AP Human Geography Education
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The Greatest Invention?

"What was the greatest invention of the industrial revolution? Hans Rosling makes the case for the washing machine. With newly designed graphics from Gapminder, Rosling shows us the magic that pops up when economic growth and electricity turn a boring wash day into an intellectual day of reading."


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 4:05 PM

unit 6

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 4:06 PM

unit 6 key concepts: industrialization, development, technology  

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:23 AM

Washing machine, the greatest invention of the industrial revolution. Hans Rosling further proves this point, highlighting many aspects of how industrialization not only changed the economy, but the people.

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The Complete Global Map of Abortion and Birth Control Laws

The Complete Global Map of Abortion and Birth Control Laws | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The complete global map of laws governing abortion and birth control.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 3, 2013 8:11 PM

This series of maps shows the cultural and legal differences around the world that impact access to abortion and birth control.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 5:18 PM

Another example of how the United States allows their citizens freedom to make a choice. Americans are allowed to choose contraception types, take birth control and get an abortion if they want to. Some countries only allow abortions if a child is conceived by rape. And then there are countries like El Salvador where an abortion is illegal and no one is permitted to get one under any circumstance. It is interesting to see all the different countries and their legal beliefs on these matters, and how it varies from state to state in the U.S. It gives the reader a little insight into the cultual and legal beliefs of the countries shown. 

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:00 AM

i noticed Africa is really against abortion and thats probably do to the lack of medical care that can be provided by the country. Most contries are ok with birth control. I also learned from these maps that condoms are actually free in some countries and in others not even available for purchase.

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For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price' | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"China's one-child only policy and historic preference for boys has led to a surplus of marriageable Chinese men. Young women are holding out for better apartments, cars and the like from potential spouses...30 to 48 percent of the real estate appreciation in 35 major Chinese cities is directly linked to a man's need to acquire wealth — in the form of property — to attract a wife."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, podcast, culture, population.


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:16 PM

I feel as though marriage can be complicated in China due to the one child policy. The amount of males outweigh the females. Therefore, there will not be as many marriages because there are not enough females to go around. Grooms have to put out so much for their brides. For example, in this article, her groom is unable to even get in the room to see her unless he puts up a chunk of money first. This is a typical ordeal for Chinese weddings. People describe it as a negotiation process. He must do whatever is told of him before seeking her hand in marriage. The "bride price" is when the groom gives the brides family a fair amount of money. A typical amount for an ordinary family to give is around $10,000. This is so much to get married and on top of all this, gender roles are typically unbalanced. In order to get married in China, you best make sure your a man ready to fulfill every request of your bride.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 2015 5:53 PM

I always heard that men were more desirable in China because they are the ones that carry out the family name and provide for the family. Women, however, are seen as much weaker and are treated as lesser. For the newly wed couple in the article, they hope to have a baby girl because it is much cheaper when she gets married. I never thought of it this way but having a girl would be much cheaper as the parents would not have to pay the "bride price" or for the apartment in which their daughter will be living in. 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:48 AM

Unit 3

Culture

Cultural Practices

Cultural practuces in China are changing, but old customs are staying the dame. An old tradition is still being help up, called the "bride price.;This is a price that men must pay in order to marry. In China the male to female ratio is vey off, with 117 men to every 100 women.

Insight

Women are still being given a price on their head. It's a little different than it is in America.The culture behind the bride price is still going on in China and with China's ways of remembering traditions. China is a very traditional place with cultures following old traditions. The One Child policy, resulting in many males compared to females, and the strong traditions in China all result in why their customs stay for so long. 

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WomanStats Maps

WomanStats Maps | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. We comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 310 indicators of women's status in 174 countries. Our Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge.  Click here if you are a new to the project."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 30, 2013 7:48 PM
I have linked to the WomanStats Project in the past because their global datasets and maps are perfect for get students to explore a potential topic that might be of interest to them.  I'm resharing this now because they have recently updated their maps page to include 28 statistical measures to indicate the status of women around the world (including this one on the gendered discrepancy of access to secondary education).  The WomanStats Project provides important data and maps regarding issues of gender, access and equity with a spatial perspective.

Mary Rack's curator insight, March 31, 2013 7:44 AM

Amazing and thought-provoking. 

Daniel Landi's curator insight, April 1, 2013 2:08 AM

Topic link: Population and Change: Gender

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Mother's Day Dates around the world

Mother's Day Dates around the world | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
This map show Mother's Day celebration dates around the world.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 20, 2013 9:27 AM

While most of the world celebrates Mother's day in May, March 21st (the vernal equinox) is day most countries in the Middle East celebrate Mother's Day.  So, why might the first day of spring be the day used to honor mothers?  Hint: think about agricultural cycles and fertility symbols.  Happy Mother's Day!

