AP Human Geography Education
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Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops

Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Corn, watermelon, and peaches were unrecognizable 8,000 years ago.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 28, 2014 1:25 PM

I think the term 'artificial' in the image might be misleading and it depends on your definition of the word.  Humans have been selectively breed plants and animals for as long as we've been able to domestic them; that is a 'natural' part of our cultural ecology and has lead to great varieties of crops that are much more suitable for human consumption than what was naturally available.  Long before climate change, humans have been actively shaping their environment and the ecological inputs in the systems with the technology that their disposal.  This is a good resource to teach about the 1st agricultural revolution.     


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, March 22, 2015 9:39 PM

This article shows how crops were entirely different 8,000 years ago. It shows how much we have breeded and affected the natural crops. With the example of peaches, watermelons, and corn, the article shows how the natural crop didn't taste as good and was a lot smaller. The natural peach had 64% edible food; whereas the 2014 peach had 90% edible food. The pictures comparing the natural and artificial crops also illustrated how the many varieties of that specific crop had grown and where the crop is found has grown. Lastly, the diagrams compares the water and sugar percentages. This article paints a good picture as to how much mankind has affected our land and agriculture. Also, how much our crops have changed due to selective breeding.

 

The article gives a good illustration of topics in Unit 5: Agriculture, Food Production, and Rural Land Use. The article shows how selective breeding has affected many crops. It gives a good view as to how selective breeding and agriculture has been affected and changed in the Neolithic Agriculture Revolution. The article explains what what life was like and how it changed in the Neolithic times. This article is really interesting in showing how crops were changed.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:41 PM

I think the term 'artificial' in the image might be misleading and it depends on your definition of the word.  Humans have been selectively breed plants and animals for as long as we've been able to domestic them; that is a 'natural' part of our cultural ecology and has lead to great varieties of crops that are much more suitable for human consumption than what was naturally available.  Long before climate change, humans have been actively shaping their environment and the ecological inputs in the systems with the technology that their disposal.  This is a good resource to teach about the 1st agricultural revolution.     

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:53 AM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:48 PM

Unit 2-Population

 

This video was about the growing population in the world and as a result the growing food demand. This video points out that even though more food production seems like the solution, instead other solutions are more logical. Solutions include reducing wastes, preserving forests, being more productive on current farms and more. It states that farming is a huge business but it goes towards more than growing food for people to eat but also for other things like animals and materials. The worlds population is growing and there needs to be a change in food industries to keep thriving. 

 

This relates to unit 2 about population since it is thinking of ways to adapt to the worlds growing population. By 2050 it is predicted that population will increase by 33% and something has to change about food in order for people to stay fed. There is too much food being wasted that if that could be decreased it could make a huge difference. The video made a good point that it's not that we need more food it's that we need to manage and prioritize production.  

Blayze Padgett's curator insight, January 10, 1:03 PM

The article/video relates to AP Human Geography because it involves Thomas Malthus's theory that population is going to surpass food production if we don't fix our priorities. In my opinion this article makes a very valid point that could be true. We don't exactly need to start more farms and spread agriculture, instead, we should pay attention to our priorities and make the right decisions with the food we harvest from agriculture.

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Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming?

Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Minnesota, ‘industrial’ operation shows effort to balance economic, environmental sustainability.

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:33 AM

The large-scale agricultural practices of modern America tend to lend to the bad image of commercial farming. However, the practices are actually helping feed more people in the US, but they also use genetically modified crops and other highly debated techniques.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:45 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:56 PM

In the long run, a successful farmer needs to find a balance between economic and environmental sustainability.  Some big farms are working towards that so the 'big-equals-bad' narrative about agriculture may be easy, but it doesn't tell the whole story about modern agriculture. 

 

Tags: GMOssustainability, agriculture, agribusiness

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Factory Food From Above: Images of Industrial Farms

Factory Food From Above: Images of Industrial Farms | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Feedlots, a new series of images crafted by British artist Mishka Henner, uses publicly available satellite imagery to show the origins of mass-produced meat products."

