portrayed in this TED talk? What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today?


Tags: TED, labor, economic, class, poverty, South Asia, Africa, video.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 31, 2015 4:34 PM

A truly sad reality is exposed in this well-produced video.  Many of us hear about slavery still happening around us but I think most of us brush it off as little more than taboo.  To see these photos and to hear this woman's firsthand account is shocking.  If you are not instantly moved to want to help, I don't know if you're human.  This is atrocious and I only pray that one day this reality comes to an end.

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Philippines Overtakes India as Hub of Call Centers

Philippines Overtakes India as Hub of Call Centers | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Many companies have moved their customer service lines to Manila to take advantage of workers who speak lightly accented English and are familiar with American culture.

 

The geography of globalization is epitomized by relentless change and marked by continual turnover.  Cultural and economic factors play significant roles in creating potential advantages for receiving outsourced jobs (whether that is beneficially long-term is another discussion). 


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 10, 2013 8:27 PM

Companies have moved their customer service lines to Manila because there the workers speak a lightly accented English and are more familiar with American culture then they are over in India. This shows the maturation of the outsourcing buisness and shows the preference for American English.  

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 2014 12:41 PM

The fact that so many Filipinos speak English is an important one to understand. This brings jobs to the Philippines, but at the expense of local culture. High income and social standing in the Philippines is often correlated with English, as many of the high-ranking citizens attend universities in the United States and return with degrees, and in turn teach their children English. This marginalizes their own language in a way, and is something to keep aware of, as it's one thing that the United States does not face in many areas, that most other countries around the world do.  

 

Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:16 PM

I was most shocked by how Americanized these individual were. I understand that the Philippines were under American control for a fair period of time, but the country obtained its sovereign independence of the US sometime in the mid-40s. They have had close to 80 years to develop their own history, yet the author mentioned the citizens were still watching shows like “Friends” and speaking American English better than other foreign English speakers. It just goes to show how a colony is permanently marked by their past. I am not entirely sure this is a good thing, but at least one positive that came out of the US’s impact is that in speaking more American English there are more call center jobs. As the article mentioned, the jobs helped their sluggish economy. Still, the only reason these jobs are being offered is due to the amount companies save. Not only do the companies avoid paying American workers, whose salary is much higher, the companies are also in an area with better infrastructure. So even though the article claims the companies paid more because the Philippine workers cost $50 more than those from India, they save money on overhead and have better satisfied customers! Looking at call centers from the company’s perspective shows that this former colony is just a pawn once again. Therefore, when we look at intent, globalization just becomes negative again.   

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CSMonitor: Anti-immigration bill, farming and unemployment

CSMonitor: Anti-immigration bill, farming and unemployment | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Farmers in states like Alabama that have passed strong anti-illegal immigration laws are fighting back, saying they are losing labor and that US workers are unwilling to take up farm work.

 

The connection between immigration, job availability and the recession is not as straightforward as some pundits make it out to be.  Why aren't Americans taking these jobs?  What does that tell us about our economy and the recession?  What does this tell us about migrant labor? 


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The Geography of Unemployment and the Recession

The Geography of Unemployment and the Recession | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Not every place and every citizen has been affected by the recession the same way...

 

For the Unemployed, Geography Can Be Destiny by Richard Florida.  This article highlights the uneven distribution of unemployment, and consequently, of job availability.  Where is unemployment highest?  How come? Getting a job isn't just about what you know and who you know, but where you know it.


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:41 PM

While the media often focuses on unemployment on a grand scale, regional trends can add insight to the problem at hand. Some places, such as Yuma, Arizona, have unemployment rates as high as 30% while other, like Fargo North Dakota have a safe 3% unemployment rate. At the height of the recession, unemployment was decently even across the country, but recovery has not been an even process. Demographics could be a large key to understanding these issues. Large metros are more resilient to unemployment due to the higher quantity of college graduates, and their positions as economic and creativity hubs. 

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One Path to Better Jobs: More Density in Cities

One Path to Better Jobs: More Density in Cities | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Building more housing in cities will make them more dense, but everyone will benefit.

 

This is an interesting op-ed that focuses on urban density patterns and the economic structure of the jobs available in the city.  Good to use when discussing economies of scale, market threshold, agglomeration, etc. 


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morgan knight's curator insight, March 10, 2015 10:15 AM

A more dense city might be more productive, but will it always be able to stay that way? A city that is in the middle of a boom will attract a large amount of people seeking jobs, which in just a few years will overpopulate the urban area. It may be better to stay in the suburbs, or even maybe the rural areas of the U.S. Continue to build America's cities, and create more space for people to move into for work.