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:34 PM

Mothers Day is a holiday to celebrate mom. It doesn't matter when it is as long as its being celebrated. Though its a "made-up" holiday, its still a special one to all those moms out there.

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Women and Land Infographic

Women and Land Infographic | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Landesa partners with governments and local NGOs to ensure the world's poorest families have secure land rights, which develops sustainable economic growth and improves education, nutrition, and conservation...

 

Globally speaking, women are the primary agricultural workers yet rarely own land. 


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Michael Crumpton's comment, March 20, 2013 8:38 PM
I'm not quite sure i understand why the woman aren't allowed time saving technalogy if it is they who till the fields. Why is that?
dilaycock's comment, March 21, 2013 1:30 AM
I think the answer lies in the patriarchal nature of many societies in the developing world. Women provide the labour, but are not in a position to make decisions about management of the land. This situation is exacerbated by gender inequities regarding access to education.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 2014 5:27 PM

New portion of the AP HUG Outline regarding Women in Agriculture

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The State of Women in the World

The State of Women in the World | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Tags: gender, development, worldwide, poverty.


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 12, 2013 1:39 PM

Gender Development index - CHapter 9 materials

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:09 AM

This is a great represenaton for showing the unfortunate truth of the state women in the world today.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:15 AM

Why are women so unequal to men? Why are women in the Middle East seeing such bad treatment and unequality? How can we fix these problems?

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Thousands of Women March in Cairo

Thousands of Women March in Cairo | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The demonstration grew by the minute into an extraordinary expression of anger at the treatment of women by the military police.

 

This is a teaching moment not to be passed over. What historically has been the 'acceptable' role for women in the Egyptian public square? How do gender norms vary from place to place? When and why do they change (or are they static)? What role does gender play in politics? In your opinion, what values SHOULD the public square embody? 

 

To watch the (graphic) video that touched off these protests, see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=NgcUefoIXx8


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U.S. AID education/poverty infographic

U.S. AID education/poverty infographic | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

An excellent infographic that highlights the importance of education in the process of fighting poverty.  Why is education (especially women) so pivotal for development?  Should this change how we think about humanitarian aid?       


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Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, January 27, 2014 8:37 AM

From this article i get to know that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually suceed through hard work and support from their family.

Zemus Koh's curator insight, January 27, 2014 10:11 AM

From this infographic, I can see the importance of education and how it can impact us in our lives. Education is key as it can help us in many ways such as being able to teach our offspings survival skills and also help us to earn more so that we can bring up a family and support them. However important education is, it still comes with a price. As such, many are deprived of this oppurtunity to be educated even though education is somewhat considered a neccessity. Other benefits of education to women include a lesser chance of contracting STDs and also having a higher chance to immunize their children compared to non-educated women. Since education is a key to survival and an important part in our lives, why is it that no effort is made to promote this or to fund more projects that help the less fortunate to get a chance to be educated?

Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, February 23, 2014 7:28 AM

This article tells me that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually succeed through hard work and support from their family. It stated that most children who drop out from school are girls and most of the people cant read live in developing countries. In this century i am sure that proper education are given to those who could not afford it as everyone want to succeed. I think that it does not matter if a child's mother is without an education as they can succeed if they work hard and opportunity is given to them.

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Gender Divisions in Iran

Gender Divisions in Iran | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

For my non-Farsi speaking readers, this map displays a 'male' province and a 'female' province.  These two provinces are separated by barbed wire, 20-meter trench and the Great Wall of China with ground-to-air missiles.  

 

While not a "cartographically accurate" map of the divisions within Iran, it does symbolically highlight the enormous gulf between men and women.  Men and women are not in separate provinces, but what might the symbolic spatial gender division on this map represent for Iranian society? 


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Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:01 PM

I think this picture shows how Iranian society thinks and operates. There is an entirely different set of rules, ideals, and codes men and women follow in their society. Women are typically held inside, wear head coverings, are not allowed to be in the public sector unless accompanied by a man or her husband. This map isn't real, but it does show that if they were in separate provinces, there would be a gender division that could spring a revolution for women to be educated and empowered, and it could also hurt the economy because ultimately a society needs women to have children to ensure there is a workforce.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:15 PM

An extreme exaggeration that still addresses a real issue in Iran. Although there is no barb wire and missiles that divide genders in Iran there are cultural as well as structural barriers that keep men in the public sphere while women are kept in the private sphere. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:16 PM

This map here shows the gender division of men and women sides of the country. Running down the middle would be a a barbed wire with ground to air missles. One issue of this would be the fact that birth rates would drastically drop with the separation of the men and women. However the women would be allowed to go out the house and not have a man with them and be able to be out without fear of being hurt or killed. This would be a sure way to demolish a country.