 

Tags: Food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.  


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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:35 AM

British artist Mishka Henner took photographs and enhanced the colors of feedlots to reveal the agribusiness of meat production. Photographs of feedlots are considered illegal and the legal repercussions of Mishka Henner are not clear at the moment, but the photographs are shocking and reveal again how little Americans know about their food production. 

Americans have changed the places and utilized them to build agribusiness empires and have introduced new problems to the landscape of feedlot and farming towns.

 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:46 AM

This article makes me sickened. With previous knowledge of factory farms I know of the horrors that go on but this takes the cake. These pictures shown in the article depict the chemical and waste spill off which I am absolutely sure this is NOT good for the environment.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:56 PM

Beautiful imagery at one scale tells an unsavory story at another.

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Rethinking Agriculture

"Growing Power is a national nonprofit organization and land trust supporting people from diverse backgrounds, and the environments in which they live, by helping to provide equal access to healthy, high-quality, safe and affordable food for people in all communities."

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:56 AM

with the increasing numbers of urban citizens in years to come the key to success in the city will be its ability to adapted to its growing enviroment. It would be nearly impossible for cities to exsit in the future with the current ways of agriculuture, there needs to be a change in the way things are done. Thats why this next gen way of agriculuture is going to take off in urban areas. with the ability to have full farms on rooftops the city will be able to self sustain itself more properly than it does in current times.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:40 PM

For the past three years I have had the luxury of having a garden in my backyard, it is a lot of work but there is nothing better than knowing where my food is coming from. I enjoy going in my backyard and being able to grab vegetables whenever I need them. I also go to farmers markets for vegetables that I don't grow in my own garden.  I would defeniately support local people to get good quality food. 

Lauren Shigemasa's curator insight, January 23, 2014 1:28 AM

a powerful way to increase access to healthy foods! this organization called Growing Power is using urban gardening not only to create a sustainable food source for its neighbors, but also provides a system so we can donate and send a week's worth of fresh fruit/vegetables to any surrounding community in need. so amazing!

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Breakfasts Around the World


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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:03 AM

These pictures are very interesting and makes you think about the kinds of breakfast you saw when growing up. These pictures allow us to see the kinds of food cultivated in these areas of the world and how they interprete the use of each one. The pictures also show us how each place is related. For example, some of the dishes looked alike in that most of the plate was breads. It makes you wonder where that tradition came from. These pictures also let the viewer in on the development or wealth of the country. Some countries only have a piece of bread and a coffee for breakfast, where other places have huge platefuls of all different kinds of food. Does the amount of food you eat for breakfast have to do with how developed your country is? Food seems so simple, but it can lead to many different interpretations for people. 

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 21, 2013 9:17 AM

Typically when I think about different cultural foods I think about lunch or dinner rather than breakfast. When I think about Italy I think about meatballs, pasta, pizza, and gelato. When I think about Germany I think about a lot of meats. However what never really comes to mind is breakfast. Breakfast is one of my absolute favorite meals on the day. I love going out to breakfast and getting some eggs, homefries, sausage, and maybe even a grilled blueberry muffin. This summer I traveled to Italy and that was the first time I realized that breakfast is just as different in their Culture as their lunch and dinner. It was interesting how different things were. They had toast and yogurt, but the yogurt didn't taste the same as it does in America.  It is amazing how different each countries breakfast is in comparison to what we are used to. Some things we consider lunch might be served in another countries breakfast meal. For example Deli meats. It is interesting to see how different each culture really is. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:10 AM

Countries each have their own foods that are unique and freshly made by families everyday. They use foods that are frequently grown and found in the area to make their meals. For example china eats a lot of fish because it is part of their culture. Also people of spanish and mexican cultures are known for cooking spicy delcious foods. Food is apart of what creates cultures.

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Japan's Geographic Challenge

Stratfor examines Japan's primary geographic challenge of sustaining its large population with little arable land and few natural resources. For more analysi...

