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Women and Land Infographic

Women and Land Infographic | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Landesa partners with governments and local NGOs to ensure the world's poorest families have secure land rights, which develops sustainable economic growth and improves education, nutrition, and conservation...

 

Globally speaking, women are the primary agricultural workers yet rarely own land. 


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Michael Crumpton's comment, March 20, 2013 8:38 PM
I'm not quite sure i understand why the woman aren't allowed time saving technalogy if it is they who till the fields. Why is that?
dilaycock's comment, March 21, 2013 1:30 AM
I think the answer lies in the patriarchal nature of many societies in the developing world. Women provide the labour, but are not in a position to make decisions about management of the land. This situation is exacerbated by gender inequities regarding access to education.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 5:27 PM

New portion of the AP HUG Outline regarding Women in Agriculture

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Photos that bear witness to modern slavery

TED Talks For the past two years, photographer Lisa Kristine has traveled the world, documenting the unbearably harsh realities of modern-day slavery.

 

This is a chilling glimpse into the worst and darkest side of the economic systems of geography and labor in the world. It is estimated that there are more than 25 million people who today live in state that can be described as modern-day slavery. We should not discuss slavery only in the past tense, and yet it conflicts with how most people conceptualize the world today.

 

Questions to Ponder: How can this even be happening in the 21st century? What geographic and economic forces lead to these situations portrayed in this TED talk? What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today?

 

Tags: TED, labor, economic, class, poverty, South Asia, Africa, video.


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Kyle Toner's comment, November 6, 2012 12:17 PM
This video truly opened eyes into the conflict of modern day slavery. I had no idea just how prevalent, global and horrible this situation is.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2013 10:51 AM

This is a chilling glimpse into the worst and darkest side of the economic systems of geography and labor in the world. It is estimated that there are more than 25 million people who today live in state that can be described as modern-day slavery. We should not discuss slavery only in the past tense, and yet it conflicts with how most people conceptualize the world today.


Questions to Ponder: How can this even be happening in the 21st century? What geographic and economic forces lead to these situations portrayed in this TED talk? What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today?


Tags: TED, labor, economic, class, poverty, South Asia, Africa, video.

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The Unaddressed Link Between Poverty and Education

The Unaddressed Link Between Poverty and Education | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Federal education policy seems blind to the relationship between poverty and student performance.

 

An interesting op-ed that focuses on the educational performance in the United States and poverty.  The authors feel that class is an obvious factor in educational performance, but that educational policies do not reflect the geographic factors that lead to uneven results. 


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Mindy Tan's curator insight, February 22, 9:44 AM

From this article, I can see that children that are poorer actually get lower results as compared to those that are well fed. I think it is because they dont have a good environment to study in, do not have well-educated parents to guide them along and teach them and most importantly, they are not well-fed and they do not have enough nutritions to help them think or concentrate better. I wonder why they would  put the 'rich' and 'poor' kids together? Putting them together will only result in the richer kids looking down on the poorer kids.

rlavinya's curator insight, February 23, 8:26 AM

It saddens be that children can't be educated just cause of their lack of money.Poverty an educations plays a huge role in a child's life.WIthout education how are they gona lead in life?Why can't the poor be edcuated for free?

rlavinya's curator insight, February 24, 8:02 AM

Education and poverty.In simple terms mostly if a child does not have enough money it'll affect their education. It saddens be that children can't be educated just cause of their lack of money.Poverty an educations plays a huge role in a child's life.WIthout education how are they gona lead in life?Why can't the poor be edcuated for free?What puzzles be the most is why isn't it free for those who cant afford it?

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Dangerous work

Dangerous work | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Guatemala City, a place called "The Mine" can deliver both a means of survival and a grisly death. Every day, dozens of residents salvage a living by scouring the massive dump for scrap metal.

 

This thanksgiving I'd like to discuss one of my goals in teaching a geography course in the developed world. I hope to cultivate a sense of thanksgiving and gratitude for the many good things that are easy to take for granted. Balanced with that, I try to teach that economic disparities are NOT a function of moral, mental or physical superiority.  Therefore I try to instill a sense of thankfulness that does not become boastfulness or entitlement--hopefully that ethos will infuse this day's festivities. Happy Thanksgiving!


