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Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Sahel’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study.  Among the 22 countries making up the arid region in northern Africa, the population grew to 471 million in 2010 from 367 million in 2000, a jump of nearly 30%. As the population grew rapidly, the production of crops remained essentially unchanged.  Using satellite images to calculate annual crop production in the conflict-ridden Sahel belt, south of the Sahara desert, the researchers then compared output with population growth and food and fuel consumption."

 

Tags: Africa, Sahel, population, environment, water, ecology, environment depend, weather and climate, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 5:59 PM

with the strife in this region it is hardly surprising that it is hard to maintain food supplies in the face of large scale immigration. in a region where it is hard to survive, immigration would be a massive threat, straining already thinly spread resources.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:22 AM

If a country has a big population growth, the resources that it has if they are already scarce may become devastating. As the population of Sahel does increase, the amount of food resources will not have the proper time to react to the growth. Granted it may take a while for agricultural crops to grow and many citizens may face hard times facing finding food, but their hardships will be overcome by farmers trying to produce more crops to help ease that hardship.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:38 PM

this seems like an alarmingly common problem in the world today with population growth happening at an alarming rate in many parts of the world. most notably india and china. as well as in sahel, if your population grows by 100 million in 10 years it will be impossible to keep up and be able to provide for that many people in such a reletively short time.

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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:29 AM

Looking at these photos reminded me of the video that we watched in class where water was rushing under a road and within minutes the road started to fall apart and eventually ended up completely divided in half. It is amazing how quickly the water can erode what is underneath and cause such damage to the road and area around it. Looking through the pictures it almost makes you nervous to drive on such a rode again because it all happens so quickly. It goes to show you just how powerful that water is to cause destruction like that. It is not easy to destroy a road like that. Again it goes back to the goegraphy. This type of thing doesn't just happen everywhere. Having a river like this presents the possibilities of something like this happening. Once is starts eroding it happens quick. A road that may look driveable one minute may be completely eroded 5 minutes later. It is amazing how a rush of water can cause such damage. Even if there are set systems to get the water through, sometimes the water rush is too powerful and breaks through and erodes the earth underneath anyway like we saw in the video in class. I have never seen anything like these picture before, and it really is amazing to see what can happen. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:59 PM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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Stunning Satellite Images of Earth

Stunning Satellite Images of Earth | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Exclusive timelapse: See climate change, deforestation and urban sprawl unfold as Earth evolves over 30 years.

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Ishola Adebayo's comment, July 31, 2013 9:07 AM
good day Sir, pls need help on fixing scan line errors on lansat7 ETM images from 2003 using for example ArcMap9.3 or ENVI4.5 or.........thank you so much
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:55 AM

summer work KQ2 key concepts: remote sensing, deforestation, desertification, land use, geospatial

Jill Wallace's curator insight, August 20, 2015 7:57 PM

Great images!

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Exclusive Economic Zones

Exclusive Economic Zones | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Today, a country’s marine economic area is defined by its Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), a 200-nautical mile-wide (370 km) strip of sea along the country’s national coast line (hi-res image). This regulation, which was installed by the ‘UN Convention on the Law of the Sea’ in 1982, grants a state special rights to exploit natural (such as oil) and marine (for instance fish) resources, including scientific research and energy production (wind-parks, for example).

 

Questions to ponder: how does this series of buffer zones around the Earth's land masses impact politics, the environment and local economies?  Where might the EEZs be more important to the success of a country/territory than other regions? 

 

Tags:  economic, environment, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, environment depend, territoriality, states, conflict, unit 4 political.  


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Interactive World Statistics

Interactive World Statistics | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Brazilian government's geographic department (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística-roughly equivalent to the U.S. Census Bureau) has compiled an fantastic interactive world factbook (available in English and Spanish as well as Portuguese).  The ease of navigation allows the user to conduct a specific search of simply explore demographic, economic, environmental and development data on any country in the world.    

 

Tags: population, worldwide, statistics, mapping, zbestofzbest.


