AP Human Geography Education
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State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map?

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers.  Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, regions, gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, density.


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Population Density

"This talks about what population density is and why people live where they do."

 

Tags: population, density. 


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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, October 21, 2014 3:46 PM

Excellent short video defining and explaining population density. 

Catherine Pearce's curator insight, October 23, 2014 11:35 PM

A nice straight forward presentation

Bradley Hunkins's curator insight, October 28, 2014 6:55 PM

Why do people live in the locations they do and how can we impact our enviroment

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Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.

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Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 2014 5:05 PM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 30, 2014 2:31 AM

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 13, 2014 12:47 AM

APHG-U6

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Population Density

Population Density | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 4:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

michelle sutherland's curator insight, January 29, 2015 1:28 AM

love the map

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:50 AM

This is an interactive map that shows which parts of the world are most densely populated. It becomes very apparent to the viewer that the world is not evenly distributed at all. Places like China and India have a far higher population density than places like Russia. 

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The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth?

The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
What if you put all 7 billion humans into one city, a city as dense as New York, with its towers and skyscrapers? How big would that 7 billion-sized city be? As big as New Jersey? Texas? Bigger? Are cities protecting wild spaces on the planet?

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:12 PM

Its been known that Americans have lavish lifestyles compared to outher populous countries. In this article they show a represntation if the entire world lived like (had as much space) americans and it was astoudning. It would take 4 earths to fit the world if everyone had this lavish lifestyle. So we obviously need to change our ways. Cities ae very helpful to sharing this earth. They serve as a main hub so youll only have to ship to a few places. This with the shortening of distances would save tons of gas and othe rescources. But as the article states everyone living in a Main city wouldnt be possible because people need to produce outside the city. So in my opinion for this city world to work it would need to be a few megacities preferably one on each continent and for them to the city be surronded by production methods.

Bryan Chung's curator insight, May 9, 2014 12:40 AM

cool

Peter Hillman's curator insight, July 23, 2014 4:42 AM

An interactive site for comparisons of city sizes

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Mapping Population Density

Mapping Population Density | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
I found these cartograms from an article in the Telegraph and was immediately impressed. The cartograms originated here and use data from the Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project as to create the int...

 

This series of cartograms shows some imbalanced populations (such as the pictured Australia) by highlighting countries that have established forward capitals.  Question to ponder: Do forward capitals change the demographic regions of a country significantly enough to justify moving the capital? 


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Joe Andrade's curator insight, August 6, 2013 3:21 AM

Interseting way to visualy map population density.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:28 AM

It's a creative and vial way to map population density. 

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 8:24 AM

This is from 'worldmapper' - it is a great sight to help you understand using technology the most densely populated areas of various countries. What do you think they are? 

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80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks

80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The green dots on this map representing Starbucks locations which are obviously clustered in major metropolitan centers.  Cross-referencing this Starbucks address location with population data, Davenport explains his mapping technique: "By counting the number of people who live within a given distance to each Starbucks, we can measure how well centered Frappuccinos are to the US citizenry. In other words: draw a 1-mile circle around every store, then add up the % of the population living within the circles. Repeat for 2, 3, 4....100 miles."   The result of this data is a fabulous logrithmic S-curve which explains much about the American population distribution.   

 

Tags: statistics, density, consumption, mapping, visualization, urban.


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Rich's comment, October 10, 2012 6:26 PM
That is insane how large that corperation is.
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Mapping functional distance: the communte

Mapping functional distance: the communte | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

As described by Manu Fernandez, "MySociety developed this project that perfectly illustrates the utility of georeferenced data. Mapumental tool displays the travel time to reach a certain point from anywhere in the city, thereby helping to understand the temporal distance mobility, a much more useful and practical information than just physical distance."

 

This type of mapping shows the Space-Time Compression as well as the unevenness of that compression.  Why are some areas 'functionally closer?'  What makes some places 'functionally farther apart?'   How do technology, density and infrastructure influence this phenomenon?


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juanchosierrar's comment, December 19, 2011 10:10 AM
Excellent application of isochronism in geomarketing studies have great use with them we know the areas of influence at 5, 10 or 15 min.

This tool in combination with demographic data can be known potential areas of my future clients.

Currently working with a company in which we develop these products. I leave you some examples of isochrones lins.

http://cartoo.dyndns.org/

http://cabsa.wordpress.com/2011/11/24/geomarketing-areas-de-influencia-con-winab/

adeu
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:19 AM

This type of mapping shows the Space-Time Compression as well as the unevenness of that compression.  Why are some areas 'functionally closer?'  What makes some places 'functionally farther apart?'   How do technology, density and infrastructure influence this phenomenon?