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sdion's comment, January 30, 2012 2:23 PM
makes me thankful for the jobs i have. i also wonder what the health side effects are of working in these locations. are the workers experiencing shorter life spans or anything like that?
Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 12:28 PM

As someone who has scoured dumps for things before, this sounds like no fun at all! You can find a lot of cool things that are left at dumps, but this doesn't even begin to compare to what they're facing at "The Mine". The smell and possible injuries must be overwhelming. If left untreated, a cut from anything in one of these places could prove fatal.

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Where the 1% Live

Where the 1% Live | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The richest Americans are gathered in a handful of metropolitan areas...

 

Spatial analysis shows that that 1% are not only economically clustered, but also geographically clustered in a handful of major metropolitan areas. 


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NYTimes: Wall Street Protest Shows Power of Place

NYTimes: Wall Street Protest Shows Power of Place | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Occupy Wall Street is a potent reminder of the ancient civic ideal of public space, and how far we have drifted from it in the modern era.

 

"Imagine Zuccotti Park, one protester told me, as a Venn diagram of characters representing disparate political and economic disenchantments. The park is where their grievances overlap. It’s literally common ground."  Posted in many sites, but since this article treats the important of place as its central point, it merits reposting.  This article also situates the current protests within a deeper historical context as so many movements have 'taken to the streets.'  


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America's Fertility Class Divide

America's Fertility Class Divide | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Since the average American woman has 2.1 children, you might think we aren't experiencing a national fertility crisis.

 

This article effectively conveys the global trend of lower fertility rates coinciding with higher rates of female education, wealth and development.  As a bonus, it shows that within a given country, fertility rates are not uniform, but vary between demographic classes. 


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Seth Dixon's comment, September 28, 2011 10:42 AM
My pleasure...
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 24, 2:24 PM

In the article, Lerner details why the United States' healthy birthrate of 2.1 children per woman is a deceiving number. While other first world nations like England and Germany are suffering from overall low birthrates, the United States is suffering due to the low birthrates in high-income brackets and high birthrates in low- income brackets. This discrepancy is reinforced by a lack of paid leave laws for new parents in the US, making having a child a burden for potential parents with aims of furthering their careers. Similarly, lower income women do not have enough access to publicly funded family planning programs.

 

This dichotomy in birthrates in the US will likely have a negative effect on the nation's economy going further. If most of the nation's children are being born into poor families the next generation of Americans are more likely to have worse access to education and be unable to obtain higher paying jobs than if the birthrate were more uniform across income brackets.

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Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans

Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus over the past few years, according to local officials, border experts and demographers.

 

The migration from Mexico to the USA has slowed tremendously in the 21st century, but due to the drug violence, the demographic profile of the migrants has changed significantly. 


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Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 1:22 PM

Despite Mexico making improvements to make Mexicans want to stay below the border. The drug trafficking violence does make people want to leave. Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans, wealthy businessmen and average Mexicans are fleeing Mexico and have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus, and they're being warmly welcomed, unlike the much larger population of illegal immigrants. Mexicans are fleeing cartel wars that have left more than 37,000 Mexicans dead in just 4 years, 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2:12 PM

This article is interesting because we were used to seeing poorer immigrants from Mexico looking for work and a new way of life.  However, the more affluent communities are migrating North to the U.S. and legally because of the turmoil of the drug wars in their country.  It is disappointing to see that drugs, violence and murder are pushing away people from their own country

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 3, 1:23 PM

For more affluent Mexicans the ability to migrate north is much easier than for the poor. They have the money and the skills to move into the United States. Also with the open lines of communication and ease of flux with business over the border make moving to the U.S. an excellent way to avoid being caught in the cross fire among drug cartels. For the poor however they are either forced to find work with the cartel or risk being an innocent bystander. It also makes you think about the terminology we use to describe Mexican immigrants, are they not refugees of this drug war?

