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Linguistic Diversity at Home

Linguistic Diversity at Home | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Counties where at least 10 percent of people speak a language other than English at home."


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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 10, 2013 8:02 PM

This map does not bring many surprises.  Places where there are a lot of Spanish speaking families are present in places where many Spanish people immigrate to, along the Mexican border and the southern tip of Florida, where Cuba is close by.  One interesting thing about the French areas seen in Louisiana is that their version of French is a regional dialect. Not only is their a cluster of French speaking families, but they are all speaking a language native to the region.  It is very surprising that there are not as many French speaking families along the Canadien border.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, September 26, 8:34 AM

This map shows how linguistically diverse the United States is today. This map reminded me of one of the slides that we went over in class about how in the Northwest Region the predominant language was German and now it is mainly English, with some German and Native American languages still spoken in certain parts.

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 26, 7:29 PM

This data is very interesting because you can see that most of these statements speak Spanish. I noticed that most people who speak another language at home (in this case Spanish)  besides English are located in the south western of United States. I wonder if this has something to do with people who immigrated to U.S  from south America.

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Tea for Two

"We came to Sri Lanka with every intention of filming a video about an organic, fair trade tea farmer. That is exactly what we were planning when we set foot on the small tea farm of Piyasena and his wife Ariyawatha. What we didnt expect was to be so taken with the relationship between the two of them. What started as a farm story quickly turned into a story about love and dedication amongst the Ceylon tea fields."

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 18, 2013 8:08 PM

The beginning of their love story is rooted in cultural traditions that many would find oppressive (arranged marriage), and yet there is much about their sweet relationship that is near-universally admired. 

James Matthews's curator insight, May 21, 2013 8:16 AM

Definitely a case of oppression versus admiration - what a wonderful story.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 11, 9:38 PM

This video is about a tea farming couple whose arranged marriage has been very successful. The cultural tradition of arranged marriage may seem oppressive to us, but there are a great number of them where the couple stays happy. In these cultures with arranged marriage, divorce is usually not a realistic option, so these couples are possibly more willing to cooperate to make their marriage work than in the United States, but undoubtedly many remain unhappily married.

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Technology and Tradition Collide: From Gender Bias to Sex Selection

Technology and Tradition Collide:  From Gender Bias to Sex Selection | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Every year, as a result of prenatal sex selection, 1.5 million girls around the world are missing at birth.  How do we know these girls are missing if they were never born? Under normal circumstances, about 102 to 107 male babies are born for every 100 female babies born. This is called the sex ratio at birth, or SRB."

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 2013 12:23 PM

How do local cultures create these demographic statistics?  How do these demographic statistics impact local cultures? 


Tags: gender, technologyfolk culture, statistics, China, population.

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Christmas in Mexico

Christmas in Mexico | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are some very special traditions surrounding Christmas celebrations in Mexico.

 

Yo quiero encontrar un lugar en New England con buñuelos!


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Folk Cultures: Fiddler on the roof

Folk cultures are rural, religious, agricultural, family-based and in a word: traditional.  This classic movie's opening 10 minutes are a good primer for markers of folk cultures and struggles that folk cultures have to maintain there vitality in a globalizing world.  


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 26, 2013 5:55 AM

Folk cultures are rural, religious, agricultural, family-based and in a word: traditional.  This classic movie's opening 10 minutes are a good primer for markers of folk cultures and struggles that folk cultures have to maintain there vitality in a globalizing world. 

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Vanuatu: Meet The Natives

"Five men from the remote Pacific island of Tanna arrive in America to experience western culture for the first time, and force us to look at ourselves through brand new eyes..."

 

This cross-cultural experiment reinforces numerous stereotypes, but also seeks to get viewers to look at issues from a variety of perspectives.  Folk cultures, modernization and globalization are all major themes of this show.     


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Caleb Gard's curator insight, December 12, 2013 7:15 PM

These five men that were from the Pacific Island of Tanna go to America to get an experience for themselves of western culture for the first time. They travel many miles to find out for themselves what our culture was like. In doing this they brought over their own culture into America, making this a great expierience for themselves and those that they came in contact with on their journey. When these men came from Tanna to America to experience the cultural difference between the two places. Some long term effects of this experience is that the men might bring American cultures into their tribe, and they most likley had brought their cultures over here with the people that they came in contact with. Over all this excurssion will help the people cominig on contact with it learn about others cultural defferences from their own.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 3:14 PM

This promotion for the series "Meet the Natives" is a laughable cross-cultural experiment in forced globalization. While there are many political and cultural problems with this video, perhaps the Vanuatu people are less isolated and exotic than we really think. It's naive to think they are totally backward with no interest in connecting with the world.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 23, 3:46 PM

It is amazing to see travels of Pacific Islanders to America and their brief takes on their journey. Usually it is the other way around with the Americans telling the stories. These pacific islanders are greeted by their friends upon their arrival home and talk about how they met so many great people.

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Exploring Languages: Gullah Net

Exploring Languages: Gullah Net | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Explore Gullah culture in South Carolina with Aunt Pearlie-Sue.