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Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:51 AM
Unlike other larger, more geographically diverse countries, Japan is faced with the problem of a general lack of farmable land and natural resources. The fact that the country is itself an island does not make things any easier for it in an economic sense. The way the country is divided up also makes for a difficult political situation, as mountain ranges create division, and therefore, political disunity.
The proximity of the Korean peninsula and China to Japan is also important to examine. Whenever Japan wishes to acquire natural resources and other economically beneficial materials, Korea is the conduit through which Japan tends to invade the mainland, usually China. Because of this, we can see how Japan’s geographic location may cause strained relationships with its neighbors, both politically and economically. Alienating two of its closest neighbors would clearly be a disastrous move for Japan, but it may be seen as necessary due to its unfortunate geographic location.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:31 PM

It would make sense to me that for a place like Japan to sustain itself successfully, it would have to have some help from other areas with more resources.  Again with the concept- people don't choose to be born, or where they are born... To be born in Japan is as unchosen by that person as it would be in any other country.  I don't think people should have to pay for resources that they do not have available, especially because they are on an island/island chain that simply doesn't have what they need.  I am really repulsed by the bartering system because of absolute indication of beyond excessive surplus and profit and greed and all that garbage that humanity reeks of.  Yeah some people are happy, but we could be completely unburdened of all negativity if we banded together to rid the world of negativity itself.  I know that Japan would be happy to receive everything that they need for no cost, but I also know that many people would be willing to work, and more willing to work, if they didn't have expenses to pay for... it would really be serving their life's purpose as a component of humankind if they worked to help others, rather than to pay their monthly rent.  I don't have a clue how I would go about organizing a movement to transform this idea into a reality, but I'll work on that.  In the mean time, I would advise supranationalism for Japan, and hope that with the alliance of other countries, they can band together and make deals that work for the greater good of their country, population, and the world.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 10:58 AM

This short video did a great job in explaining why Japan became expansionist in the decades leading up to WW II.  The mountainous nature of the islands and lack of arable land challenges Japan to provide food for its people.  To understand Japan you must understand her geography, this helps to understand why a country acted the way it did in the past and can be a predictor of future actions. 

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Women and Land Infographic

Women and Land Infographic | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Landesa partners with governments and local NGOs to ensure the world's poorest families have secure land rights, which develops sustainable economic growth and improves education, nutrition, and conservation...

 

Globally speaking, women are the primary agricultural workers yet rarely own land. 


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Michael Crumpton's comment, March 20, 2013 8:38 PM
I'm not quite sure i understand why the woman aren't allowed time saving technalogy if it is they who till the fields. Why is that?
dilaycock's comment, March 21, 2013 1:30 AM
I think the answer lies in the patriarchal nature of many societies in the developing world. Women provide the labour, but are not in a position to make decisions about management of the land. This situation is exacerbated by gender inequities regarding access to education.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 2014 5:27 PM

New portion of the AP HUG Outline regarding Women in Agriculture

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Harvest

Harvest | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Harvest is a time of plenty, when the season's hard work is rewarded by bounty. Many of the rhythms of our lives are shaped by the gathering of crops, even if most of us now live in cities.

 

This photo essay shows people from around the world harvesting their crops and taking them to the market. Pictured above, farmers who were waiting for customers gathered alongside corn-laden trucks at the market in Lahore, Pakistan earlier this month.

 

Questions to Ponder: What is similar in these images? What is different? How do those similarities and differences shape the geography of a given region?