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Urban Density and Design

http://www.ted.com How can cities help save the future? Alex Steffen shows some cool neighborhood-based green projects that expand our access to things we wa...

 

Urban density and design connected with energy usage and climate change. 


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Samantha Fuller's curator insight, September 27, 2013 6:44 PM

We think that the climate change has to do with using fossil fuels. And althogh creating a clean sourse of energy is a good plan it doesn't solve everything. Soon we will not be able to create enough energy for everyone who uses it.

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Sustainable cities must be compact and high-density

Sustainable cities must be compact and high-density | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
George Monbiot: As the balance of the world's population tips from rural to urban, we need strict urban planning to keep cities from collapse...

This article provides perspectives on the future of urbanization and the ecological framework within which we build our cities. 


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 10, 2012 1:47 AM
This article makes me think about the organization of urban demographics in Rhode Island. It puts into question the significance of the invisible lines that separate the boarders of Cranston, Central Falls, Pawtucket, Providence and East Providence today.
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Why Density Works

Why Density Works | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A study of 339 present-day hunter-gatherer groups demonstrated that after 'every doubling of population, the home ranges of [those] groups increased by only 70 percent': Every additional person requires less land than the previous one."

 

This is a very quick, but scientific explanation of why living in dense configurations works.  Not that it's without problems, but it's functionality in an era of population growth is clear.   

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 11:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 9:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, May 1, 2013 3:23 AM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map?

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers.  Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, regions, gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, density.


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How Many Flyover States Does It Take to Equal One New York City?

How Many Flyover States Does It Take to Equal One New York City? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Don’t let my New York City–centric comparisons hinder your imagination. The interactive at the top of this page lets you visualize how different parts of the country compare in population density.

Click the button at the bottom of the interactive to select Los Angeles County, for instance, and then click anywhere on the map to generate a (roughly) circular region of (roughly) equal population. The population data come from the 2010 census, and the square mileage was calculated by summing each highlighted county’s total area. You can also use New Jersey (the most densely populated state), Wyoming (the least densely populated state outside of Alaska), Texas, the coasts (the group of all counties that come within 35 miles of either the Atlantic or Pacific oceans), and, yes, New York City as the baseline for your population comparison."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, urban, density.


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Andrew Stoops's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:16 AM

This map is interesting in that flyover states is something that is not easily defined, at least by me. You could argue that no state is a flyover state because of the industry and businesses within the state itself. I am also curious to know why so few folks live in these areas as I have been to most of these places and they have the social and environmental pull factors important to migration.

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Ethnic/Population Density Map

Ethnic/Population Density Map | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, the map shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That's 308,745,538 dots in all."


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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 4:52 PM

This describes challenges to human migration because it shows certain areas that people have moved to opposed to areas that have less population because of climate, area, etc...

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:27 AM

This article shows the ethnic distribution across the US.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 25, 2014 5:30 PM

The Wired article's claim that this map depicts racial segregation instead of ethnic diversity can be seen in the patterns found in most of the major cities. While cities like Los Angeles and Las Vegas have many mixed areas containing different colored dots, other cities like Dallas and Atlanta show very clear cut lines between the ethnic makeup of areas. When zoomed out, the map certainly looks segregated with areas clearly marked blue, green, or yellow.

 

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Density and Emptiness

Density and Emptiness | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In the end of 2012 I travelled to USA to experience something new. And it was something I didn't expect: emptiness and density.  'Merge' is the last part of a project series 'Empty, Dense, Merge' which explores two opposite feelings through the photos of places located in USA.  In this project two opposite places are merged into one: New York City, where, it seems like everyone wants to live there, and Grand Canyon / Death Valley, which are unlivable."


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oyndrila's comment, July 21, 2013 8:37 AM
Excellent visual resource to convey the concepts.
John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 6:14 PM

Great photo combining the U.S.'s great spaces with its metropolisis'.

