AP Human Geograph...
Follow
Find tag "ecology"
5.1K views | +0 today
AP Human Geography Education
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Sahel’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study.  Among the 22 countries making up the arid region in northern Africa, the population grew to 471 million in 2010 from 367 million in 2000, a jump of nearly 30%. As the population grew rapidly, the production of crops remained essentially unchanged.  Using satellite images to calculate annual crop production in the conflict-ridden Sahel belt, south of the Sahara desert, the researchers then compared output with population growth and food and fuel consumption."

 

Tags: Africa, Sahel, population, environment, water, ecology, environment depend, weather and climate, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 11:09 PM

This article discuses the increasing problem within Africa's Sahel, the increasing lack of food. The real cause of this is the fact the area is under constant strain both from nature as well as human conflict. As wars and conflicts continue more and more refugees are driven from their homes. This means less working on farms as well as more hungry people occupying this dry region. Unfortunately the way to solve this crises is to end the fighting which is not only incredibly difficult but bordering on impossible.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 10:57 AM

Several factors are posing a threat to life in the Sahel. The growing population is outpacing their food sources, and political instability and environmental change are adding to the tension. This region is home to not only the poorest nations but to some of the fastest growing populations in the world. While the situation in the region is certainly a problem, it shows that it will likely only get worse over time as the population continues to grow and food gets more scarce.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 11:46 AM

With the world population growing at a rapid rate, what will the food supply of some of these under developed countries look like when the expected population rate to hit 1 billion by 2050? In the Sahel, how are people going to use a desert like environment to produce crops that will feed its growing population? Its seems as if their problem is growing a rate faster than they can resolve.Will food plants be the new thing in their future?

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Frankincense production in dramatic decline

Frankincense production in dramatic decline | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
It could well be enough to make the Magi turn in their graves.

 

The ecology of frankincense production is not currently sustainable.  A research team from the Netherlands and Ethiopia said their new study had shown numbers of the Boswellia tree which produces the fragrant resin were falling due to fire, grazing and insect attack.  For more on the historical geography of frankincense, see: http://i-cias.com/e.o/frankincense.htm


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Next American City: Trees In Transit

Next American City: Trees In Transit | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Speed bumps, street markings, speed limits and other measures have all been used to create safer conditions for all users of the road. But what about trees?

 

A good link for discussing changes to the urban environment and city planning.


Via Ana Valdés, Seth Dixon
more...
elsa hunziker's comment, January 30, 2012 2:26 PM
Bucket list....
Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What would happen if humans became extinct?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 6, 4:37 PM

What would Earth be like if all humans suddenly disappeared? This question posed on the YouTube series Earth Unplugged, has many intriguing ecological and biogeographic ramifications that are worth considering to explore how systems are interconnected. 


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, video.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 10:29 AM

I find this youtube video interesting but for sure, the planet has become very interconnected with humans but that has not been a postiive effect. Humans have done nothing but manipulate the natural order of the ecosystem. If humans went extinct I would assume the earth would balance its self out.

Rescooped by Steve Perkins from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Places to See Before They Disappear

Places to See Before They Disappear | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
From Andalusia to Olympia, here are ten gorgeous places we might not have for much longer.

 

Some ecosystems are incredibly resilient in the face of climate change, while others are more vulnerable.  This slideshow looks at some of the most gorgeous, yet susceptible places on Earth. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lisa Fonseca's comment, October 17, 2011 11:13 PM
If these are some of the most incredible places on Earth why aren't we encouraging people or a way to help save these places. We have seen so many places get destroyed from natural disasters why aren't we trying to save these places. Also many of those places have a lot of tourism therefore it is essential we save them. Other places few but some I feel not many people would be familiar with. Why not inform people of what is going on. Finding way to help save these beautiful places.
Grammie's comment, October 21, 2011 12:20 AM
Ihave traveled to the most interesting and unusual places that we are aware of, what we need are leaders and people that are aware of these places that need saving, please help
Seth Dixon's comment, October 21, 2011 9:00 PM
I believe the "stewardship" metaphor for human environmental relations is an apt one, especially since misuse of the physical environment could most certainly place many decisions as making our societies as "bad stewards."