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Leonardo Martins's comment, October 20, 2012 11:08 AM
So cool…thank you very much!
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 24, 2012 10:23 AM
The world, here, is literally at your fingertips. It is a simple way for anyone to locate a multitude of data about any given place around the world. It is another way that brings the whole world that much closer in this technological era.
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3D spatial analysis of air pollution

3D spatial analysis of air pollution | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In the Air is a visualization project which aims to make visible the microscopic and invisible agents of Madrid´s air (gases, particles, pollen, diseases, etc), to see how they perform, react and interact with the rest of the city."

 

This takes spatial thinking into the atmosphere...worth exploring especially since the key trends being charted are anthropogenic in nature. 


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NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner

NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Americans ate 475 million pounds of tilapia last year, making this once obscure African native the most popular farmed fish in the United States.

 

Industrial farming, human-introduced species, GMOs, outsourcing and environmental impacts are but some of the relevant themes from this video.  How are global taste buds reshaping the geographic landscape? 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 25, 2013 9:04 AM

Industrial farming, human-introduced species, GMOs, outsourcing and environmental impacts are but some of the relevant themes from this video.  How are global taste buds reshaping the geographic landscape?


Tags: GMOsindustry, food, agriculture, agribusiness,

 

Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 25, 2013 12:44 PM

My concern is how safe is bioengineered food?  How has its nutritional content been altered?  Until some of our questions about bioengineered food can be answered by the FDA and other government officials I remain leery about the potential side effects that might occur from eating it and wonder how nutritious it really is.

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:59 AM
The video discusses how now alot of countries are industrially farm raising their fish. Tilapia is a perfect example Americans ate 475 million pounds of Tilapia last year. Ten years ago you would never even hear about Tilapia because it was not a popular fish. Times have changed how they raise them and then ship them out the video shows one of the farms where they grow the TIlapia.
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Why Cities Rock

Why Cities Rock | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The guest, Harvard economist Ed Glaeser, is the author of the new book Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier.  What are the benefits and challenges of living at high densities?  How do cities spur economic innovation and collaboration?  This 17 minute audio clip (or transcript) is a good primer for the advantages of cities for humanity.


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Images From Freeport Mine

Images From Freeport Mine | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

With the Freeport Mine strike still in the news, this photo gallery of the world's largest gold mine is an excellent set of teaching images.  For more images, maps and aerial photography of the mine see: https://www.google.com/search?q=freeport+mine&hl=en&client=firefox-a&hs=ZFo&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&prmd=imvns&source=lnms&tbm=isch&ei=ze_TTr_VAuL50gGT2qEn&sa=X&oi=mode_link&ct=mode&cd=2&ved=0CB8Q_AUoAQ&biw=1440&bih=768


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NYTimes Video: China Halts Shipments of Rare Earths

NYTimes Video: China Halts Shipments of Rare Earths | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In September, China stopped shipping rare earths, minerals crucial to military, cell phone and green technologies, to countries around the world. A report from the Bureau for International Reporting.

 

This 2010 video shows how a primary sector economic activity is reshaping global industry.  Green technologies are dependent on these mining resources and China is the world's rare earth 'superpower.'  Many factories have relocated in China in part because of cheap labor, but also to gain access to these rare earths.   


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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 2014 10:09 AM

This New York Times video discusses China limiting rare earths exports. Rare earths are the heavy elements which are important components in many technologies as they are the best permanent magnets. By limiting the exports, or just completely denying a country like Japan, China sees two benefits. The first, the country gets to keep most of its rare earth resources for itself. China is on the verge of needing massive amounts of rare earths for its own people as the standard of living rises. Secondly, China is forcing many industries to open their factories in China if they want access to the rare earths China has a monopoly on, opening them up to Chinese taxes and tariffs.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 1:57 PM

This video discusses how rare earths are important for a green future. China has halted its shipments of rare earths, which are used in cellphones, laptops and electric cars. China has the largest population in the world and is wise for not exporting an abundance of its rare earths. It is important that the U.S. starts to mine in places such as California for these minerals. Mining may not be good for the environment, but the path to a green future starts in a mine. 