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Why is King Abdullah willing to let Saudi women vote but not drive cars?

Why is King Abdullah willing to let Saudi women vote but not drive cars? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
King Abdullah announced on Sunday that  Saudi women will be allowed to vote and run for office in municipal elections beginning in 2015.

 

Driving a car as simple as it may sound, is a method of enhancing mobility and that means freedom of spatial expression.  This decision to allow women to vote has only demonstrated the cultural constraints of gender roles and how much more progress is needed.  


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James Hobson's curator insight, October 21, 2014 7:04 PM

(Central Asia topic 5 [independent topic])

The decrees made by Saudi Arabia's King regarding women's future rights are being viewed as empty promises. On top of that, this topic is at the convergence of not just political, but also social and religious topics. Political, social, economic, and religious interests are all tugging issues such as women's rights to vote and drive in different directions.

I am surprised this article did not mention something which I had heard before: the Saudi government still does not allow women to drive not only out of social custom, but also because their highways are facing a congestion problem. Giving women drivers licenses could roughly double the number of cars on the already-gridlocked roads, making commuting and transportation even more of a hassle.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 12:51 PM

What I find interesting is that allowing women to vote seems like a big step towards equality but it may be more superficial at addressing the real issue at hand. Women in this country are living with so much constraint, letting them vote may not be the giant step forward it seems to be. There are still cultural and institutional barriers that restraint the freedom and natural rights of women.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 23, 2015 6:40 AM

This decision is absolutely meaningless. Elections matter little in Saudi Arabia. The nation is an Absolute Monarchy. The Kings word on all issues is absolute. On the other hand driving a car, is a much more important symbol of freedom. Allowing women to drive, would give them a sense of mobility. Driving in all most every culture is associated with independence. The car allows you to travel anywhere you want, and avoids the trap of relying on others for transportation. By driving a car, you essentially achieve a certain level of independence. By keeping women from driving, you keep them from achieving independence, and force them to be dependent on the males in their lives.    

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Interactive Infographic: How Does Lack of Water Affect Women and Children?

Interactive Infographic: How Does Lack of Water Affect Women and Children? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A GOOD Transparency....

 

This simple graphic shows the uneven effects of development based on demographic factors such as gender and age.   


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 3, 2011 7:52 PM
My first question is, why does it have to be the female who has to find clean water for her children. Most of us have seen the challenges and how horrific it is to get clean water in some poor countries, these poor women everyday have to nurture their children (which isn't always just one or two) provide for the family and on top of it all search for water. I just think in these types of countries where women face so much complexity in surviving, but also their children because, as soon as their children can walk they are usually also set out to fight for themselves.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 3, 2011 8:30 PM
Good question, because there is nothing biological that makes women the "right choice" to get the water, but it is a cultural bias that is ingrained within so many societies. The cultural notion of "woman's work" is most certainly different from place to place.
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Which country has the smallest gender gap?

Which country has the smallest gender gap? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
How narrow is the gender gap in the United States compared to some other countries? 

 

This article is good for analyzing global cultural, economic and political patterns, especially within a gender unit.


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Gender Gap Index

Gender Gap Index | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

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xavia's comment, April 10, 2014 12:38 AM
gender gap chloropleth
Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 29, 2015 8:30 AM

Summary- This map shows the equality of genders through their economic participation,  health, and access to education. In many poorer places you can see there is a much greater gender gap than in places like scandinavia where there isn't much of a gap at all. I

 

Insight- In Unit 3 one of the main subjects was gender. This chloropleth map shows the relationship between states and their equality among genders. It is easy to tell that in most undeveloped countries there is a much larger gender gap than more developed ones.

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:37 AM

Gender Inequality Index-

This article explains the places and locations of gender inequality, and how most of this is densely kept in Africa, where most men are more powerful than women. It also shows how in more developed countries, their is gender equality, and with it better economy.

This article shows gender inequality index by the map and information displaying how gender inequality is located more in developing countries. And gender equality is placed in developed countries.

