AP Human Geography Education
6.6K views | +0 today
Follow
AP Human Geography Education
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Is Your State's Highest-Paid Employee A Coach? (Probably)

Is Your State's Highest-Paid Employee A Coach? (Probably) | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
You may have heard that the highest-paid employee in each state is usually the football coach at the largest state school. This is actually a gross mischaracterization: Sometimes it is the basketball coach.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:58 AM

By looking at this map you can see that almost 75% of the United States highest paying public workers are basketball or football coaches. In my opinion this seems a little crazy to think about. I figured it would be maybe the school deans or plastic surgeons like the blue color shows in some states. 

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning

Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in school children is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated, it is often used to measure emotional strength.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 2:25 PM

I actually feel this is a great way to teach students, we just aren’t used to it in America.  The students who already know what they’re doing should be helping those who struggle.  When we boast about how well someone does at something, it can actually discourage the student who doesn’t understand.  It is definitely a tricky situation to be in, but I can understand why.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:54 AM

This video lays out them main difference between educational theory in the west, and educational theory in the east. In the west, we place value on a student achieving the right answer. Right Answers eventually lead to high grades. All classes eventually boil down to the grade given. In reality, it is all that most parents, teachers and students care about. In the east knowledge is measured through the work that goes in to getting the correct answer. Mistakes are seen as a natural outcome of hard work. They are not discouraged as they are in western education.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 15, 2015 2:16 PM

the difference in mentality is amazing as described in this article the difference in perception of struggling students in america and Asian countries is staggering and i think that our country has been so concerned for so long with only the best succeeding that it needs to be fixed, i know that we have taken steps int he right direction with different government programs which is promising and hopefully this development will continue

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

100 People: A World Portrait

100 People: A World Portrait | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is the truly global project that asks the children of the world to introduce us to the people of the world.  We've seen videos and resources that ask the question, "if there were only 100 people in the world, what would it look like?"  This takes that idea of making demographic statistics more meaningful one step further by asking student in schools for around the world to nominate some "representative people" and share their stories.  The site houses videos, galleries from each continent and analyze themes that all societies must deal with.  This site that looks at the people and places on out planet to promote greater appreciation of cultural diversity and understanding is a great find. 

 

Tags: Worldwide, statistics, K12, education, comparison.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 10:43 PM

Year 7 Liveability Unit 2

savvy's curator insight, September 3, 2014 12:57 PM

This just makes me realize how the world would be if we only had 100 people rather than the billions we have now.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, February 26, 2015 7:24 AM

A face das crianças no mundo

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan

The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In a country this battered, fractured, dysfunctional – how much can she really hope to achieve?

 

The issue of female education in Pakistan has exploded after Malala Yousafzai was attacked by the Taliban for publicly advocating for girls to receive more schooling.  This attack has lead several media outlets to take a more serious look at the gendered cultural and economic opportunities (or lack thereof) for girls within Pakistan.  This NPR podcast also speaks of the real options in front of so many girls like Malala and the cultural and political contexts within which they navigate their lives.

 

Tags: gender, South Asia, podcast, culture, Islam, development, unit 3 culture, education.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Daishon Redden's curator insight, April 22, 2014 10:00 AM

I chose this article because it talks about limit of freedom in LDC's and how girls are not allowed to get an education. This was the main idea of what Half The Sky was. Girls no being given the same rights as boy.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 1:40 PM

Starting this article response off with a quote seems only appropriate. This article follows Malala Yousafzai through her horrific experience being victimized by the Talaiban. She is an inspiring girl with all the set backs she has had to endure and she wants the right for an education for Women in her country and society. She is determined in order to create a better life for herself and her people. “The peasants had a very difficult situation, but they didn’t give up,” Aroosa says in English. “They fought back, and got power. Girls can fight back and can get an education. A girl can bring a big change.”