 

Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 17, 2014 1:05 PM

As the video states, China is now realizing its own domestic needs outweighs the desire to export. China needs to go "green" and fast as well as be able to supply its own domestic corporations with the resources they need to supply their own people. An interesting by product of this internalization though, is that it puts its international competitors at a disadvantage. Almost a win-win for them. Japan is a regional competitor and by lowering the amount available to America and Europe, it forces them to speed time and money looking elsewhere. It is both an economic and strategic move, as the civilian needs are important but so are the military needs of rare earths.

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Feeding 7 billion & our Fragile Environment

Feeding 7 billion & our Fragile Environment | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This photoessay puts together a diverse set of issues that are interconnected.  Industrial agriculture and metropolitan pollution; rising energy prices to sustain consumptive lifestyles with environmental degradation linked to oil spills; regions susceptible to climate change and regions producing that change...thought-provoking.  


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Daniella Tran's comment, February 21, 2013 11:03 PM
I had always known that the amount of humans on this planet was way too much, but i had never realized that our daily consumption of all these resources can result in the issues that are shown in these pictures. These pictures show areas that are highly polluted and it is overwhelming to think that the beautiful earth that we live in is filled with images like that. The number of factors that affect our environment is countless, especially with the growing figures of pollution, waste, use of natural resources and food production. The photo that stood out to me the most from this collection, is the one where the polar bear had to resort to eating a polar bear cub. It is difficult to think that the polar bear did that act as a sign of desperation because of the lack of food affected by the changing environment.
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Richie Sowa's Man Made Island

Bringing a whole new meaning to the terms "your own private island" and the "creation of place."  An intriguing hook for discussing human and environmental interactions and what resources are needed to sustain life.   


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 4, 2011 10:52 AM
Thanks to "LF ric" for this link...super cool and something I would have never dreamed of (but wish I did).
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 8, 2011 10:03 PM
Love this video! I think this is amazing!
Michael Aria Mosaffa's comment, February 20, 2013 10:36 PM
this is quite amazing and remarkable! But how does he use the restroom, does he like squat ovoer the edge or something? Or how does he get purified water? How does he get meat? Does he know how to make a fire without a match? How does he get enough food for him, 2 cats, a dog, 2 chickens, and a duck? Besides those questions I think he is a brilliant mad-man!
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Countries must plan for climate refugees

Countries must plan for climate refugees | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The world's governments and relief agencies need to plan now to resettle millions of people expected to be displaced by climate change, an international panel of experts said on...

Climate change and political geography should merge, but unfortunately not in this way. 


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What would happen if humans became extinct?


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 6, 2014 4:37 PM

What would Earth be like if all humans suddenly disappeared? This question posed on the YouTube series Earth Unplugged, has many intriguing ecological and biogeographic ramifications that are worth considering to explore how systems are interconnected. 


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, video.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 10:29 AM

I find this youtube video interesting but for sure, the planet has become very interconnected with humans but that has not been a postiive effect. Humans have done nothing but manipulate the natural order of the ecosystem. If humans went extinct I would assume the earth would balance its self out.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, January 27, 2015 7:50 PM

It is funny because this video just made me think about TV shows such as The Walking Dead and Z-Nation.  Of course, not for the zombies, but what if some disease might wipe out the human race, and also how the earth will looks like after human extinction. The impact on earth when human life is gone will be catastrophic for domestic animals left behind. The wild animals will become dominant. Many species will also become extinct and a lot of chemicals will poison grounds and infrastructure will collapse with the force of the weather after few years. Although, it is fascinating how humans can preamble the fact that satellite can be worked forever after humans are gone from Earth. It is not only about humans, but also about the Earth that we need to come up with more reasons to be green on the planet. 