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 13, 2013 2:17 AM
Amazing it almost looks lkike we, in the US, are living in a huge bowl
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Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 10:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 4:06 PM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 6, 2014 8:47 PM

(in-class 4: Hong Kong)

What I take away from this is the theme of supply and demand. Though these condiions seem stereotypically negative, it seems like those who live in the photographed homes are relatvely well off (food, TV, clothing, etc.). This supports the view that living in these tight conditions is less of a choice and more of something that has to be put up with. Now that Hong Kong has been developed 'across', it'd be a good guess to say that recently investments have been made to build 'up' with highrises and skyscrapers (unless like Dubai they sat to mak either own islands, whic geographically would be less likely here). The questionof sustainability is also an issue, i.e. at what point will it be impossible to cram in any more inhabitants? I wonder if a future migration / spreading-out into other areas has started to occur yet or will soon, like the suburbanization which occured in the U.S. after the advent of the automobile. If so, would it be mainland China, despite the political tensions?

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 11:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 9:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, May 1, 2013 3:23 AM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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London Urban Form 3D Map

Visualisation of the density and function of the built-environment in Greater London 2010. Shows the dominance of the intensifying city-centre, corridors of commercial development and the smaller scale centres in Outer London.

 

This is a fantastic way to visually comprehend the spatial urban patterns and densities of a world city like London.


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Day vs. Night population maps

Day vs. Night population maps | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A great image for showing the pulsating rythmns of a dynamic urban system.  We treat population density as a static metric, but how many people are in a given place would truly be difficult to fully quantify.  What logisitic difficulties would this shift present for cities?  


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Wildcardspades58's comment, December 16, 2011 4:44 PM
I would be interested to find out how these were created and how the data was recorded.
Darius Kidd's comment, August 27, 2013 3:44 PM
There is not much Definiton on this map......
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Detroit: The 'Shrinking City' That Isn't Actually Shrinking

Detroit: The 'Shrinking City' That Isn't Actually Shrinking | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
We're often told that Detroit has been abandoned—but the metro area is stable, and addressing sprawl is still a challenge...

 

Population size and physical size...not always as correlated as one might assume in this age of urban sprawl.  This details some of the difficulties in revitalizing abandoned sections of a city when the economic motive to expand outward is so easy. 


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Wyatt Fratnz's curator insight, May 27, 2015 1:59 AM

This article investigates the possibilities of the progression of the city of Detroit, despite all the negative connotations. They show us the math behind it's decreasing populations along with it's past expansion, what's behind it and the urban sprawl of it all.


This is a great real-world example of uneven development, zones of abandonment, disamenity, and gentrification. It goes to show how all of these factors afflict with the city as a whole.

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Large Cities: Where the Skills Are

Large Cities: Where the Skills Are | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Human progress, to a large degree, has depended on the continual expansion of social networks, which enable faster sharing and shaping of ideas. And humanity’s greatest social innovation remains the city.

 

Urban networks depend on increasing interaction and collaboration...and it pays off.  This article details the correlation between population size of a city and the earning potential of its citizens.


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Seth Dixon's comment, October 6, 2011 2:36 AM
My pleasure!
Thomas Robson's curator insight, May 20, 2014 1:34 PM

This article details the correlation between population size of a city and the earning potential of it's citizens. Human progress, to a large degree, has depended on the continual expansion of social networks, which enable faster sharing and shaping of ideas. And humanity’s greatest social innovation remains the city. As our cities grow larger, the synapses that connect them—people with exceptional social skills—are becoming ever more essential to economic growth."The bars on this map show three types of job skills—analytic, social, and physical. The height of each bar is a measure of the average mix of skill within a given city’s labor force—the higher the bar, the more advanced the skill level within that city." 


The fact that the article call them all city is an example of Urban Hierarchy, a theory discussed in our AP Human Geography Urban Unit. This article does not touch on any of the zone models we learned in our unit. The article is able to show through this map that the more analytic jobs there are in a cities Central Business District the higher the average pay the city has. (As evidenced by New York and Boston being much higher then say Albuquerque).  

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One Path to Better Jobs: More Density in Cities

One Path to Better Jobs: More Density in Cities | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Building more housing in cities will make them more dense, but everyone will benefit.

 

This is an interesting op-ed that focuses on urban density patterns and the economic structure of the jobs available in the city.  Good to use when discussing economies of scale, market threshold, agglomeration, etc. 


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morgan knight's curator insight, March 10, 2015 2:15 PM

A more dense city might be more productive, but will it always be able to stay that way? A city that is in the middle of a boom will attract a large amount of people seeking jobs, which in just a few years will overpopulate the urban area. It may be better to stay in the suburbs, or even maybe the rural areas of the U.S. Continue to build America's cities, and create more space for people to move into for work.