 

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In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports

In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Private girls' schools are now allowed to hold sports activities in accordance with the rules of Shariah, or Islamic law. Students must adhere to 'decent dress' codes and Saudi women teachers will be given priority in supervising the activities, according to the Education Ministry's requirements.  The decision makes sports once again a stage for the push to improve women's rights, nearly a year after two Saudi female athletes made an unprecedented appearance at the Olympics."  This news comes at a time when Saudi Arabia has allowed women to ride bikes (sort of).

 

Tags: Saudi Arabia, culture, gender, religion, Middle East.


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Lena Minassian's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:24 PM

I was happy to see an article like this. It's about time that these women are being given equal opportunities. Although they have a long way to go this is a step in the right direction. Saudi Arabian girls are being allowed to have sport related activities within their private schools. This did surprise me a little just because Saudi women's rights are very limited but this is a simple improvement just to the general health and well being of these girls. Two females competed in the last years summer Olympics representing Saudi Arabia and their efforts were not shown on Saudi TV. These women competing has opened a few doors to allowing more than just men to engage in these activities. Usually sports were only for the elite women who could afford gym memberships or attend well known colleges. Even though women cannot compete internationally or sign up for clubs or leagues this is a step in the right direction.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 4:47 PM

This is an interesting article about slowly allowing women in Saudi Arabia to participate in sports. While playing soccer or swimming or running may not seem so important to us in the West, it is a big deal for Saudi women. Saudi Arabia has some of the strictest laws in the Middle East regarding women's rights, and so even a very partial and gradual allowance for women to engage in sports is a big step. It shows perhaps a slight softening of adherence to Shariah law, which would hopefully eventually allow women more freedom in the realms of education and work, as well as in everyday life. 

 

Too often are people quick to judge and characterize other cultures or religions by the most extreme examples. While it is true that laws in Saudi Arabia are extremely restrictive to women, progress such as this, though small, may well act as a stepping stone for increased freedoms for women. People outside of Saudi Arabia and Islamic culture must realize that this kind of progress does happen and is, in fact, happening right now. To simply dismiss Saudi culture as misogynistic and oppressive is to write the whole culture off. While progress is slow and less than ideal, we should look to Saudi Arabia's Islamic neighbors and see that many of them are not so oppressive to women. Allowing Saudi women to participate in sports, therefore, may be setting up the country to increase women's rights and join its relatively more liberal neighbors. This is certainly a sign of positive change, and one that should not be ignored. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 23, 2015 6:28 AM

I was quite shocked to hear of this story. There is no denying, that this is a step forward for the women of Saudi Arabia. However, women are far from free in this country. The activates still have to be in accordance with Islamic Law. The strict dress code also remains in effect for the girls. The Sports themselves, must be overseen by women teachers. I would not call this initiative the Saudi equivalent of title nine, but it is a step forward. Every little inroad, is a step towards more equality. The government of Saudi Arabia appears to be at least slightly altering its view of women. Hopefully this will be the first step in movement to gain Saudi women more rights. In generations to come, hopefully Saudi women will look back on this development as the start of a cultural revolution in Saudi Arabia.     

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China's one-child policy creates massive gender imbalance

The Chinese government says its so-called "one-child policy" has succeeded in reining in its population. But more than three decades after the policy's imple...

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Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 5:28 PM

This video gives a summary of the extreme consequences the "one-child policy" China has set in place. There are so many more men than women now, many are left to be bachelors for life. Many Chinese women are moving into the city looking for a rich and powerful man, and they succeed because there men are eager to marry. The Chinese have always had a preference for male children over female children. Now that the difference in population in so high, the government has made it illegal for doctors to tell parents the sex of their child before birth. This is a great example of the different kinds of culture that exist on the other side of the world. 

Li ShiJia's comment, February 3, 10:15 PM
The one child policy, a part of the family planning policy, was a population planning policy of China. It was introduced in 1979 and began to be formally phased out in 2015. According to the Chinese government, 400 million births were prevented. This policy has created a massive gender imbalance because the Chinese prefer boys over girls and with only 1 child allowed, many girls abortion have occurred. The number of boys over girls are at a shocking ratio of 177 boys to 100 girls. This caused a re-evaluation of the policy in November 2013, and in 2015, it was reported that the existing law would be changed to a two-child policy.
Li ShiJia's comment, February 3, 10:15 PM
The one child policy, a part of the family planning policy, was a population planning policy of China. It was introduced in 1979 and began to be formally phased out in 2015. According to the Chinese government, 400 million births were prevented. This policy has created a massive gender imbalance because the Chinese prefer boys over girls and with only 1 child allowed, many girls abortion have occurred. The number of boys over girls are at a shocking ratio of 177 boys to 100 girls. This caused a re-evaluation of the policy in November 2013, and in 2015, it was reported that the existing law would be changed to a two-child policy.
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Technology and Tradition Collide: From Gender Bias to Sex Selection