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China's reliance on coal reduces life expectancy by 5.5 years, says study

China's reliance on coal reduces life expectancy by 5.5 years, says study | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

........"Linking the Chinese pollution data to mortality statistics from 1991 to 2000, the researchers found a sharp difference in mortality rates on either side of the border formed by the Huai River. They also found the variation to be attributable to cardiorespiratory illness, and not to other causes of death."

 

High levels of air pollution in northern China – much of it caused by an over-reliance on burning coal for heat – will cause 500 million people to lose an aggregate 2.5 billion years from their lives, the authors predict in the study, published in the journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:44 PM

We talked in class about how certain poor working conditions or pollution emissions are permissible in countries whose laws allow for such situations, and how countries like the US arrange for certain work to be done in those countries.  This 'work' stuff all centers around an ever-necessary "profit" that exists as a carrot being dangled in front of a horse as it runs all of its life, blinded to everything else.  It is almost cartoonish, that for a percentage increase in profit due to minimalized expenses, a moral businessman might yield and give in to the temptation of exposing workers to dangerous conditions... or that all businesses might do the same thing... It is socially dangerous; a hazard like bullying, or cheating, using others as human shields to collect the damage while someone else collects the benefits.  I don't think that any life form should be exposed to such unfairness, because it just does not resonate with my philosophical consciousness that any individual should have a better life than another (or worse).  And why make it worse for someone?  Why pollute their areas?  Why steal their natural resources?  Why... Capitalism at all?  I do not think greed is innate to human nature, because selflessness does occur, and is often leaned towards in conventional modern morality/ethics.  I think that the vicious cycle that capitalism puts us in causes us to self-servingly run around like angry rats trying to feed ourselves, which causes us to take out risks on other people, and polluting other people's living space.  It really is sad, because this planet is alive... there is so much life on this planet, assumedly and debateably from this planet, this planet that we consider our home.  To be killing ourselves by not keeping our home clean and healthy is like a very bad habit- it's like smoking.  And it is taking a toll on the planet, as well as its inhabitants

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 2014 11:20 AM

This article and the accompanying resources describe the damage the pollution problem China has in its cities. China's economic desire to do things as cheaply as possible for the best profit margins has done significant damage to the air and now to its own people. By burning cheap coal to meet energy needs China has created a fairly toxic atmosphere in its Northern cities. The pollution is causing high rates of cardiorespiratory illness and even the government-controlled news can't keep quiet about the issue.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 5:28 PM

This article explains how China is burning an abundance of coal for heating. The Chinese population is over 1 billion; image the amount of coal that must be burned in order to supply heat for the people of northern China. Unfortunately, the burning coal is polluting the air and causing the Chinese to have lower life expectancies. China, along with other countries should start to find other ways to heat their homes. 

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NASA animation of temperature data from 1880-2011

Tags: video, environment,  visualization, climatechange, environment modify. 


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Obama's Secret Weapon In South

Obama's Secret Weapon In South | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
States in the Deep South traditionally vote Republican in every presidential election. However, a string of "blue" counties curve through Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia.

 

Question to ponder: How does the physical geography of a region impact the human geography of a place?  Using this example, does the environment completely determine the cultural outcomes of the region?  To what extent does one impact the other?

 

Tags: physical, political, environment, unit 4 political.


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Nat'l Geographic Video -- Hurricanes 101

Find out how hurricanes can be so destructive.

 

Not only will you learn about hurricanes but you can also watch videos about lighting, tornadoes, volcanoes, and overall everything about the weather. These are great videos to use in class when teaching units about natural disasters. These videos are full of great engaging facts.


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Carly Griffiths's curator insight, May 17, 1:04 AM

I absolutely loved watching these videos. I believe they would be a fantastic resource to show students or for students to use for research when exploring natural disasters. This site provides multiple videos on multiple different disasters. Each video provides great information and facts including, causes, when and where they are most likely to happen, the amount of damage, different sizes and speed and past examples. Each video provides such great visuals and explanation for these natural disasters. Students would be able to gain deep knowledge and understandings to support their research and/or investigation. I am currently in the middle of creating a task for my students using digital technologies such as this and incorporating collaboration through Wikis and blog. I plan to use these videos to further my students knowledge and encourage further exploration on these videos for their research.

