AP Human Geography Education
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The Separatist Map of Africa

The Separatist Map of Africa | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
When African states gained independence, the continent's new leaders agreed to respect the old colonial borders to avoid endless wars.

 

This interactive map shows the major conflicts on the African continent where the combatants have geopolitical aspirations to separate from the state and create a new, autonomous state.  Click on the red arrows and you can read about the warring factions and the current situation in that region.   

 

Tags: political, governance, Africa, unit 4 political, war, conflict, states, colonialism.


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Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 2014 11:48 PM

Unit IV - Non American

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:04 AM

is sad to see how people just refer to it as "Africa" when every part has its own name. Even myself don't know many of them since they are irrelevant for the western people.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 12:08 AM

This interactive map does a great job of not only showing the sate of political struggles and military conflict within the whole of Africa. This shows the new countries many dissidents  and rebels wish to establish in order to give their people a cultural and ethnic home land. This give a good picture of simply how chaotic some parts of Africa truly are and how destabilized many regions are. 

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Corruption versus human development

Corruption versus human development | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Which countries/regions struggle the most with corruption in their political institutions?  Which countries/regions struggle with development?  Why does corruption seem to be correlated with development? 


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 4:40 PM

It seems that New Zealand is the country to live in because it has less corruption. But one day the corruption will start and that would be the country no one would like to be living in. the United States is also a great place to live in but in certain areas. That goes for New Zealand also. But what I am curious why in other countries there is so much corruption in all these other countries like Congo and Afghanistan. Maybe that one day will change.

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Cyprus, political divisions and protests

Cypriots join the global protest movement to heal their divisions...

 

Cyprus has a long history of violence between Greek and Turkish Cypriots, so the buffer zone protest which follows the #occupy model, has greater political, ethnic, historical and geographic implications.  Will this grassroots effort open a political dialogue to resolve the island’s divisions?  Here is the group's Facebook page.  The video is long, but the first few minutes are especially relevant with a nice overview. 


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Public Space, Private Rules: The Legal Netherworld of Occupy Wall Street

Public Space, Private Rules: The Legal Netherworld of Occupy Wall Street | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Had the protest begun almost anywhere else in New York City, it almost certainly would have been shut down far sooner.

 

While I'm sure we have readers across the political spectrum, the spatial component to this movement is undeniably a "teaching moment."  Occupy symbolically laden space to strengthen your discursive case?  This is a classic strategy (think Tiananmen Square and Tahrir Square for starters).  The actual place occupied is privately owned, and ironically can therefore function as a public place of protest more effectively.  What will you discuss?  


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Systems of Government by Country

Systems of Government by Country | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
This map shows Systems of Government in the World.

 

This is an excellent tool for comparing political institutions around the world and analyzing regional difference between political systems at a global scale. 


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On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories

On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Tags: MiddleEast, territoriality, transportation, borders, conflict, governance, political, unit 4 political. 


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Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 2014 11:32 AM

A relatively grim reminder that even things as clear-cut as road systems can be inherently political. This system forces segregation by the law of which roads can be driven on, but it's a good jumping point to remember that even the placement of roads can exclude or include communities. I'm reminded of the proposed idea for a NAFTA superhighway running through Mexico, Canada, and the US. One of the criticisms was that the highway would not provide exits for anywhere but major economics centers, effectively cutting off small towns from the rest of the area.

Zach & Wafeeq's curator insight, November 4, 2014 5:04 PM

Area/Geography: This is a diagram of what Israel is like for Palestinians and Israelis. It shows extremely restricted access for Palestinians. Whereas Israelis have all of the roads. This diagram fairly falls under the Area/Geography category because of the fact of how the Israeli government is manipulating the area/geography of the land of Israel to suit their best interest. 

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:33 PM

Here one can see the political territoriality among Israel. For example in this article webpage we saw that people with Palestinian license plates can not drive on Israeli roads. This is one of the many instances where people are segregated according to their beliefs. 

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Hungary Destroys Monsanto GMO Corn Fields

Hungary Destroys Monsanto GMO Corn Fields | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Hungary has taken a stand against biotech giant Monsanto and genetic modification by destroying 1000 acres of maize grown with genetically modified seeds.

