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Linguistic Family Tree

Linguistic Family Tree | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor. An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian).  Minna Sundberg, creator of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent, a story set in a lushly imagined post-apocalyptic Nordic world, has drawn the antidote to the boring linguistic tree diagram."


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 11, 2014 3:21 AM

Linguistic Family Tree

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:50 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Patterns and Processes (Language)

      The image shows how many languages are related and have many common ancestors. Languages are grouped into language families and are even more broadly categorized.

      Language is a huge part of culture and it is the way that people communicate amongst each other. There are hundreds of languages in our world, but as globalization and pop culture diffuse many languages are being lost and no longer spoken. A good example of a dead language would be Latin. Many of our common day languages trace their roots back to Latin, but no one speaks Latin anymore.

Cade Bruce's curator insight, March 19, 7:09 PM

This falls under the category of language because it shows the origin, relationship, diffusion, and geography of different religions. It can also be used to tell how specific words originated by knowing the language it branched from.

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Density and Emptiness

Density and Emptiness | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In the end of 2012 I travelled to USA to experience something new. And it was something I didn't expect: emptiness and density.  'Merge' is the last part of a project series 'Empty, Dense, Merge' which explores two opposite feelings through the photos of places located in USA.  In this project two opposite places are merged into one: New York City, where, it seems like everyone wants to live there, and Grand Canyon / Death Valley, which are unlivable."


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oyndrila's comment, July 21, 2013 3:37 AM
Excellent visual resource to convey the concepts.
John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:14 PM

Great photo combining the U.S.'s great spaces with its metropolisis'.

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 9:17 PM
Amazing it almost looks lkike we, in the US, are living in a huge bowl
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Ephemicropolis

Ephemicropolis | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

If you have over 100,000 staples, you can create an startlingly creative rendition of an urban landscape (well, Peter Root could).   It is interesting how our cultural and historical context shape what we see as a human landscape.  I can't help but think that if I lived 2,000 years ago this uneven jumbled metallic mass wouldn't remind anyone of any place they'd ever been. 

  

Tags: art, urban, landscape, unit 7 cities, historical.


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Don Brown Jr's comment, October 1, 2012 9:42 PM
This video makes me think what other simple items or objects cause us to automatically associate with modernization and urban environments today such as Styrofoam cups. It also makes me wonder how certain tools and objects can be more strongly associated with different time periods, people, cultures and environments.
Don Brown Jr's comment, October 1, 2012 9:42 PM
This video makes me think what other simple items or objects cause us to automatically associate with modernization and urban environments today such as Styrofoam cups. It also makes me wonder how certain tools and objects can be more strongly associated with different time periods, people, cultures and environments.
Don Brown Jr's comment, October 1, 2012 9:42 PM
This video makes me think what other simple items or objects cause us to automatically associate with modernization and urban environments today such as Styrofoam cups. It also makes me wonder how certain tools and objects can be more strongly associated with different time periods, people, cultures and environments.
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Earth from Above

Earth from Above | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

I'm a huge fan of Yann Arthus-Bertrand's artistic aerial photography.  This image of Rio de Janeiro and the favela is a striking one. I am also posting this to show the how easy the website justpaste.it is to use.  Students with no website creation training can produce sharable materials online.  Now this isn't the most professional outlet, but I envision some middle school or high school students producing a class project that can be transformed into something that reaches a bigger audience as it is shared with a broader community. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, images, art, worldwide, K12, edtech.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, September 26, 2012 10:16 AM
This is a striking image. So much poverty purposely hidden behind the mountain, away from the tourists of Rio de Janeiro. It's a shame they have to live the way they do, there is no help from them from their country.
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Map as Art

Map as Art | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are many amazing examples of artists who turn to cartography and geography for inspiration. Whether through the lens of a camera, paint, ...

 

This series of cartographically-inspired art works changes how we look at maps.  Some of these artists also make us think of places that are on the Earth as explicitly "mappable" features.  I think the Google Maps push-pin in the city center is my favorite.  Which do you prefer? 

 

Tags: art, mapping, place, cartography. 


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GeoMapGames's curator insight, March 4, 2014 12:47 AM

Amazing map art! I like Google Maps push-pin in the city center :)
Which do you prefer?  #geomapgames

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Ingrid Dabringer’s Map Paintings: Finding Whimsy in Geography

Ingrid Dabringer’s Map Paintings: Finding Whimsy in Geography | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a great gallery of clever artwork that puts the "art" in cartography (The Earth without art is just "eh"). 


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Crafting Globes

Crafting Globes | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
'Tis the Season describes some of the opportunities in geography education offered in the Bridgewater State University Department of Geography. In Dr. Vernon Domingo's class, what might look like fun and games is actually ...

 


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World's Most Amazing Bridges

World's Most Amazing Bridges | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Geography is not just about natural landforms. Urban structures are also equally fascinating. For today, let's...

 

The discipline of geography is about making the connections, bridging the gaps between various facets of Earth.  These 15 iconic landscapes play a strong role in how people remember place...gorgeous pictures.


