AP Human Geography Education
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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:29 AM

Looking at these photos reminded me of the video that we watched in class where water was rushing under a road and within minutes the road started to fall apart and eventually ended up completely divided in half. It is amazing how quickly the water can erode what is underneath and cause such damage to the road and area around it. Looking through the pictures it almost makes you nervous to drive on such a rode again because it all happens so quickly. It goes to show you just how powerful that water is to cause destruction like that. It is not easy to destroy a road like that. Again it goes back to the goegraphy. This type of thing doesn't just happen everywhere. Having a river like this presents the possibilities of something like this happening. Once is starts eroding it happens quick. A road that may look driveable one minute may be completely eroded 5 minutes later. It is amazing how a rush of water can cause such damage. Even if there are set systems to get the water through, sometimes the water rush is too powerful and breaks through and erodes the earth underneath anyway like we saw in the video in class. I have never seen anything like these picture before, and it really is amazing to see what can happen. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:59 PM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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The Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy

The Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
After cutting a destructive path through the Caribbean, Hurricane Sandy caused extensive damage along the East Coast this week.

 

While the damage wasn't as bad as many feared it could have been, place and spatial context are especially important in assessing the impacts of a natural disaster.  This is a excellent collection of the many devastating images as a result of Hurricane Sandy.  To see some more local images, Rhode Island Department of Transportation put this collection together.   


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 6, 2012 10:18 PM
I am speechless, these images have just torn my heart. Here in Providence, Rhode Island listened to multiple people say "oh this storm was nothing" they apparently need to view these photos, to understand Sandy was a monster of a storm. Mother nature is powerful and she can do just about anything. I am so mind boggled by the images, roads completely torn apart I never knew this could happen from a hurricane. It really made me appreciate how safe I was but now seeing these images really makes me want to get out there and tell more people to look at what happened in NJ,CT,NYC, and other places around the coast. My next step now is to get a donation bin started to send over to those states in major need. This is sure another natural disaster to go down in history.
Jordan Zemanek's comment, October 3, 2013 11:11 PM
Just with the information given, I can see how much damage the storm actually caused. Flooding and high winds obviously don't go together well. Although some communities weren't hit as bad as previously anticipated, some areas were largely damaged and the money needed to rebuild will be tremendous.
Alaina Rahn's comment, October 4, 2013 10:14 AM
I think it is very sad. I didn't know it was that bad. Now that I see those pictures it makes me feel very bad for those people.
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Why reconstructing Haiti has been so slow

Why reconstructing Haiti has been so slow | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Experts and aid officials discuss ongoing challenges and lessons learnt on the ground in Haiti...

 

Development and humanitarian aid projects must always take local geographic factors into consideration when devising any plan for the future.  Political uncertainty, poor transportation infrastructure, disease and not enough locally based programs are but a few of the issues that continue to plague the communities in Haiti. 


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Paige Therien's curator insight, February 13, 2014 7:06 PM

Haiti is in a prime "natural disaster" zone and it is difficult for a country to recover fully after each "hit".  Disaster after disaster begins to weigh heavily on an already struggling infrastructure, government, and hope.  The earthquake that Haiti experienced in 2009 was particularly devastating.  This article aims to shed some light on a few of the reasons why, two years later, Haiti was in pretty much the same condition.  Haiti's government was basically non-existent before this earthquake, and anything that did exist was quite ineffective at making decisions.  Bureaucratic procedures made incoming aid and their supplies move into Haiti extremely slow.  Some of it stopped coming altogether when cholera began to make a huge presence within the population.  As seen with this situation, as well as in other countries, uncoordinated aid and conflicting agendas of different organizations can do more harm than good.  Also, urban settings are extremely complex and can be puzzling to an outsider, particularly in times of desperate need.  When rebuilding, it is important to consider the future in terms of what else nature and location has in store for them.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 14, 2015 11:31 PM

There are a myriad of reasons for why “after almost two years…reconstruction has barely started,” but the lack of “local” help stood out to me the most. As the article mentions, the NGO’s have been responsible for taking care of Haiti’s relief efforts, most of whom are outside sources. On some level it isn’t surprising that the UN and NGO’s took the lead as their seemed to be no prominent leader in the country due to the lack of political stability mentioned in the article. However, for the outside efforts to “ignore” the actually population of the country just perpetuates the problem. As the people enforcing all the change, I consider the NGO’s to be more of a leader as they are trying to go about handeling the welfare of the nation (however misguided there attempts) as they are the ones calling the shots about what is done. Since they are doing work with no help, when they leave no one is around to lead once again because an atmosphere was never cultivated to encourage Haitian leadership.