 

The audio component is the most crucial part of this site, since it allows students to hear Gullah being spoken for a language unit.  Is Gullah a separate language from English?  Is it a dialect, accent or pidgin?   


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, October 25, 2011 5:48 PM
I dont know how I feel about this website. I feel as though the way Aunt Pearlie Sue is speaking or this Gullah language is just a accent. Although this accent is prejudging that, that is how down in South Carolina they speak but, doesn't every state have its own accent? For example Rhode Islands accent of words such as car, park where we don't pronounce the letter endings.
Seth Dixon's comment, October 28, 2011 11:19 AM
It most certainly is at least an accent, but I'd argue that it is also a distinct dialect for English. The words, sentence structure and pronunciation are distinct and the vocabulary is born out a cultural experience that evokes a greater difference from "standard English" that the Rhode Island "bubbler" for "wicked smart" kids.
Are regional dialects a hinderance economically? Should we culturally seek to preserve them?
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TED Talk: Wade Davis on endangered cultures

TED Talks With stunning photos and stories, National Geographic Explorer Wade Davis celebrates the extraordinary diversity of the world's indigenous cultures, which are disappearing from the planet at an alarming rate.

 

This is a fantastic look at indigneous cultures around the world.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, December 8, 2012 2:21 PM
The first thing that struck my attention in this video was when the speaker said that other cultures teach us about alternative ways to orient ourselves, as humans, on Earth. I never thought about cultures in that sense. When I would look at another culture that is much different from my own culture I just couldn’t comprehend their way of life. But, each culture is just using the Earth’s resources in many various ways, making us not so different in the end. It also makes it much easier to comprehend stranger cultures than our own.
Don Brown Jr's comment, December 10, 2012 7:27 PM
This video brings to light a real dilemma concerning the “plight” of indigenous cultures in the modern world. The forces of globalization has been accelerated by improvements in communication and transportation technologies which have made interaction seem almost instantaneous compared to previous centuries. Yet, this globalized world is changing our notions of significance and attachment to place due to this relative ease of mobility. I have to acknowledge that this is something the indigenous cultures haven’t lost. As Davis clearly explains, the relative isolation that these societies adapted to is becoming increasingly difficulty to maintain, as the forces of global economic integration is binding the world closer to gather (whether people like it or not).
Also another issue that concerns me revolves around the unintended consequences of trying to preserve these cultures. It is possible that we may be accelerating their extinction as external pressure from us may cause these indigenous cultures to become specialized areas which eventually become subject to “exotic” tourism and research, inevitably changing the culture of what was intended to be preserved.
John Caswell's curator insight, February 6, 6:59 AM

Important watch.

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Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, February 20, 3:27 PM

McDonalds is a social and economical chain restaurant that has not made its way to Bolivia. Sure, they like hamburgers but they prefer to get them from the women hawking them on the streets. Who can blame them? When is the last time you bought something that was made in America? Probably a couple weeks or months even. Cultural traditions are fading out fast and moves like this are what will keep Bolivians culturally enabled.

Paige Therien's curator insight, March 1, 1:21 PM

There is much valuable information to learn from other countries and cultures, especially when it comes to food because subsistence greatly shapes a culture.  Of course, the United States is very different than Bolivia in terms of culture and geography, but there is a lot to take away from the structural rejection of McDonalds in Bolivia.  Bolivia has taken advantage of the altitudinal zonation that is characteristic of their mountainous country; they have formed a system of reciprocity which fosters strong community and leaves no room for giant food corporations such as McDonald.  If people in the United States want a change in their food systems, the first step is rejecting the systems that should not play a role, but currently do.  Institutions like McDonalds have allowed people to be so far removed from their food sources, and ultimately, an important characteristic unique to humanity (food producers).

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 6:41 AM

       It's interesting that globalization is one of the reasons for the growth of fast food chains like McDonald’s around the world. It’s hard for countries to turn down a food company who really does configure their menu to the consumers their serving. I find it interesting that Bolivia found a way to resist this. Its topography is what made the last store close in 2002. McDonald’s couldn’t survive in the mountainous country with the Andes and the Amazon. They were able to resist because the nation always prioritized local control of its food system and eating healthy. Its people value food, food producers, and their ecosystems

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For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price' | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"China's one-child only policy and historic preference for boys has led to a surplus of marriageable Chinese men. Young women are holding out for better apartments, cars and the like from potential spouses...30 to 48 percent of the real estate appreciation in 35 major Chinese cities is directly linked to a man's need to acquire wealth — in the form of property — to attract a wife."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, podcast, culture, population.


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 7:54 AM

With the new gender imbalance, it is interesting that Chinese families now see boys as the gender that will cost them more money in the long run, it used to be the girl that was a finical burden.  This is a big change in thinking from just a generation ago, it will be interesting to see how this plays out in china over time.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 8:11 AM

This article shows how the One Child Policy has skewed the gender balance in China. There is a shortage of young women and, in order to attract a wife, young Chinese men feel the need to acquire more wealth to gain a competitive advantage in a China with a surplus of men. This wealth grab is possibly fueling the housing market in China, but Chinese women are not seeing many benefits for themselves. The wealth of their husbands tends to be left in the husband's name, leaving women out of the growing economy of China.