Kendra King's curator insight, March 28, 2015 8:45 PM

It would make sense for the immediate well-being of the girls for the family to just leave Pakistan. As the article mentioned, the economy is horrible for graduates (especially women) and the country lives in a dangerous military state. Yet, the family (excluding the father) continues to stay in Pakistan. I wonder, since their father is a doctor and can afford private schooling, if they stay because of the wealth advantage. As the author alluded to, girls can be more than teachers if they have the resources like Prime Minster Buhtto did. Still though, with the danger so high and better jobs available I really think there is more to the story. The explanation that makes most sense to me came from Mahrukh’s statement regarding Prime Minster Buhtto when she said, “Everyone has to go from this world, why not be famous? Why not make a name and leave your name on people’s lips.” This quote shows just how dedicated Mahrukh is to her country. It is so high that she is willing to die doing something important (provided it makes her famous).  In some ways, I find that misguided. I think the attention girls like her and Malala can bring to people who are donating to the politically broken school is of immense value. This attention wakes more people up to the issues of Pakistan and the issues of the Taliban to one day put more pressure on the nation. Yet, I know Malala doesn’t want to continue to raise awareness among the Western world her whole life. Her autobiography ends with her dreaming of returning to Pakistan. Like Mahrukh, she will die for her country too (308-311). A part deep down can see though, that for a revolution to happen the girls need to actually stay within the country. For one, the west can only interfere with the politics of another country for so long. Furthermore, I am still a legitimate believe in sovereignty despite the increasing globalization. By this I mean that it is the countries issue and it is through the pressure and convictions of the people against the government and the Taliban that will have the most impact. I hope that by staying these girls will one day have an immense impact on the social culture in Pakistan. 

 

*Yousafzai, Malala, and Christina Lamb. I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban. First ed. New York: Little, Brown, 2013. 308-311. Print.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

U.S. AID education/poverty infographic

U.S. AID education/poverty infographic | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

An excellent infographic that highlights the importance of education in the process of fighting poverty.  Why is education (especially women) so pivotal for development?  Should this change how we think about humanitarian aid?       


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, January 27, 2014 8:37 AM

From this article i get to know that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually suceed through hard work and support from their family.

Zemus Koh's curator insight, January 27, 2014 10:11 AM

From this infographic, I can see the importance of education and how it can impact us in our lives. Education is key as it can help us in many ways such as being able to teach our offspings survival skills and also help us to earn more so that we can bring up a family and support them. However important education is, it still comes with a price. As such, many are deprived of this oppurtunity to be educated even though education is somewhat considered a neccessity. Other benefits of education to women include a lesser chance of contracting STDs and also having a higher chance to immunize their children compared to non-educated women. Since education is a key to survival and an important part in our lives, why is it that no effort is made to promote this or to fund more projects that help the less fortunate to get a chance to be educated?

Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, February 23, 2014 7:28 AM

This article tells me that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually succeed through hard work and support from their family. It stated that most children who drop out from school are girls and most of the people cant read live in developing countries. In this century i am sure that proper education are given to those who could not afford it as everyone want to succeed. I think that it does not matter if a child's mother is without an education as they can succeed if they work hard and opportunity is given to them.

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

World of Geography at your fingertips

World of Geography at your fingertips | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Worth exploring...this isn't just a single random link.  Geocube is a portal to numerous topics, regions and themes.  

Having been voted by the American Association of School Librarians as one of the "Top 25 websites for Teaching and Learning," Geocube comes highly recommended, and rightfully so (see: http://www.ala.org/aasl/guidelinesandstandards/bestlist/bestwebsitestop25?mid=53 ).  This is a must-see. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

IPEVO P2V Document Camera

IPEVO P2V Document Camera | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

IPEVO P2V is a sleek, affordable ($69) and powerful document camera that is also highly portable.  This is very high on my Edtech wish list.  If you can't wait for funding to come through for technology into your classroom or an ELMO, this might be a nice solution.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geography online games

Geography online games | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"World geography quizzes from Sheppard Software- over 250 fun map games teach capitals, country locations, and more. Also info on the culture, history, and much more."


This has numerous regional quizzes with a wide variety of skill levels making this the perfect 'Goldilocks' activity (student will need to explore, finding that some activities are too easy, some are too hard, before they find the skill level that is just right).  

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Connect to Compete: FCC Launches Digital Literacy Coalition

Connect to Compete: FCC Launches Digital Literacy Coalition | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Libraries and access to digital resources are unevenly distributed.  Programs in the country seeking to close "America's digital skills gap" must address the local issues within their national program. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geography Teaching Bookmarks on Delicious

Geography Teaching Bookmarks on Delicious | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Keep, share, and discover the best of the Web using Delicious, the world's leading social bookmarking service. 