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The Hidden Cost of Counting the Homeless

The Hidden Cost of Counting the Homeless | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A professor criticizes the "culture of quantification," (in the journal cultural geographies) arguing that we don't do enough with the data we collect.  If all we do is count (or attempt to count the homeless), does that help them in any way or change the realities that lead to homelessness?  Are we counting them just to give us the numbers to receive credit that may help other programs but not help the homeless?  Is data for data's sake of any value?


UPDATE: Another geographer noted some other issues of homelessness on the website facebook page, specifically in regard to this map of homelessness: "A problem associated with this map is that while the numbers get smaller, it raises the question: where did they go? (answer: Hollywood, after an emphasis on policing pushed them out)...this could be tied in to a discussion about map scale."

 

Tags: statistics, class, census, socioeconomic, housing, poverty.


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India’s Boom Creates Openings for Untouchables

India’s Boom Creates Openings for Untouchables | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
India’s era of economic growth has created something unthinkable a generation ago: business opportunities for members of India’s untouchable caste, the Dalits.

 

Critics of globalization often site that globalization has changed indigenous cultures around the world and mourn the 'impurities' in these societies.  Is all cultural change a bad thing?  This article shows one way that global capitalism has been helping (some of) the poorest of the poor within India.  How is globalization connected to cultural changes within any given society?  How is capitalism changing a formerly 'immobile' social structure?    


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Map of the Day: America's Poverty Belt

Map of the Day: America's Poverty Belt | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The poor in the U.S.are disproportionately clustered in a handful of southern states...

 

This image is worth an entire class period of economic geography...


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How Economic Inequality Harms Societies

"http://www.ted.com We feel instinctively that societies with huge income gaps are somehow going wrong. Richard Wilkinson charts the hard data on economic inequality, and shows what gets worse when rich and poor are too far apart..."


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Everyone Is 'Middle Class,' Right?

Everyone Is 'Middle Class,' Right? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new study finds that ignorance of one's relative standing in the income distribution is not unique to Americans, and looks at the policy consequences of such misperceptions.

 

The terms high-class and low-class have such strong negative connotations that everyone seeks to be perceived as middle class.  What income bracket are you in?  The research says it'll probably be a surprise.  Data for income bracket is the USA: http://taxpolicycenter.org/numbers/displayatab.cfm?DocID=2879


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, October 17, 2011 10:59 PM
I do not believe everyone is considered to be middle class. I think that is a false statement. I truly believe in the phrase "rich get richer, poor get poorer" I consider myself and my family working middle class. Our income isn't incredibly high but it is average. We have money for food, clothing, bill paying and essentials but also have the extra to travel, and spoil ourselves. That is where the difference lies between middle, low, and high class incomes. The lower class may only make money to support their selves and family with food. As for the high class they have money to do anything they want. Pay bills, buy the essentials. Although they get to have dinner out every night, buy the fancy cars and clothes. The low class may live a stressful like as the high class live a glorious life.
Seth Dixon's comment, October 17, 2011 11:14 PM
Everyone most definitely is not a part of the middle class and Catherine Rampell of the NY Times does not believe that (as I interpret her) but is using that hyperbolic statement to make the point that more people SELF IDENTIFY with the middle class than can actually be there. I think she agrees with your "rich get richer" since her main point is that this self-identification with the middle class obscures the rising social inequity in America. I agree too. Thanks for your comments!
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The Geography of Educational Performance

The Geography of Educational Performance | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new report from the Department of Education puts all the latest educational data at your fingertips.

 

Partly geography education, but this link is more the geography of education within the United States.  The top 10 states are in green, with the bottom 10 in red.  What factors play a role in the distribution patterns visible?   


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Mother Jones magazine: Economic inequality in the USA

Mother Jones magazine: Economic inequality in the USA | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A Harvard business prof and a behavioral economist...

 

This is an interesting graphic highlighting the strong economic imbalance in the United States, and that the imbalance is much greater than most citizens (and presumably students) believe it to be. 


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'Where Children Sleep'

'Where Children Sleep' | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
James Mollison wanted to portray children's diverse worlds. What better way to do so than to photograph their bedrooms?

 

Pictures with the children and the space they inhabit, creates a more personal touch to geographic context for students.  It builds what I call "geographic empathy," which builds on commonalities, instead of just reinforcing stereotypes.   


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