 

There is another potential issue as well. The Chinese men are taking out loans to pay for inflated housing prices. If the housing market crashes, these marriage seeking men are left with significant debt for apartments which were overvalued to begin with.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:34 PM

This article is recent too which is scary. Men should be able to pick their own brides and money shouldn't be involved. Women shouldn't have to marry someone for the sake of her family but if thats what she wants to do then fine. Different countries operate different ways and in China, this is how they work.

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Inside a halal slaughterhouse in Queens

This is the story of a halal slaughterhouse in Queens. It is a bit graphic at times, but the culture, history and passion behind the business is fascinating.

 

While a bit gruesome in moments, this video is an excellent view into the inner workings of an ethnic neighborhood.  Why are the cultural connections to a 'homeland' so important to immigrants?  Why is halal meat more expensive than what you would find in a grocery store?  Why is food such an important part of culture?  For more about this NY company and what halah is, see: http://madanihalal.com/ ;       


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elsa hunziker's comment, January 30, 2012 11:24 AM
D:
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 8, 12:51 PM

While a bit gruesome in moments, this video is an excellent view into the inner workings of an ethnic neighborhood.  Why are the cultural connections to a 'homeland' so important to immigrants?  Why is halal meat more expensive than what you would find in a grocery store?  Why is food such an important part of culture?  For more about this NY company and what halah is, click here.     

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A Rio Runs Through It: Naming the American Stream

A Rio Runs Through It: Naming the American Stream | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Displayed is a map originally produced by Derek Watkins.  This map is a fantastic combination of physical and cultural geography.  While most flowing bodies of water will be called rivers or streams, the lesser used terms (brook, fork, bayou, run, arroyo, etc.) show a striking regionalization of toponym regions.  What do these patterns indicate?  Why are in those toponyms found in those particular places? 


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cookiesrgreat's comment, February 2, 2012 2:10 PM
this is one of my favorite maps. intertwines language, geography, communications and history into one piece
cookiesrgreat's comment, February 2, 2012 2:12 PM
This is one of my favorite maps. Combines geography, language and history
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Linguistic diversity dwindling

Linguistic diversity dwindling | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"80% of all web communication is in ten languages, yet 95% of humanity speaks roughly 300 languages.  Could Apple Siri and Google Voice help save the world's languages?"

 

This graph stunningly displays the result of dwindling linguistic diversity in this era of globalization and technological innovation.  Why have so many languages been dwindling?  Why are an important few growing? What is the future of the majority of the world's languages that have so few native speakers?   


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GIS student's comment, September 18, 2012 7:57 AM
I think there is a lot of emphasis in this article based on help. The only way certain languages are going to survive is if people help promote them. I feel that most Americans are blind to the substantial amount of languages that exist because everywhere we look people are tuning English as there primary language. Global advertisements are commonly seen in English. The Olympics had an incredible amount as well. I think the root of this problem starts with education of new languages, especially in America. Language is definitely something that needs to be embraced especially at a younger age.
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TED Talk: Wade Davis on endangered cultures

TED Talks With stunning photos and stories, National Geographic Explorer Wade Davis celebrates the extraordinary diversity of the world's indigenous cultures, which are disappearing from the planet at an alarming rate.

 

This is a fantastic look at indigneous cultures around the world.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jesse Gauthier's comment, December 8, 2012 2:21 PM
The first thing that struck my attention in this video was when the speaker said that other cultures teach us about alternative ways to orient ourselves, as humans, on Earth. I never thought about cultures in that sense. When I would look at another culture that is much different from my own culture I just couldn’t comprehend their way of life. But, each culture is just using the Earth’s resources in many various ways, making us not so different in the end. It also makes it much easier to comprehend stranger cultures than our own.
Don Brown Jr's comment, December 10, 2012 7:27 PM
This video brings to light a real dilemma concerning the “plight” of indigenous cultures in the modern world. The forces of globalization has been accelerated by improvements in communication and transportation technologies which have made interaction seem almost instantaneous compared to previous centuries. Yet, this globalized world is changing our notions of significance and attachment to place due to this relative ease of mobility. I have to acknowledge that this is something the indigenous cultures haven’t lost. As Davis clearly explains, the relative isolation that these societies adapted to is becoming increasingly difficulty to maintain, as the forces of global economic integration is binding the world closer to gather (whether people like it or not).
Also another issue that concerns me revolves around the unintended consequences of trying to preserve these cultures. It is possible that we may be accelerating their extinction as external pressure from us may cause these indigenous cultures to become specialized areas which eventually become subject to “exotic” tourism and research, inevitably changing the culture of what was intended to be preserved.
John Caswell's curator insight, February 6, 6:59 AM

Important watch.

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"It's Not My Mountain Anymore"

"It's Not My Mountain Anymore" | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"First-hand accounts of profound experiences and mountain living in rural Appalachia."

 

This book touches on important themes.  In our rush to strengthen the economic vitality of our urban areas, what are the cultural and environmental impacts within rural areas?  This nostalgic look at a bygone era also exemplifies the concept of "place" as a geographic term, and the deep emotional attachments that it evokes in so many.


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