 

Tags: Food, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, worldwide, comparison, images.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 16, 2012 6:59 PM
The similarities in this photo are the type of people. From my observation, and the fact that corn is being produced and delivered to the markets, I would say these farmers are native Mexicans. These similarities shape the geography of a region, because we are aware of what Mexican culture includes - the land's productionof corn and its indigenous people having the characteristic of a darker shade of skin.
Don Brown Jr's comment, September 18, 2012 6:31 PM
How we cultivate crops can reveal a lot about the society we live in. The scale of agricultural production can show us the socio-economics behind who in society does the cultivation and the technological level or resources available to the society that cultivates it. Some of the differences depicted in these harvest pictures tells me that in lower developed societies cultivation can be associated with tradition and rural surroundings while in developed nations it is more industrialized. However the pictures also show the similarities of how agricultural production overlaps into other aspects of society in some nations more than others. Also another similarity I see is that cultivation is still a very social practice and requires the cooperation and coordination of many people.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 9:17 AM
This is a very inspiring picture. What we see is the product of labor. If men will only cooperate and work together, we will have an abundant world, no famine, no war. In this picture, I still see a lot of people missing. With only a few people working, we see a lot of products. Therefore, if many people will work together, we can expect more products.
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Urban Agriculture Sprouts in Brazil’s Favelas

Urban Agriculture Sprouts in Brazil’s Favelas | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Urban Agriculture Sprouts in Brazil’s Favelas - Organic agriculture is a growing trend in big cities around the world, including Latin America, and no...

 

This article nicely ties two commonly taught issues in human geography that aren't the the typical combination: 1) the growth of organic farming and 2) the spread of squatter settlements and slums in the developing world. 

 

Tags: agriculture, food, urban, unit 5 agriculture, unit 7 cities. 


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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 12:03 AM

This is a new trend spreading to Brazil. Now with the organic craze that has been going around in past years farmers have sought out way to grow their food more organically. This also allows poor areas to benefit from organic farming because it is now present in their area and they can no buy food that is good and of their choice. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 21, 2014 10:19 PM

Seeing how even Urbanized areas of the world can get into agriculture shows that you do not need to have geographic land advantage to grow crops. The Brazilian favelas are getting into agriculture to bring extra income and a sense of community to the area, getting more agriculture into these urban areas will be aided by the government in order to keep the urban agriculture movement growing

Tiphaine Graton's curator insight, October 12, 2016 3:54 AM
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NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner

NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Americans ate 475 million pounds of tilapia last year, making this once obscure African native the most popular farmed fish in the United States.

 

Industrial farming, human-introduced species, GMOs, outsourcing and environmental impacts are but some of the relevant themes from this video.  How are global taste buds reshaping the geographic landscape? 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 25, 2013 9:04 AM

Industrial farming, human-introduced species, GMOs, outsourcing and environmental impacts are but some of the relevant themes from this video.  How are global taste buds reshaping the geographic landscape?


Tags: GMOsindustry, food, agriculture, agribusiness,

 

Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 25, 2013 12:44 PM

My concern is how safe is bioengineered food?  How has its nutritional content been altered?  Until some of our questions about bioengineered food can be answered by the FDA and other government officials I remain leery about the potential side effects that might occur from eating it and wonder how nutritious it really is.

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:59 AM
The video discusses how now alot of countries are industrially farm raising their fish. Tilapia is a perfect example Americans ate 475 million pounds of Tilapia last year. Ten years ago you would never even hear about Tilapia because it was not a popular fish. Times have changed how they raise them and then ship them out the video shows one of the farms where they grow the TIlapia.
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UN warns land degraded, farm production must rise

UN warns land degraded, farm production must rise | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
ROME — The United Nations has completed the first-ever global assessment of the state of the planet’s land resources, finding in a report Monday that a quarter of all land is highly degraded and warning the trend must be reversed if the world’s...

 

Population growth and food production are obviously linked.  Thanks to folks at ESRI, this theoretical issue can be made much more concrete for our students using geospatial technologies. 

Examining 5 crops of the world using GIS:
http://edcommunity.esri.com/arclessons/lesson.cfm?id=472

Examining 4 crops of the USA using GIS:
http://edcommunity.esri.com/arclessons/lesson.cfm?id=416


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 3, 2013 6:18 PM

Population growth and food production are obviously linked.  Thanks to folks at ESRI, this theoretical issue can be made much more concrete for our students using geospatial technologies.  You can examine 4 crops of the world using GIS with this ArcLesson on the ESRI Ed Community site.