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Pavan Sukhdev: Put a value on nature!

TED Talks Every day, we use materials from the earth without thinking, for free. But what if we had to pay for their true value: would it make us more careful about what we use and what we waste?

 

Companies derive economic value from the environment without paying the true environmental costs of their enterprises.  Sukhdev call this the 'Economic Invisibilty of Nature.'  Many countries are mortgaging their environment's future for economic growth today.  This also disproportionately impacts the developing world and rural people more adversely.  Key to his argument is that we need to identify negative externalities on the environment that produce private profits and acknowledge them as public losses.  


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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, December 10, 2013 7:13 PM

This a very interesting topic. Most of the time we take our earth for granted imagine if we need to pay for every time we use our earth I don’t think we would to afford it. Is very important for us to take care of it. It so sad that we have to force to protect it; for example here in providence we get punish with a fine if we don’t recycle. Taking care of our world should be a feeling from within people shouldn’t be made to do it.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:15 AM

Nature is very important because everyone in the world depends on it because that is where we can get the oxygen that we need to live and also we can hunt for food because many people in this world do not have access to a supermarket because it is to far or they just don’t believe in the existence of a supermarket. I wonder why some people would decide to live so far from civilization because I could not do that. I would get depressed very quickly because there would be nothing to do there.

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The City Solution - Pictures, More From National Geographic Magazine

The City Solution - Pictures, More From National Geographic Magazine | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Why cities are the best cure for our planet's growing pains...

 

Debate the merits of this quote from Edward Glaeser: "There's no such thing as a poor urbanized country; there's no such thing as a rich rural country."  Is this true?  Are there exceptions?  What explains these geographic patterns?  Is there a causal link between urbanization and economic development? 


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The next small thing: How sustainable neighborhoods could reshape cities

The next small thing: How sustainable neighborhoods could reshape cities | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Residents and planners around the country are dreaming up innovative ways to create eco-friendly, self-reliant communities. But turning ideas into reality is a tall order.

 

Urban revitalization projects gentrification have been an important part of the American scene since the 1990s.  As we reconsider the city, and some of the associated issues with dense living, many are also thinking about the environmental impact of urban life and rethinking how to make neighborhoods more sustainable.  This article uses the Denver Lower Downtown (LoDo) neighborhood as its case study for analyzing sustainability with the city.  


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Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, November 19, 2013 3:11 PM

Here we have the perfect example of the positive effects associated with gentrification. Unused and weathering space being revitalized and re-purposed for the benefit of local economy and communitites. Not only that but the intention of these projects is to also operate in an ecologically sustainable manner by using as little resources as possible. The occupation of mill space is something that's even been seen here in Providence, most notably the hope artiste building in Pawtucket on the Providence line.

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:38 PM

I have totally thought about this before, and a family that I know just spent the past several months remodeling their house to be more 'green.'  I think that in addition to energy, neighborhoods could have community grow-ops, where they grow all the necessary crops to sustain their area- fruits, vegetables, grains, cotton, etc. and I think that the communities would be cleaner, greener, and brought more together if they had the opportunity to work every day to provide for themselves and their community.  I miss out on a lot of enjoyment in life because I have to do things like school.  Other people miss out because they have work, or other obligations.  I think that if people farmed as communities, it would be economically, environmentally, and socially proficuous, as well as eliminating a need for capitalistic trade with other regions, where people might get cheated.  I have so many ideas of Utopia that I have gotten from reading and philosophizing with friends and acquaintences, but there really are so few people that have the ability to implement anything on a large scale, that I am often frustrated with these concepts of 'betterment.'  It really is sad that people are taught so much these days, because their brains are full of garbage, rather than new possibilities.  It would be really interesting to have an experimental colony where these ideas of sustainability could be tried out, but I think that will happen long after my generation has died.

