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State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map?

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers.  Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, regions, gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, density.


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Local Population Pyramids

Local Population Pyramids | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

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Mrs. K's curator insight, August 27, 7:13 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 8:27 PM

Useful for explaining population pyramids.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 16, 12:08 PM

Unit 2

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Linguistic Diversity at Home

Linguistic Diversity at Home | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Counties where at least 10 percent of people speak a language other than English at home."


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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 10, 2013 11:02 PM

This map does not bring many surprises.  Places where there are a lot of Spanish speaking families are present in places where many Spanish people immigrate to, along the Mexican border and the southern tip of Florida, where Cuba is close by.  One interesting thing about the French areas seen in Louisiana is that their version of French is a regional dialect. Not only is their a cluster of French speaking families, but they are all speaking a language native to the region.  It is very surprising that there are not as many French speaking families along the Canadien border.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, September 26, 11:34 AM

This map shows how linguistically diverse the United States is today. This map reminded me of one of the slides that we went over in class about how in the Northwest Region the predominant language was German and now it is mainly English, with some German and Native American languages still spoken in certain parts.

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 26, 10:29 PM

This data is very interesting because you can see that most of these statements speak Spanish. I noticed that most people who speak another language at home (in this case Spanish)  besides English are located in the south western of United States. I wonder if this has something to do with people who immigrated to U.S  from south America.

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Redistricting

How can cartography swing an election?  Simple.


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Miroslav Milosavljević's comment, July 27, 2013 5:56 PM
This great video example may serve students for a better understanding the term. Well done!
Dean Haakenson's curator insight, July 28, 2013 10:40 AM
Thanks Seth Dixon for Scooping this! And thanks Mr. Burton for rescooping. Great lesson for government and geography.
Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:14 AM
this video shows the process from which political candidates win their respective elections. gerrymandering is an illegal use of power in the respect to redistricting and moving town lines in order to pump up voting power. this is an illegal action that happens countless times in elections and taper to higher powers. this gerrymandering idea takes the voter power to elect and puts it into the hands of the actual political personnel. by reshaping you can stack votes into one particular area this way you are guaranteed to win that district. this is where you see districts with these crazy shaped areas rather than nice square or other simple shapes.
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Interactive Map: The Economy Where You Live

Interactive Map: The Economy Where You Live | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The fallout from the recession has cut deeply into the housing security, employment and income of many Americans. But some parts of the country are clearly faring better than others.

 

Do your own local and regional analysis of household incomes, unemployment and foreclosure rates.  What patterns surprise you?  What geographic factors explain the economic situation?     


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Racial Profiling on an “Industrial Scale”

Racial Profiling on an “Industrial Scale” | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

FBI Using Census Data to Map and Police Communities by Race: "The ACLU uncovers an FBI program that pairs Census data with 'crude stereotypes' to map ethnic communities."

This is not an impartial article, but the issue of cultural bias and profiling in "objective analysis" raises some serious questions.  What is appropriate to map?  By whom?  For what purposes? 


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GIS student's comment, November 3, 2011 4:24 PM
This article reminds me of what we discussed in the beginning of the semester when we discussed some of the potential problems with GIS. Some of those problems included using maps to and google earth to examine what people are doing with certain certain land that they own. The article discusses how information can be represented in an unconstitutional way. The question is then raised, is it appropriate to map such information and who should be able to see this map? I personally don't believe that the GIS portion should be targeted. When the FBI gathers this information its much different from when they represent the same data with a map.
cookiesrgreat's comment, November 3, 2011 4:29 PM
Reminds me of WWII when they arrested Japanese Americans for potential terrorist acts. The security of this country is A1 however we can not cross over into areas where we become like the countries that are out to destroy us. Lets not rot from the interior. The census data is for the census only. Yes
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 8, 2012 10:27 PM
Their is to much emphasis on reacting to crime and not enough effort put into investing into programs that can prevent it. This lack of understanding in what causes criminal activity makes discrimination much easier. The government should be focusing more on reducing factors that cause crimes such as low education levels and scarce job opportunity if they really wanted have a positive impact.
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Census count finds decreasing white population in 15 states

Census count finds decreasing white population in 15 states | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Non-Hispanic whites make up a dwindling share of the nation’s population, as their numbers drop in the Northeast and Midwest and grow slowly in the South and West.