Technology and Tradition Collide:  From Gender Bias to Sex Selection | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Every year, as a result of prenatal sex selection, 1.5 million girls around the world are missing at birth.  How do we know these girls are missing if they were never born? Under normal circumstances, about 102 to 107 male babies are born for every 100 female babies born. This is called the sex ratio at birth, or SRB."

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 2013 3:23 PM

How do local cultures create these demographic statistics?  How do these demographic statistics impact local cultures? 


Tags: gender, technologyfolk culture, statistics, China, population.

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Gendered Differences in Development

Gendered Differences in Development | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Being a woman can be much more difficult, based on where you live. 

 


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The Body in Public Space

The Body in Public Space | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Here are some seemingly eclectic topics.  All of them center around the appropriateness of the body being displayed publicly and the cultural norms that shape how we think about the issue.  I've included a sensational restroom, public nursing, top-free protests, and of course, the Kate Middleton scandal.

 

Tags: culture, popular culture, gender, place, space.


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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 26, 2012 10:11 AM
Hilarious! The breasts of women are human parts of a woman which should be respected because it is where a human being feeds. It is a symbol of life.
Don Brown Jr's comment, September 30, 2012 8:07 PM
This cartoon clearly shows how breast are sexually marketed in our society and how we will can accept the fashionably sexual display of breast in public yet consider breast feeding offensive. In many ways this cartoon seems to show how some social norms seem to interfere with common sense as we should be more critical of the sexual advertisement of breast while breast feeding on the other hand should at the very least be tolerated.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:37 PM

I think the men who prohibit public breast-feeding of babies should be starved.  I have a baby cousin, whom I love dearly, and I would hate to delay his lunch as much as anyone else would hate to have their own lunches delayed.  To prohibit public-breastfeeding is cruel, discriminatory, and hypocritical, as these prohibitors were likely publicly breastfed at some point in their infant days.  A message overall about other people acting 'scandelously'- get over it.  Grow up.  I don't like having to hear from or about you, and it takes away from my definition of a perfect world when I see people starving my baby cousin.  Culture should accomodate to the entirety of the population, not a majority.  After all, as for babies- we've all been there, and as for old people- we'd be lucky to live that long, but we'll llikely be there too.  I don't think we should be governed by someone that some people elect and other people don't vote for, because it's really not fair... it would be better and a compromise to not be governed at all!  So don't be critical, be understanding... Peace and Love!

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The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan

The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In a country this battered, fractured, dysfunctional – how much can she really hope to achieve?

 

The issue of female education in Pakistan has exploded after Malala Yousafzai was attacked by the Taliban for publicly advocating for girls to receive more schooling.  This attack has lead several media outlets to take a more serious look at the gendered cultural and economic opportunities (or lack thereof) for girls within Pakistan.  This NPR podcast also speaks of the real options in front of so many girls like Malala and the cultural and political contexts within which they navigate their lives.

 

Tags: gender, South Asia, podcast, culture, Islam, development, unit 3 culture, education.


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Daishon Redden's curator insight, April 22, 2014 10:00 AM

I chose this article because it talks about limit of freedom in LDC's and how girls are not allowed to get an education. This was the main idea of what Half The Sky was. Girls no being given the same rights as boy.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 1:40 PM

Starting this article response off with a quote seems only appropriate. This article follows Malala Yousafzai through her horrific experience being victimized by the Talaiban. She is an inspiring girl with all the set backs she has had to endure and she wants the right for an education for Women in her country and society. She is determined in order to create a better life for herself and her people. “The peasants had a very difficult situation, but they didn’t give up,” Aroosa says in English. “They fought back, and got power. Girls can fight back and can get an education. A girl can bring a big change.”