 

Just throwing money at the problem without local support is also troubling because it doesn’t actually seem to be an effective met the needs of the population either. In the paragraph that discussed poor coordination, one sees a major concern is that groups are duplicating efforts of another group through the use of donations. We know this is happening without the “local community.” So one would think the people who actually live in the country would maybe know there country the best. Not the outside European relief efforts though despite the fact that they respond poorly to “urban settings” poorly. Time and time again, this has been a problem with the way developed countries respond to under-developed countries. I often think developed countries hold on to the success the IMF had with England after WWII, when throwing money at a situation actually worked. However, this isn’t the 1940’s anymore and there are many studies showing those methods just aren’t working (probably because the money isn’t being used correctly). As such, it should be time for a change in methods. Yet, it seems only the developed countries are capable of making that call and it’s not one they seem to be making anytime soon.

 

I am in no way suggesting the world just let Haiti be. One positive aspect of globalization is that communities in need can actually get relief from other parts of the world. Yet, in that same hand is the negative aspect. For that money is typically misused. Instead I propose that as a means to rectify the downside of globalization other nations work with the Haitian people to create a country that the Haitians can actually claim as their own. 

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New Zealand oil spill

New Zealand oil spill | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
View New Zealand oil spill pictures on Yahoo! News. See New Zealand oil spill photos and find more pictures in our photo galleries.

 

There are many geographic applications in this…Environment, globalization, economies of scale, etc.


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 26, 2014 2:28 PM

These images of the New Zealand oil spill are sad to see. It seems oil spills are occurring more and more throughout the world. Large ships holding oil should be inspected closely before going out to sea to prevent accidents such as this one from occurring. 

Market Talk's comment, September 16, 2014 1:47 AM
15/09/2014
Kea Petroleum PLC(kea) MEO Australia expected to spud and re-enter Puka-3 in late September
MEO Australia Limited has executed a contract with Drill Force New Zealand Ltd for the re-drilling of Puka-3.
Drilling of Puka-3 has been followed by a significant amount of analysis by both Kea and MEO of the logging information gained from the well. The drilling of the well has validated the geological model for predicting the location of thicker sands.
Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 10, 2015 7:19 PM

this is a major environmental problem. It will cost billions to clean up and it will end up at the expense of citizens all over the world as prices increase on products. If there is any major fines they do not take the hit consumers do.

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Sediment Spews from New England River After Irene

Sediment Spews from New England River After Irene | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Nearly a week after Hurricane Irene drenched New England with rainfall in late August 2011, the Connecticut River was spewing muddy sediment into Long Island Sound and wrecking the region's farmland just before harvest.

 

The effects of the flooding in Vermont and New Hampshire graphically manifested on the downstream parts of the watershed.  Good image for showing fluvial deposition and stream load.   


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Nic Hardisty's comment, September 4, 2012 12:04 PM
Fantastic image, One thing that isn't mentioned is the potential effect that this will have an marine navigation. With such a massive movement of sediment, it's hard to imagine that there won't be deposits left throughout the Connecticut River and Long Island Sound. This can have a tremendous impact on boats traversing the waterways, when a foot of sediment can be the difference between safe passage and running aground.
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Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service

Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service...

 

Will a river flood soon?  A very important local, and intensely geographic question.  This site has data for thousands of rivers in the USA, to assess when flooding might occur, and how severe the flooding may be .  This Hydrograph shows the Pawtuxet River in Cranston RI (from my neck of the woods).  Students can do more with data than we often allow them in classroom settings

(For national map, click on "RIVERS" under the NATIONAL tab). 


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ESRI's Interactive Hurricane Map

ESRI's Interactive Hurricane Map | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This interactive map in MUCH more powerful than the previously post one since it's managed by the GIS pros.  It allows you to view continuously updated hurricane information. You can track specific hurricanes Focused on Irene now) and see their projected path.


