AP Human Geography Education
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NASA animation of temperature data from 1880-2011

Tags: video, environment,  visualization, climatechange, environment modify. 


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Feeding 7 billion & our Fragile Environment

Feeding 7 billion & our Fragile Environment | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This photoessay puts together a diverse set of issues that are interconnected.  Industrial agriculture and metropolitan pollution; rising energy prices to sustain consumptive lifestyles with environmental degradation linked to oil spills; regions susceptible to climate change and regions producing that change...thought-provoking.  


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Daniella Tran's comment, February 21, 2013 11:03 PM
I had always known that the amount of humans on this planet was way too much, but i had never realized that our daily consumption of all these resources can result in the issues that are shown in these pictures. These pictures show areas that are highly polluted and it is overwhelming to think that the beautiful earth that we live in is filled with images like that. The number of factors that affect our environment is countless, especially with the growing figures of pollution, waste, use of natural resources and food production. The photo that stood out to me the most from this collection, is the one where the polar bear had to resort to eating a polar bear cub. It is difficult to think that the polar bear did that act as a sign of desperation because of the lack of food affected by the changing environment.
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Countries must plan for climate refugees

Countries must plan for climate refugees | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The world's governments and relief agencies need to plan now to resettle millions of people expected to be displaced by climate change, an international panel of experts said on...

Climate change and political geography should merge, but unfortunately not in this way. 


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Coral Reefs Most at Risk

Coral Reefs Most at Risk | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new map ranks the world's coral reefs by the risks they face from warming oceans, overfishing and other stress factors, which will help scientists focus on conserving the reefs with the most likely success.

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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 9:00 PM

With this know fact of Coral Reefs at risk for disappearing, what are we to do. I believe in order to preserve our coral reefs around the world, more education on the importance of having the coral reefs on our coast. While there is little things we can do in regards to the rise of temperatures, we can reduce our human activity on the coast such as fishing and coastal development.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:28 PM

This map makes me think the beginning of the semester when you were showing us all the different ways maps can look based on the data. I never would have choose to make a map based on the coral reefs, but clearly there is a need for one. I don’t fully understand the math behind all the variables that shows how this map was made, but given the amount of variables mentioned in the article I think this is a very comprehensive map. So even though other maps may come up with different results, I would stand by this one due to the sheer volume of information analyzed.

 

I hope that the map is able to actually save some of the reefs around the Middle East and Australia (the highest risk areas) because I couldn’t even begin to imagine the damage the disappearance of one would have on the ecosystem. I know the article mentioned that the some of the prime factors were "surface temperature" and "ultra violet radiation," which supposedly couldn't be helped. However, I learned in my GEO 100 class that increase in surface temperature and ultra-violet radiation relates to global warming, Since global warming is partially man made, I do wonder why the prime factors can't be managed more though. Or is it that the impact of global warming can't be revered quickly enough so the ones most damaged are too far gone? Regardless, hopefully some of the other factors can be controlled enough to make a difference. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:07 PM

This map of the coral reefs that are in the most danger shows that the Polynesian reefs are the most t risk. This is due to warming sea temperatures and overpopulated fishing. The second being the area of the Carribbean. This is a area of constant sunlight which is good for the reef but at the same time can be bad because of the warming of the sea temperatures. 

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Agriculture and Rural Development Day UN Climate Talks

Agriculture and Rural Development Day UN Climate Talks | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Farmers are at the forefront of dealing with climate change around the world. How are they coping, and what opportunities do the shifts present?

 

An excellent set resources discussing the plight of farmers various regional and ecological situations.  From the famers in Mozambique impacted by unreliable rainfall to Guyana farmers at risk from rising sea fells, climate change is impacting the most vulnerable (and the least responsible) the hardest.  


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Skeptic’s own study finds climate change real, but we should be critical

Skeptic’s own study finds climate change real, but we should be critical | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON — A prominent physicist and skeptic of global warming spent two years trying to find out if mainstream climate scientists were wrong. In the end, he determined they were right: Temperatures really are rising rapidly.

 

Objective science is quite unifed...global temperatures are rising.  Arguing that point is simply unscientific and factually inaccurate.


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Places to See Before They Disappear

Places to See Before They Disappear | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
From Andalusia to Olympia, here are ten gorgeous places we might not have for much longer.

 

Some ecosystems are incredibly resilient in the face of climate change, while others are more vulnerable.  This slideshow looks at some of the most gorgeous, yet susceptible places on Earth. 


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, October 17, 2011 11:13 PM
If these are some of the most incredible places on Earth why aren't we encouraging people or a way to help save these places. We have seen so many places get destroyed from natural disasters why aren't we trying to save these places. Also many of those places have a lot of tourism therefore it is essential we save them. Other places few but some I feel not many people would be familiar with. Why not inform people of what is going on. Finding way to help save these beautiful places.
Grammie's comment, October 21, 2011 12:20 AM
Ihave traveled to the most interesting and unusual places that we are aware of, what we need are leaders and people that are aware of these places that need saving, please help
Seth Dixon's comment, October 21, 2011 9:00 PM
I believe the "stewardship" metaphor for human environmental relations is an apt one, especially since misuse of the physical environment could most certainly place many decisions as making our societies as "bad stewards."
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Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service

Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service...

 

Will a river flood soon?  A very important local, and intensely geographic question.  This site has data for thousands of rivers in the USA, to assess when flooding might occur, and how severe the flooding may be .  This Hydrograph shows the Pawtuxet River in Cranston RI (from my neck of the woods).  Students can do more with data than we often allow them in classroom settings

(For national map, click on "RIVERS" under the NATIONAL tab). 


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