 

An APHG reader and college geography professor have archived a host of his favorite links and online resources on the delicious.com site.  He has made them publicly accessible in the hopes that more teachers can find useful resources.  Thanks for sharing. 

 

Also I the spirit of sharing and collaboration, I am ALWAYS excited to receive a "suggestion" on this site and am glad to see interaction and teaching hints in the "comments."  I am glad to see the links posted on Twitter and Facebooks accounts.  In essence, I'm encouraging more interaction on the site and hope that will help better content and pedagogical resource to be available to a wider audience.   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

New Trailer for "Two Million Minutes"

"This trailer shows the first 3 minutes of the actual film Two Million Minutes." Recommended by an APHG teacher. 


This film shows the lives of high school students in India, China and the US and how globalization is impacting them and education. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Haley 's comment, August 29, 2011 8:18 AM
Please let me know if you would like resources for this film. I have a few. forsythh@pcsb.org
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World

10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Many of us have heard the stories of how our parents or grandparents had to walk miles in the snow to get to school. Perhaps some of these tales were a tad embellished, but we got the point. A lot of American kids have the luxury of being driven in a warm car or bus to a good school nearby. This is not the case for the children in this gallery.

The photos you are about to see are snapshots of the treacherous trips kids around the world take each day to get an education. Considering there are currently 61 million children worldwide who are not receiving an education—the majority of which are girls—these walks are seen as being well worth the risk.

In the above photo, students in Indonesia hold tight while crossing a collapsed bridge to get to school in Banten village on January 19, 2012.Flooding from the Ciberang river broke a pillar supporting the suspension bridge, which was built in 2001."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:52 PM

It is sad what so many children must endure and go through in order to get an education.  I wonder if these bridges and structures have been fixed.  61 million children not receiving an education is 61 million too many.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 2014 2:45 PM

unit 6 economic development

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 13, 2015 2:55 PM

This is really hard to see. Children shouldn't have a hard journey getting to school to get an education and better their lives. These photos are from ten places around the world with the most dangerous journeys to school. This isn't a topic that even comes to mind because many of us living in the United States have had the luxury of being driven to school or riding a bus and we take that simple drive for granted. One of the photos is from Indonesia where students have to cross a collapsing bridge to get to school. The image shows them hanging on for dear life while trying not to fall in the water underneath them. There was a flood that broke the pillar holding this bridge up and it was never fixed after that. What happens when that bridge fully collapses? There needs to be a better way to get these kids to school. These children shouldn't have to suffer with getting their education for situations that are out of their control. 

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

20 Classrooms From Around The World

20 Classrooms From Around The World | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

We are all different...we are all the same.   This is a set set of images that highlights the essential similarities in people across cultures.

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nick Lesley's comment, May 27, 2014 3:42 PM
i thought this was very cool and interesting to see different classes all around the world and how their culture is i would really like to see a video on the classes to see how they learn...cool article and good pictures
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A Photo Essay on School Sprawl

A Photo Essay on School Sprawl | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Schools used to be the heart of a neighborhood or community. Children and not a few teachers could walk to class, or to the playground or ball field on the weekend. This was relatively easy to do, because the schools were placed within, not separated from, their neighborhoods. They were human-scaled and their architecture was not just utilitarian, but signaled their importance in the community. Now it has become hard to tell one from a Walmart or Target."

 

What better way to demonstrate the concepts of urban sprawl, automobile-dependent city planning and economies of scale than by analyzing the very geographic context of our schools themselves?  This is a very nicely arranged photo essay that most could spark conversation and would foster some discussion on how best to plan neighborhoods and spatially arrange the city.   

 

Tags: transportation, planning, sprawl, education, scale. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Young Americans shaky on geographic smarts

Young Americans shaky on geographic smarts | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Despite the wall-to-wall coverage of the damage from Hurricane Katrina, nearly one-third of young Americans recently polled couldn’t locate Louisiana on a map and nearly half were unable to identify Mississippi.

 

This is not shocking news, and that is the problem.  