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Urban Agriculture: Industrial-Sized Rooftop Farm Planned for Berlin

Urban Agriculture: Industrial-Sized Rooftop Farm Planned for Berlin | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
It is hardly a logical spot for a farm, but three Berliners have earmarked a massive former factory roof for an unusual urban agriculture venture.

 

Urban agriculture within an industrial landscape is reshaping our cities, food systems and rural areas. What economic factors are making this happen?  What cultural factors explain the growth of this phenomenon?  


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Mr. Gresham's curator insight, April 10, 2014 10:19 AM

I wonder what Von Thunen would think of this!

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Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Sahel’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study.  Among the 22 countries making up the arid region in northern Africa, the population grew to 471 million in 2010 from 367 million in 2000, a jump of nearly 30%. As the population grew rapidly, the production of crops remained essentially unchanged.  Using satellite images to calculate annual crop production in the conflict-ridden Sahel belt, south of the Sahara desert, the researchers then compared output with population growth and food and fuel consumption."

 

Tags: Africa, Sahel, population, environment, water, ecology, environment depend, weather and climate, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 5:59 PM

with the strife in this region it is hardly surprising that it is hard to maintain food supplies in the face of large scale immigration. in a region where it is hard to survive, immigration would be a massive threat, straining already thinly spread resources.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:22 AM

If a country has a big population growth, the resources that it has if they are already scarce may become devastating. As the population of Sahel does increase, the amount of food resources will not have the proper time to react to the growth. Granted it may take a while for agricultural crops to grow and many citizens may face hard times facing finding food, but their hardships will be overcome by farmers trying to produce more crops to help ease that hardship.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:38 PM

this seems like an alarmingly common problem in the world today with population growth happening at an alarming rate in many parts of the world. most notably india and china. as well as in sahel, if your population grows by 100 million in 10 years it will be impossible to keep up and be able to provide for that many people in such a reletively short time.

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Why The U.S. Chills Its Eggs And Most Of The World Doesn't

Why The U.S. Chills Its Eggs And Most Of The World Doesn't | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In many countries, eggs aren't refrigerated and they're still considered safe to eat. But in the U.S., we have to chill them, because we've washed away the cuticle that protects them from bacteria.

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aitouaddaC's comment, September 22, 2014 5:16 PM
Amazing !
Gareth Jukes's curator insight, March 24, 2015 10:38 PM

Variations of major zones and effects of markets-

 

This article describes why the U.S is one of the few countries that actually refrigerates their eggs. This is beacuse we had washed away the cuticle that protects eggs from bacteria. In other countries, they just leave eggs like how they were laid.

 

This article contributes to the idea of variations of markets by explaining how our country is one different from most of others by eggs. It also explains why we are one of the few that must chill the eggs, unlike other markets and/or venders.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:44 PM

For many Americans that are traveling abroad for the first time, realizing that eggs aren't in the refrigerator is a bit of a culture shock (not to mention the moment they find milk in a box that also isn't being refrigerated).  Agricultural practices dictate storage requirements and some things we might have imagined were universal are actually place-specific or peculiar to our cultural setting.  What we are taught to think of as gross, appropriate, attractive or even sanitary is often steeped in a cultural context.  So is it strange the we refrigerate our eggs in the United States, or that they don't in other places? 

 

Tags: food production, technology, industry, food, agriculture, perspective.

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Harvest 2013

Harvest 2013 | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
From grains to grapes to cabbage and many other crops the harvest season has been in full swing in the Northern Hemisphere.