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Mammoth Storm Plunges NYC into Darkness

Mammoth Storm Plunges NYC into Darkness | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Subway tunnels and parts of the Financial District have been flooded...

 

The flooding has been as devastating as expected given the height of the storm surge, but this image of Ground Zero still is chilling. 


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Nat'l Geographic Video -- Hurricanes 101

Find out how hurricanes can be so destructive.

 

Not only will you learn about hurricanes but you can also watch videos about lighting, tornadoes, volcanoes, and overall everything about the weather. These are great videos to use in class when teaching units about natural disasters. These videos are full of great engaging facts.


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Carly Griffiths's curator insight, May 17, 1:04 AM

I absolutely loved watching these videos. I believe they would be a fantastic resource to show students or for students to use for research when exploring natural disasters. This site provides multiple videos on multiple different disasters. Each video provides great information and facts including, causes, when and where they are most likely to happen, the amount of damage, different sizes and speed and past examples. Each video provides such great visuals and explanation for these natural disasters. Students would be able to gain deep knowledge and understandings to support their research and/or investigation. I am currently in the middle of creating a task for my students using digital technologies such as this and incorporating collaboration through Wikis and blog. I plan to use these videos to further my students knowledge and encourage further exploration on these videos for their research.

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Tornado Satellite Imagery: Before and After

Tornado Satellite Imagery: Before and After | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Compare before and after satellite images of tornado damage in Alabama.

 

This is an older image from the Tuscaloosa tornado (April 2011) but still a powerful representation of natural disasters and their impact of both the environment as well as urban systems.   Using current geospatial technologies in the classroom helps to solidify the idea that geography is much more than "just capitals and landforms" in a student's mind. 


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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 1:06 PM

This certainly adds to the concept that geography is much more than capitals and landforms. Geography of a certain area can change someone's entire life, as seen for people who live in the tornado region. Natural disasters have a huge impact on the lives of many as we can see through the recent disasters the US has faced.  Geography not only helps to define these regions but how to detect the disasters and how to recover and collect data from them.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, September 11, 2015 9:23 PM

This interactive map gives you really clear insight into the damage a tornado can do. I found it amazing how clearly you could trace exactly where the tornado touched down and traveled. I had always imagined that their winds alone would just wipe out the whole town. While I am sure other structures in the area had impacted damage to, I was amazed at the difference in damage, between where it had traveled and the surrounding areas. There is a clear line of absolute complete destruction and just some damage. It looks like the tornado literally ripped up the ground wherever it touched...very neat. 

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Manslaughter trial of L'Aquila earthquake scientists will cause serious aftershocks

Manslaughter trial of L'Aquila earthquake scientists will cause serious aftershocks | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
This week, a committee of six scientists (including Dr Enzo Boschi, formerly president of Italy’s National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology) and one government official, whose role was to advise…...

 

To what degree to we rely on science? This trial has the potential to set a very harmful precedent should scientist not be able to mitigate disasters...science itself appears to be on trial. 


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Southern California hit by major power failure: An (UN)Natural Disaster

Southern California hit by major power failure: An (UN)Natural Disaster | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Failure of a major transmission line in Southern California has cut power to millions of people in the U.S. and Mexico, and electricity could be out into Friday, utility officials say.

 

I'm thinking of my family in San Diego, but after experiencing some electrical failures in Rhode Island due to Hurricane Irene, it got me thinking of a new geographic reality.  The way modern Americans live is entirely dependent on electrical energy that to experience a disruption is essentially the equivalent of a natural disaster.  This speaks to the human-environmental interaction "theme" of geography since most Americans can't sustain their lives for more than 72 hours without electricity.  We urbanites have detached ourselves from the land and "low-tech" to an alarming degree.  We've created a sitatuation that leads to (un)natural disasters without our technological gadgets that have become our necessities.  


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Irene's Punishing Rains Seen in 3-D

Irene's Punishing Rains Seen in 3-D | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Very cool visualizations...always nice to catch the student's eyes. 


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Uses of geospatial and GIS applications against disaster

Uses of geospatial and GIS applications against disaster | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Disaster management gis solution."  This impending hurricane is an excellent teaching moment to show the importance of geographic technologies and the relevance of a geographic education. 


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