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Unaddressed Link Between Poverty and Education

The Unaddressed Link Between Poverty and Education | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Federal education policy seems blind to the relationship between poverty and student performance.

 

An interesting op-ed that focuses on the educational performance in the United States and poverty.  The authors feel that class is an obvious factor in educational performance, but that educational policies do not reflect the geographic factors that lead to uneven results. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mindy Tan's curator insight, February 22, 2014 9:44 AM

From this article, I can see that children that are poorer actually get lower results as compared to those that are well fed. I think it is because they dont have a good environment to study in, do not have well-educated parents to guide them along and teach them and most importantly, they are not well-fed and they do not have enough nutritions to help them think or concentrate better. I wonder why they would  put the 'rich' and 'poor' kids together? Putting them together will only result in the richer kids looking down on the poorer kids.

rlavinya's curator insight, February 23, 2014 8:26 AM

It saddens be that children can't be educated just cause of their lack of money.Poverty an educations plays a huge role in a child's life.WIthout education how are they gona lead in life?Why can't the poor be edcuated for free?

rlavinya's curator insight, February 24, 2014 8:02 AM

Education and poverty.In simple terms mostly if a child does not have enough money it'll affect their education. It saddens be that children can't be educated just cause of their lack of money.Poverty an educations plays a huge role in a child's life.WIthout education how are they gona lead in life?Why can't the poor be edcuated for free?What puzzles be the most is why isn't it free for those who cant afford it?

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Bridging the Digital Divide

This is an inspiring project that seeks to elevate poor slum-dwelling Indians by providing educational resources to children.  As free computer terminals are made available, their literacy skills soar and possibilities are widened.  Visit the projects homepage at: http://www.hole-in-the-wall.com/ ;


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, November 29, 2011 5:50 PM
This is a fantastic program that I'm excited to hear about...education for the disenfranchised is one of the best vehicles for positive social change.
Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 2:35 PM

As a child, most of us probably didn't particularly learn through technology or computers but through other hands on methods.  In these slums, getting school supplies which we are fortunate to have may not be so easy.  There are just so many people and living conditions make it harder for each child to be benefit equally.  That being said, these computers just might benefit the youth in the long run.  It might not be traditional, or even equal at times yet it is a type of improvisation that can probably be helpful.  In the video you could see the kids waiting in line, wanting to use the touchscreen, wanting to learn.  It is an abstract approach to education, but with the growth and diversity, it just might work effectively.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 16, 2014 8:15 AM

In the United States we take for granted the resources that are so easily accessed like computers. In this poor neighborhood in India, a computer was put in a wall and the children taught themselves how to use the computer. These slum kids don't have the tools needed to get out of poverty. Given them these computers may seem like a drop of water in the bucket but it is an important step.

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

More resources on Delicious...

More resources on Delicious... | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A fantastic AP Human Geography Teacher is compiling geography education links and thematically organizing them into 'stacks.'  It is still a work in progress but is reaching a point of being more useful and organized. Use either the 'stack' or links' to locate websites that are useful for AP Human Geography and other geography courses.  Good job David! 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Power of Place: Geography for the 21st Century

Power of Place: Geography for the 21st Century | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Power of Place: Geography for the 21st Century teaches the geographic skills and concepts that are necessary to understand the world. Geography educators and content experts from around the globe shed light on the physical, human, political, historical, economic, and cultural factors that affect people and natural environments. Maps, animation, and academic commentary bring into focus case studies from 50 sites in 36 countries."

 

A well-known resource for geography teachers, but the list would feel incomplete without this great archive of 26 videos from around the world.  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Geography of Educational Performance

The Geography of Educational Performance | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new report from the Department of Education puts all the latest educational data at your fingertips.

 

Partly geography education, but this link is more the geography of education within the United States.  The top 10 states are in green, with the bottom 10 in red.  What factors play a role in the distribution patterns visible?   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Global Concerns Classroom: Empowering Youth to take Global Action

Global Concerns Classroom:          Empowering Youth to take Global Action | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

For as much as geographic education "discusses" global issues and problems, we geography teachers often don't demonstrate how to make a different.   This site helps teachers show students how to make use of their education.

 

"I can't help everyone everywhere, but I can help someone somewhere."  That's the starting point for global awareness. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.