Kendra King's curator insight, March 28, 2015 8:45 PM

It would make sense for the immediate well-being of the girls for the family to just leave Pakistan. As the article mentioned, the economy is horrible for graduates (especially women) and the country lives in a dangerous military state. Yet, the family (excluding the father) continues to stay in Pakistan. I wonder, since their father is a doctor and can afford private schooling, if they stay because of the wealth advantage. As the author alluded to, girls can be more than teachers if they have the resources like Prime Minster Buhtto did. Still though, with the danger so high and better jobs available I really think there is more to the story. The explanation that makes most sense to me came from Mahrukh’s statement regarding Prime Minster Buhtto when she said, “Everyone has to go from this world, why not be famous? Why not make a name and leave your name on people’s lips.” This quote shows just how dedicated Mahrukh is to her country. It is so high that she is willing to die doing something important (provided it makes her famous).  In some ways, I find that misguided. I think the attention girls like her and Malala can bring to people who are donating to the politically broken school is of immense value. This attention wakes more people up to the issues of Pakistan and the issues of the Taliban to one day put more pressure on the nation. Yet, I know Malala doesn’t want to continue to raise awareness among the Western world her whole life. Her autobiography ends with her dreaming of returning to Pakistan. Like Mahrukh, she will die for her country too (308-311). A part deep down can see though, that for a revolution to happen the girls need to actually stay within the country. For one, the west can only interfere with the politics of another country for so long. Furthermore, I am still a legitimate believe in sovereignty despite the increasing globalization. By this I mean that it is the countries issue and it is through the pressure and convictions of the people against the government and the Taliban that will have the most impact. I hope that by staying these girls will one day have an immense impact on the social culture in Pakistan. 

 

*Yousafzai, Malala, and Christina Lamb. I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban. First ed. New York: Little, Brown, 2013. 308-311. Print.
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It Only Takes a Girl

It only takes one girl to make a difference.

 

This is a poignant way to convey some of the gender issues that are present in the developing world.  This is NOT a pick me up, and most classes would need some preparation before showing this video clip since it requires a high maturity level.   


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tara's comment, February 2, 2012 5:19 PM
Left speechless at the powerful statistics. Makes you think about certain issues that are taken for granted in the United States.
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NPR: Saudi Women Drive Change Despite Mixed Signals

Authorities continue to go after women who flout Saudi Arabia's ban on female drivers, but King Abdullah has pledged to give women more political power in the coming years.

 

This article focuses on public space and differentiated cultural norms that created deeply gendered spaces that are onerous to navigate. Gender, Place and Culture are all intertwined.   


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UN: Facts and Figures on Rural Women

UN: Facts and Figures on Rural Women | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Countries with the highest levels of hunger also have very high levels of gender inequality...


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Woman Stats Project

Woman Stats Project | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. We comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 310 indicators of women's status in 174 countries. Our Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge."

 

With assistance from the Geography Dept. at Brigham Young University, the WomanStats Project provides important data and maps regarding issues of gender, access and equity with a spatial perspective.  


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Brandon Murphy's comment, July 9, 2012 6:53 PM
I think this just reinforces the factual information that we already know of about how different cultures across the world treat women in all regards/aspects of life.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 9, 2012 9:51 PM
This information provided from this map reveals much more to the observer than the security of women. From looking at the location of the wealthiest counties in the world, I can make a connection between women’s rights and economic strength, education, birth rates as well as life expectancy in different regions of the globe.
Erin McLeod's curator insight, August 6, 2015 10:56 PM

interesting human geography standpoint

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China's village of the bachelors: no wives in sight in remote settlement

China's village of the bachelors: no wives in sight in remote settlement | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Surplus of males caused by preference for sons means poor subsistence farmers have no chance of finding a mate...

 

One-child policy, gender preference, rural-urban divide in modernizing China...the list of applications goes on. 


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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 7:33 PM

I don’t understand how China could kill Chinese girl’s baby’s and not see 20 years down the road how that would affect there country. Even if it’s the family doing it because the boys can work and help the family eat, the government should have created job opportunities for girls motivating the poorer families to raise there children equally.  Maybe they wanted to thin overpopulation in china so they skipped a generation, it seems horrible but empires have done terrible things in history to maintain power.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 6:23 PM


This was going to happen anyways because china having that one child rule was going to imbalance the population more males less females. Those rules being in place family members were forced to have boys because they would be the one to take over and inherent the land its parents left them. If they would have a girl they that land will go to the husbands family and plus boys would be the favorite child because they can work much faster than what a girl would. That being said the girls would be given up or killed. Now china has millions of males and little females. Which makes it difficult for the males to get married and have children of their own.

The ratio to males to females is six to one talk about crazy. But now that china has allowed a family to have two children instead of one. Now over the years we will see and increase in females and as well as males because of the imbalance of the country. But china allowing to have more than one kid will come at a price because

that is more people they have to maintain and china already being overpopulated will make it even worse for them.