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 6, 2013 2:47 PM

Well see as how my page is called World Photography, i figurd this would be a good article/gallery to put up. Along with so georgous photos one can really see the imporance of farming on a culture and farming world wide. The gallery of photos is increadible, and with a caption to match each photo you are able to see geographilycly and cultulary where certan foods and plants are produced. This makes me feel  that cultures are all some what connected, the tobbco from your cigretts comes from mexico, and the nice wine that you drink when your out to dinner is from a vineyard in germany. Its a small idea but food is very cultualy influncing 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 2:09 PM

After reading this article it became apparent the back breaking work that these people have to endure just to stay alive and feed their family. Which is insane when you think about our society today, I dont know about you but I do not farm and do this type of work after I'm done with my school work everyday. In some places in the United States like out west they are used to some of this work but most of us do not make all of our meals and kill them in the same spot. It became apparent how much of a lifestyle this type of work is and the true dedication that people go through for themselves, family, land and economy.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:56 PM

 

So few of my students have actual experience working on a farm and being part of the food producing process.  This gallery of 38 photos around the world is a great visual to reinforce how important the harvest is for sustaining life on this planet.  The picture above shows the a Hmong hill tribe woman harvesting a rice terrace field at Mu Cang Chai district, northern Vietnamese province of Yen Bai. The World Bank on Oct. 7 lowered its 2013 growth forecast for East Asian developing countries to 7.1 percent and warned that a prolonged US fiscal crisis could be damaging to the region.

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, landscape, images.

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Vegan food truck makes rounds in 'food deserts'

Vegan food truck makes rounds in 'food deserts' | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Baruch Ben-Yehudah is tackling Prince George’s County’s "food desert" problem. His vegan food truck delivers nourishment to neighborhoods lacking fresh groceries.

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nicole Musset's curator insight, September 14, 2013 1:55 PM

la terre peut offrir de la nourriture à tous ses habitants;mais les interets personnels,la recherche de profits et l'absence de plus en plus grande de conscience "écolologique"....une personne comme Baruch Ben Yehuda est tres importante pour ceux qui souffrent du manque de ressources.

Patricia Stitson's curator insight, September 20, 2013 10:38 PM

After having just driven across country this year I am very in touch with the fact that this model needs to be replicated across the US.

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:03 PM

This food truck is bringing healthy, vegan food, to food deserts. A food desert is a place where healthy food is not accesable to the population, which is always impoverished. These people typically rely on unhealthy/cheap foods that are high in fats, preservatives, and sugars. This leads to tremendous health issues for these populations. Sure, this food truck is making a profit but it is also providing a wonderful service to the community, exposure to healthy foods and an alternative to the norm.

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Exploring farms from above

Exploring farms from above | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Stunning gallery of 15 images depicting agricultural landscapes.  Shown above are cut flower fields in Carlsbad, California circa 1989."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 22, 2013 4:33 PM

"Aerial photographer Alex MacLean estimates he has spent about 6,000 hours in the sky photographing American farms.  His unique perspective depicts the dramatically changing agricultural landscape in the U.S., something he has been drawn to since he started flying nearly 40 years ago.  'I’ve been photographing agricultural lands since I started flying, in the early 1970s,' he says. 'I was drawn to the aesthetics of farmland, in part because of its natural response to environmental conditions, climates, soils and topography…A lot of what I photograph is through discovery of seeing crops, seeing patterns.' 


Tags: agriculture, landscape, images.

Mary Rack's curator insight, May 23, 2013 10:28 AM

These are really beautiful and interesting, but I wish  photos could also reveal what substances are used on the land: fertilizers, pest killers, etc. I will go to his site and see if he addresses that. 

Mary Rack's comment, May 23, 2013 10:35 AM
MacLean's http://www.alexmaclean.com/ is a rich treasure trove of beauty and information! I could lose myself in it for the rest of the day. I recommend it to all thoughtful people.
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Monsanto threatens to sue the entire state of Vermont

Monsanto threatens to sue the entire state of Vermont | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Lawmakers in Vermont are looking to regulate food labels so customers can know which products are made from genetically modified crops, but agricultural giants Monsanto say they will sue if the state follows through.

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Blake Welborn's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:30 AM

If monsanto can win a course a battle saying they don't have to represent their GMO's on products, then they will be able to win in other places which will further murk up the waters of GMO presentation.