 

A while back we looked at the changing demographics of black America, now it's time to look at the changes in white America. Why is this happening? What economic, cultural, demographic and political factors contribute to this pattern? What push factors and pull factors are at work?

 

Also, look at the interactive graphic, with mappable census data from the last 30 years, aggregated at the county level, or even block level. Link at: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/nation/census/2010/


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Interactive Map: Where Americans Are Moving

Interactive Map: Where Americans Are Moving | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
More than 10 million Americans moved from one county to another during 2008. The map below visualizes those moves. Click on any county to see comings and goings: black lines indicate net inward movement, red lines net outward movement.

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Mark V's comment, August 27, 2012 11:15 AM
I thought this was interesting showing the flight from the northeast and midwest
Natalie K Jensen's curator insight, January 30, 2013 10:45 AM

This is a dynamic illustration of international migration in the US that fits nicely within Chapter 3.

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State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map?

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers.  Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, regions, gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, density.


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America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts

America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A brief overview of crimes against geography in the 113th Congress.

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 10:04 AM

This concept is used to favor certain political parties in certain areas. There are rules like the ditrict has to be all connected but they can manipulate the redrawing to make it that a certain party still wins that district.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:29 PM

A showing of the gerrymandering districts of the most absurd kind.

Gerrymandering bases itself off the place of the districts in an attempt to sway voting in favor of one party or another or even for the most equal by dealing with similar human characteristics.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 30, 3:15 PM

unit 4

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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

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The Hidden Cost of Counting the Homeless

The Hidden Cost of Counting the Homeless | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A professor criticizes the "culture of quantification," (in the journal cultural geographies) arguing that we don't do enough with the data we collect.  If all we do is count (or attempt to count the homeless), does that help them in any way or change the realities that lead to homelessness?  Are we counting them just to give us the numbers to receive credit that may help other programs but not help the homeless?  Is data for data's sake of any value?


UPDATE: Another geographer noted some other issues of homelessness on the website facebook page, specifically in regard to this map of homelessness: "A problem associated with this map is that while the numbers get smaller, it raises the question: where did they go? (answer: Hollywood, after an emphasis on policing pushed them out)...this could be tied in to a discussion about map scale."

 

Tags: statistics, class, census, socioeconomic, housing, poverty.


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Religious Geography of the United States

Religious Geography of the United States | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A set of 2000 census maps that focus on religion in the United States.  Even in secular societies, religion can play an important role within society, both culturally and politically.  Include are links to many more religious maps.  


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Rebecca!Morgan Geography's curator insight, November 21, 2013 1:30 PM
Geography- these maps show the diverse religions and the distribution of them.
Andrew and Tom's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:11 PM

This map shows the consentration of religion in the US and how ut mainly is in the south.

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NYTimes: Battles to Shape Maps, and Congress, Go to Courts

NYTimes: Battles to Shape Maps, and Congress, Go to Courts | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The once-a-decade process of drawing Congressional districts has prompted lawsuits in more than half the states over issues like partisan gerrymandering and accusations of discrimination.

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Anneli's curator insight, November 9, 8:12 PM

EXTRA CREDIT 

Gerrymandering- manipulating the boundaries of an electoral constituency to favor one party or class. 

 

This article talks about many lawsuits related to redistricting, have been put against  in more than half the states, asking judges to decide whether or not new maps take "partisan gerrymandering too far or discriminate against minority voters."

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WSJ Census Map Maker

WSJ Census Map Maker | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Draw your own district...

 

An easy way to have students work on a neighborhood projects and still get them to have a cartographic component to the project.  A Facebook or Twitter account is needed to login (but that isn't to difficult to manage in most classroom settings). 


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User Friendly GIS for U.S. Census Data

User Friendly GIS for U.S. Census Data | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Mapping America: Every City, Every Block."  Browse local data from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey, which was conducted from 2005 to 2009.  This is super easy to use for students accustomed to internet browsing. 


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