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Dangerous work

Dangerous work | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Guatemala City, a place called "The Mine" can deliver both a means of survival and a grisly death. Every day, dozens of residents salvage a living by scouring the massive dump for scrap metal.

 

This thanksgiving I'd like to discuss one of my goals in teaching a geography course in the developed world. I hope to cultivate a sense of thanksgiving and gratitude for the many good things that are easy to take for granted. Balanced with that, I try to teach that economic disparities are NOT a function of moral, mental or physical superiority.  Therefore I try to instill a sense of thankfulness that does not become boastfulness or entitlement--hopefully that ethos will infuse this day's festivities. Happy Thanksgiving!


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sdion's comment, January 30, 2012 2:23 PM
makes me thankful for the jobs i have. i also wonder what the health side effects are of working in these locations. are the workers experiencing shorter life spans or anything like that?
Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:28 PM

As someone who has scoured dumps for things before, this sounds like no fun at all! You can find a lot of cool things that are left at dumps, but this doesn't even begin to compare to what they're facing at "The Mine". The smell and possible injuries must be overwhelming. If left untreated, a cut from anything in one of these places could prove fatal.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:12 PM

Looking at this situation made me really sad, and made me realize that we take a lot for granted.  Here I am, sitting in a comfy chair, using my thousand dollar Macbook, and these people are risking their lives just to make $20.  They risk everything, in any weather, just for the possibility of finding something that they can sell to support their families, and these are the things no one thinks about.  This isn't to say that anyone's "bad situation" isn't bad for them personally, but this is unbelievable to me.  

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Dubai, The World Islands

We are told that we should change the world to be what we think it should be...this urban development has taken that to the extreme, showing human/environmental interactions, development and urban issues in Dubai, UAE.  For more information about this place, see: http://www.theworld.ae/ ;


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 1:46 AM

This is an example of a nation coming into vast amounts of wealth, in this case oil and spending said money largely to show the world it can. Does Dubai expect to make a ton of profit from this? While I can assume I can't see thing being a business driven decision. Instead I see this as an way of yet again showing the world how wealthy their nation is and how they're able to create a world of their own using man made islands. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:38 PM

Dubai has gone into a massive transition over the past few decades. Once oil was discoveredit has become a thriving city full of many high rise buildings and other rich amentities that people like to experience. Its a land that was built from sand and building up from the sea floor. This includes palm tree shape jetties, high rise tennis courts, and an overwhelming strip of buildings. Many of the things that are done here in Dubai are taken to the extreme with human and the environmental interactions.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 5:30 PM
This is amazing! It is a country of high advancement. After it found oil, it became something it never was. Over the past decade or so, Dubai has come from nothing, to something with everything. Although there is probably still high poverty that is not shown. The fact that something like this can be done is quite amazing, pretty much building a world inside a single country.
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Studying "Green"

Studying "Green" | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Green is an unusual film. It is both a hard hitting portrayal of the causes and consequences of deforestation in Indonesia, and a film which captures the tranquillity and calm of wild nature. It contains no narrative or dialogue and yet helps us understand complex commodity chains. Green needs to be taken seriously.  In these pages we present a series of short essays in response to the film." 

 

'Green' is a female orangutan in Indonesia, beset with deforestation and resource exploitation of her habitat.  This is a non-profit film follows her; watch at the film’s website or view the trailer: http://www.greenthefilm.com/

 


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Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
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Skeptic’s own study finds climate change real, but we should be critical

Skeptic’s own study finds climate change real, but we should be critical | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON — A prominent physicist and skeptic of global warming spent two years trying to find out if mainstream climate scientists were wrong. In the end, he determined they were right: Temperatures really are rising rapidly.

 

Objective science is quite unifed...global temperatures are rising.  Arguing that point is simply unscientific and factually inaccurate.


Via Seth Dixon
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