Obed Hernandez's curator insight, February 18, 2015 5:34 PM

Figures!

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:58 PM

Questions to ponder: Why is Vermont the first state to make some headway in producing this type of legislation?  Will other states follow suit?  What would the economic impacts be if all places required labels on products that contain genetically modified organisms?  How would that change the agricultural industry?  

 

Tags: GMOs, food, agriculture, agribusiness.  

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Wild rice gene gives yield boost

Wild rice gene gives yield boost | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
A gene from wild Indian rice plants can significantly raise the yield of common varieties in nutrient-poor soils by boosting root growth.

 

While many are leery of GMOs (with good reasons linked to health), it is important to recognize that there is society value to agricultural research that works on improving yields.  This article would be a good "other side of the coin" resource to share when discussing GMOs.   


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How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land?

How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Tags: infographic, food, agriculture, sustainability, urban, urban ecology, locavore, land use, unit 5 agriculture, unit 7 cities.


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Crissy Borton's comment, September 11, 2012 8:36 PM
Looking at purchasing a house in the next year or so and this is one thing we have been looking at. Although we don't want to raise our own meat we would like to grow everything else we eat.
Courtney Holbert's curator insight, February 3, 2013 10:44 PM

Good visual representation of what it would take to be self sufficient.

Chris Scott's curator insight, July 14, 2013 9:51 AM

If you need a backyard that is about 2 acres to live off the land imagine how big of a backyard you would need if you had a family of 8.

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Seeds of A Revolution » 21st Century African Land Rush

Seeds of A Revolution » 21st Century African Land Rush | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Interesting map about farming land lending to other countries in Africa. Impossible to find the original source, but is attricuted to the Financial Times. 

 

Here is a link to the image (in low res) without political content (UN related): http://new.uneca.org/lpi/africanlandrush.aspx ;

 

Tags: Africa, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture.


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The Global Food Waste Scandal

TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

 

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perpective on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 6:13 PM

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:51 AM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2014 2:13 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Hungary Destroys Monsanto GMO Corn Fields

Hungary Destroys Monsanto GMO Corn Fields | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Hungary has taken a stand against biotech giant Monsanto and genetic modification by destroying 1000 acres of maize grown with genetically modified seeds.

 

Peru and Hungary have both banned GMOs. What are the reasons that many are critical of GMOs? What should the government's role be in agriculture and food systems? Are bio-tech companies too strong?


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Courtney Holbert's curator insight, February 3, 2013 10:57 PM

With Monsanto having such a large political power, this is very interesting tat Hungary took a stand. 

Maria Bustamante's comment, February 22, 2013 11:56 AM
This article is about countries that are taking a stand against the company Monsanto. Many people in those countries are critical against the use of GMOs because they're not sure about how the genetic engineering will affect the crops. Already GMOs have had negative effects. The use of GMOs reduces the variety between the seeds. Not only that but the farmers are no longer getting the money the deserve for their hard work and they are not allowed to save their seeds. The government should have little control over the agriculture and what they decide to plant. They should take more precautions against the GMOs and they should make sure that the food system companies in charge of checking the safety food should not have a connection to the very food companies they are supposed to be condemning. Bio-tech companies are getting too strong because they're gaining too much control of the fields due to the patents they hold on their GMOs. This is dangerous because they could end up having a monopoly on the franchise and when they due if something happens to their crops it will happen to all the crops. It will be, for lack of a better word, very bad.
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Food, Nutrition and Geography

Peter Menzel's beautiful photography and our Hungry Planet...

 

This video is a fascinating portal into global food systems and how globalization is impacting local foods.  He traveled around the world to see what families eat in a given week, and how much all the food cost and where it can from.  Many wealthy countries exhibit poor nutritional habits (eating food high in fat, sugar and salt) while some in poorer people have a very balanced diet.  This leads him to describe the 'Nutritional Transition.'  Warning before showing in class: there are brief instances of non-sexualized nudity in the video. 


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