AP Human Geography Education
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Disputed Isles

Disputed Isles | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Competing territorial claims have led to maritime disputes off the coast of Asia. See a map of the islands at issue.

 

This is an nice interactive map that allows the reader to explore current geopolitical conflicts that are about controlling islands.  This is an good source to use when introducing Exclusive Economic Zones, which is often the key strategic importance of small, lightly populated islands.   

 

Tags: EastAsia, SouthEastAsia, political, unit 4 political, territoriality, autonomy, conflict, economic. 


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:40 PM

This interactive page gives relevant information about islands that are disputed over in southeast Asia.  I liked it because you could see the information in context with the map.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:47 PM

This is like a game of Monopoly when people try and get all the houses or businesses. Except this is real life and real isles. Whose is whose? How does Asia decide where and how the EEZ's should be divided.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:05 PM

considering that half of the nations involved are island nations, this is hardly surprising. every nation has issues with their neighbors. even the us and Canada dispute some territory. but these disputes can hardly end as well, when half of these nations have fought wars with each other for most of their histories.

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Palestine is but one of many aspiring to the United Nations

Palestine is but one of many aspiring to the United Nations | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Admission to the General Assembly of the UN is not open to all. The Palestinian Territories are just one of several regions without a seat at the world's top table.

 

Palestine's bid for statehood and international recognition is making the political geography definition for state all the more relevant?  What is a state and what is not?  What function does UN membership play in the process of statehood and sovereignty?


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Kendra King's curator insight, May 3, 2015 2:19 AM

In order to be recognized as a sovereign entity from the UN the country must have the full vote of the UN acknowledging that the state exists. However, given the set up of the security counsel, that makes becoming a state really hard. Currently, China & Russia oppose Europe and the United States' desires and vice versa. As the article shows, the  countries seeking statehood outside of Palestinian all seem to have one member of the team on board, but not the other. As such, I don't foresee recognition in the future anytime soon.

 

The whole limbo status, is astonishing to be. I find it weird that a place, like Palestine, can have a flag and a national language, and many other elements of most countries, but not be a country as the article mentioned. From this angel, it amperes international acceptance is the most important factor. This made me wonder, even if the security counsel did have similar interests would accepting any of the nations in would be a good idea? Many of the countries that want to be admitted are from the former soviet union block, which as mentioned in class is often shattering among ethnic groups. However, due to all of the different ethnicity and people within the region, how many smaller countries should be carved out when these were accepted? Also, at what point does this just create further instability?

 

As much as I don't agree with the UN security counsel excluding the voices of the developing world, the current set up does block hastily adding new countries to the world. Given the present too many new nations could set in unstable regions, this might be better for the world. Or I could be wrong because skirmishes could continue until someone recognizes a party. Since I don't want to keep play the what if game, I am just going to end by saying that if the security counsel is ever change, the geopolitical consequences would need to be analyzed heavily. This situation alone is case and point.     

Savanna Smith's curator insight, April 28, 11:44 AM
This article relates to our chapter because it it talking about what is and what is not a state. My opinion on this is that a Palestine should have to have certain factors to be considered a state.
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The Conflict in Syria

The Conflict in Syria | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Brown University's Choices Program has many excellent resources for social studies teachers including "Teaching with the News."  Many teachers are seeing the importance of Syria, but might lack the regional expertise to put it in context or to the time to link it with the curriculum.  If that is the case (and even if it is not), this is the perfect place to find lesson plans on the ongoing Syrian conflict. 

 

Tags: political, MiddleEast, conflict, war.


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Countries that will support Palestine's UN bid for statehood

Countries that will support Palestine's UN bid for statehood | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Imgur is used to share photos with social networks and online communities, and has the funniest pictures from all over the Internet.

 

This map is incredible...it highlights the importance of not just how many supporters you have, but WHICH supporters are in your corner. 


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Kmcordeiro670's comment, February 2, 2012 5:24 PM
This map highlights the complexity of geopolitics in our modern times even further when set along side the current Syrian situation. The Palestinian conflict seems to be more social and political, the Syrian conflict has a much broader scope in terms of resources at risk. Thus if this was asking supporters of the Syrian resistance the giant mass of Russia must be dropped as a supporter, the same of Saudi Arabia. They have a much large stack in Syria remaining tyrannical for economic and regional issues then if Palestine was De-colonized.
Derek Ethier's comment, October 25, 2012 10:46 PM
This fact that this map displays how "Western" nations (NATO, U.N., Australia, etc.) are the only nations to deny the Palestinian bid for statehood shows how divided our world is today. Western nations dominate the world's landscape, though China has gained a great amount of power over the past decade or so. In reality, Palestine probably does deserve statehood. National boundaries should be drawn around ethnic lines. It some cases this is impossible, as in this case. The support Western Europe pledges to Israel on this issue is obvious and this is but another reason why tensions increase between the Middle East and the Western world.
Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 21, 2013 10:57 PM

The map is amazing and so are some of the comments that go along with it.  The countires in grey though I think have been mislabelled.  The US would want a Palesinian state as long as it is not under the control of a terrorist group and one that will acknowledge the the State of Israel has the right to exist.  It is amazing to see that they want the right of statehood but they are unwilling to grant that right to the people of Israel.  Its also amazing to note that many of the countries in green do recognize Israel and its right to exist.  This land has been under the control of many different people over the centuries and borders have been drawn and redrawn over and over.  It is time to sit down, talk like human beings and come to a solution.  Is it going to happen???  Probably not in my lifetime or my kids...history is just repeating itself again!