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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:34 AM

This article is interesting because it talks about considering bridges as landforms. Although bridges are not natural landforms they are indeed man made landforms. The appreciation for bridges come from the means that they provide as well as their beautiful structure. The bridges a lone form their design allow people to connect and interact with one another so bridges are also viewed as a tool for connect people as well.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 29, 12:42 AM

It's really interesting that the Brooklyn Bridge is number 1. Being a former New-Yorker myself, I am fascinated by the old-fashioned looking structure of the Brooklyn Bridge. This bridge has a cable wire web-looking pattern that helps hold the bridge together and before the 1950s and it use to be useful for trains and streetcars. Now, it not only looks great but it's very useful because it allows six lanes of cars, a walkway for pedestrians and a couple of bike lanes for bikers. All of them make their way from Brooklyn to New York City and back.
This is a photo I took of the Brooklyn bridge towards Manhattan.

https://www.facebook.com/JaJoSchneiderPhoto/photos/pb.579649308750192.-2207520000.1422509199./698888010159654/?type=3&theater

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Beautiful Illustrations of Where Flickr and Twitter Are Used

Beautiful Illustrations of Where Flickr and Twitter Are Used | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

These stunning images show globalization, urbanization, digital interconnectivity and development through geotagged images (from Eric Fischer).


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Linguistic Family Tree

Linguistic Family Tree | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor. An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian).  Minna Sundberg, creator of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent, a story set in a lushly imagined post-apocalyptic Nordic world, has drawn the antidote to the boring linguistic tree diagram."


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 11, 2014 3:21 AM

Linguistic Family Tree

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:50 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Patterns and Processes (Language)

      The image shows how many languages are related and have many common ancestors. Languages are grouped into language families and are even more broadly categorized.

      Language is a huge part of culture and it is the way that people communicate amongst each other. There are hundreds of languages in our world, but as globalization and pop culture diffuse many languages are being lost and no longer spoken. A good example of a dead language would be Latin. Many of our common day languages trace their roots back to Latin, but no one speaks Latin anymore.

Cade Bruce's curator insight, March 19, 7:09 PM

This falls under the category of language because it shows the origin, relationship, diffusion, and geography of different religions. It can also be used to tell how specific words originated by knowing the language it branched from.

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Map Envelope

Map Envelope | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Print your own customized, place-based envelopes using Google Maps imagery. 

 

UPDATE: Noted UK geography blogger Alan Parkinson has created lesson plans that follow a similar trajectory, getting student to work with Digimaps.  The lesson plan is available here in PDF format.  

 

Tags: art, google, mapping. 


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Tiny Capital

Created by Eirik Evjen.  The production of this video was made out of 76,940 single photos.

 

"Norway has recently reached 5 million inhabitants and the capital is growing rapidly. The city scene in Oslo is steadily thickening with taller buildings, more people and the never-ending construction sites. Being by far the most populated city in Norway with 613 000 inhabitants, most Norwegians look to Oslo as a major capital. However, if one compares Oslo to other international capitals, Oslo only ranks as the 112th largest. Oslo is indeed a major capital, just a small one…"

 

Tags: art, urban, Europe, landscape, unit 7 cities.


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:39 PM

Oslo may be small in size, but it is quickly growing and advancing. Norway's capital is now a place of constant travel and exploration. The 76,940 photos used to create this video embrace Oslo's city rush and functionality. 

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61 Amazing Manhole Covers from Japan

61 Amazing Manhole Covers from Japan | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Manhole covers are ubiquitous in the modern urban fabric; they are typically drab and purely utilitarian.  In Japan, municipalities take pride in the this ordinary piece of the landscape and convert them into extraordinary works of art that reflect the local people, place and culture. 

 

Tags: book review, landscape, art, urban, culture, place, EastAsia.

 


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2014 6:00 PM

This is a great take on art and the ways of celebrating Japan with touches of personal findings and ideas. These manhole covers are cheery and reflect a piece of Japan that not only tell stories, but embrace history.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 3:17 PM

While many would consider it silly to turn something as ordinary as manhole covers into pieces of art, I believe that it is an amazing way to represent the culture of a place. Different townships and neighborhoods in Japan have distinct designs that relate to that place. This acts as an artistic expression of the characteristics of that place, since the designs are often chosen and designed by the people of that place. Some covers show historical events, animals, and even religious symbolism. I would love to flip through the book and try to imagine why each place chose each design. 

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Earthscapes

Earthscapes | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The U.S. Postal Service celebrates the beauty and diversity of America's landscapes as seen from above with the Earthscapes (Forever®) stamps.Offering an opportunity to see the world in a new way, the 15 stamps are issued in 3 rows of 5, showing 3...

 

These stamps are the perfect way to decorate your letters while showing your love for the Earth and geography. 

 

Tags: images, art, landscape. 


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Lake Baikal Land Art

Lake Baikal Land Art | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Land artist Jim Denevan has created the world's largest work of art to date. Spanning 31-km-sq, the project is a 'drawing' on the frozen surface of the Siberian Lake Baikal.  Follow the link for a 2 minute video on the production of the art. 


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The only wallpaper worth having...

The only wallpaper worth having... | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Multitasking, taken to the extreme...


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Interactive panoramic view of Paris

Interactive panoramic view of Paris | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

From the Eiffel Tower, you can pan and zoom to see the whole city.  This could be a fantastic 'hook' for an urban geography class.  Paris has been the model for so many urban restructuring projects, that this would work nicely as grist for discuss centering on ideas of urbanism (and it's just stunningly gorgeous).  Enjoy playing with this as it is very easy to manipulate and control.   


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elsa hunziker's comment, January 30, 2012 2:19 PM
Feels like you're there! Love this!