 

Peru and Hungary have both banned GMOs. What are the reasons that many are critical of GMOs? What should the government's role be in agriculture and food systems? Are bio-tech companies too strong?


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Courtney Holbert's curator insight, February 3, 2013 10:57 PM

With Monsanto having such a large political power, this is very interesting tat Hungary took a stand. 

Maria Bustamante's comment, February 22, 2013 11:56 AM
This article is about countries that are taking a stand against the company Monsanto. Many people in those countries are critical against the use of GMOs because they're not sure about how the genetic engineering will affect the crops. Already GMOs have had negative effects. The use of GMOs reduces the variety between the seeds. Not only that but the farmers are no longer getting the money the deserve for their hard work and they are not allowed to save their seeds. The government should have little control over the agriculture and what they decide to plant. They should take more precautions against the GMOs and they should make sure that the food system companies in charge of checking the safety food should not have a connection to the very food companies they are supposed to be condemning. Bio-tech companies are getting too strong because they're gaining too much control of the fields due to the patents they hold on their GMOs. This is dangerous because they could end up having a monopoly on the franchise and when they due if something happens to their crops it will happen to all the crops. It will be, for lack of a better word, very bad.
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NYTimes: Wall Street Protest Shows Power of Place

NYTimes: Wall Street Protest Shows Power of Place | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Occupy Wall Street is a potent reminder of the ancient civic ideal of public space, and how far we have drifted from it in the modern era.

 

"Imagine Zuccotti Park, one protester told me, as a Venn diagram of characters representing disparate political and economic disenchantments. The park is where their grievances overlap. It’s literally common ground."  Posted in many sites, but since this article treats the important of place as its central point, it merits reposting.  This article also situates the current protests within a deeper historical context as so many movements have 'taken to the streets.'  


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Palestine is but one of many aspiring to the United Nations

Palestine is but one of many aspiring to the United Nations | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Admission to the General Assembly of the UN is not open to all. The Palestinian Territories are just one of several regions without a seat at the world's top table.

 

Palestine's bid for statehood and international recognition is making the political geography definition for state all the more relevant?  What is a state and what is not?  What function does UN membership play in the process of statehood and sovereignty?


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Kendra King's curator insight, May 3, 2015 2:19 AM

In order to be recognized as a sovereign entity from the UN the country must have the full vote of the UN acknowledging that the state exists. However, given the set up of the security counsel, that makes becoming a state really hard. Currently, China & Russia oppose Europe and the United States' desires and vice versa. As the article shows, the  countries seeking statehood outside of Palestinian all seem to have one member of the team on board, but not the other. As such, I don't foresee recognition in the future anytime soon.

 

The whole limbo status, is astonishing to be. I find it weird that a place, like Palestine, can have a flag and a national language, and many other elements of most countries, but not be a country as the article mentioned. From this angel, it amperes international acceptance is the most important factor. This made me wonder, even if the security counsel did have similar interests would accepting any of the nations in would be a good idea? Many of the countries that want to be admitted are from the former soviet union block, which as mentioned in class is often shattering among ethnic groups. However, due to all of the different ethnicity and people within the region, how many smaller countries should be carved out when these were accepted? Also, at what point does this just create further instability?

 

As much as I don't agree with the UN security counsel excluding the voices of the developing world, the current set up does block hastily adding new countries to the world. Given the present too many new nations could set in unstable regions, this might be better for the world. Or I could be wrong because skirmishes could continue until someone recognizes a party. Since I don't want to keep play the what if game, I am just going to end by saying that if the security counsel is ever change, the geopolitical consequences would need to be analyzed heavily. This situation alone is case and point.     

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Google Earth Controversy

Authorities use Google Earth to crack down on illegal activities.

 

A great clip to discuss geospatial technologies, privacy and governance.  This could also be used to discuss urban political geography and city planning.  


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Matthew Rowland's curator insight, April 18, 2013 12:37 AM

Cool talking about the possible contraversies associated with google earth