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Finding the True Border Between Yankee and Red Sox Nation Using Facebook Data

Finding the True Border Between Yankee and Red Sox Nation Using Facebook Data | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"By using Facebook data from the 2.5 million people in New York or New England that ‘like’ either the Red Sox or Yankees I was able to create a more accurate rivalry map than ever before."


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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:12 PM

A fun map i can relate to a lot being a New Yorker living in RI. I also believe theres more Yankee fans in Red Sox territory then Red Sox fans in Yankee territory.

trampolinecalf's comment, September 27, 2013 2:55 AM
nice
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:26 AM

Pretty neat use of mapping and facebook to create this. This map is around the idea of what i expected it to look like with a few exceptions. As a yankee fan i expected a little bit more out of fellow Rhode Islanders when it came to the distribution but i guess i was wrong. i would also like to point out that cultural diversity probably has a role to play in this, with western connecticut being more ethnically diverse than eastern.

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The Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy

The Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
After cutting a destructive path through the Caribbean, Hurricane Sandy caused extensive damage along the East Coast this week.

 

While the damage wasn't as bad as many feared it could have been, place and spatial context are especially important in assessing the impacts of a natural disaster.  This is a excellent collection of the many devastating images as a result of Hurricane Sandy.  To see some more local images, Rhode Island Department of Transportation put this collection together.   


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 6, 2012 10:18 PM
I am speechless, these images have just torn my heart. Here in Providence, Rhode Island listened to multiple people say "oh this storm was nothing" they apparently need to view these photos, to understand Sandy was a monster of a storm. Mother nature is powerful and she can do just about anything. I am so mind boggled by the images, roads completely torn apart I never knew this could happen from a hurricane. It really made me appreciate how safe I was but now seeing these images really makes me want to get out there and tell more people to look at what happened in NJ,CT,NYC, and other places around the coast. My next step now is to get a donation bin started to send over to those states in major need. This is sure another natural disaster to go down in history.
Jordan Zemanek's comment, October 3, 2013 11:11 PM
Just with the information given, I can see how much damage the storm actually caused. Flooding and high winds obviously don't go together well. Although some communities weren't hit as bad as previously anticipated, some areas were largely damaged and the money needed to rebuild will be tremendous.
Alaina Rahn's comment, October 4, 2013 10:14 AM
I think it is very sad. I didn't know it was that bad. Now that I see those pictures it makes me feel very bad for those people.
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Not All English is the Same

Not All English is the Same | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other"


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 12:16 AM

I chose this scoop because the title "Not All English is the Same" really stuck out at me. It made me think back to the other article I did on 107 regional slang words. This article was about accents and that everyone pronounces everything differently depending on where you are located in the world. In the main map being shown, they ask the question "What do you call a miniature lobster that one finds in lakes and streams?" A majority of the United States calls it a crawfish, represented by the color red. Another portion calls it a crayfish, represented by the color green. A few people call it a crawdad which is shown in blue and some people just have no word for something that fits this description. It was interesting to see that most of the places that called it a crawfish are located down the Eastern border of the US, with the exception of the scattered states. The people that called it a crayfish are mostly located in the middle of the US and the people who classify it as a crawdad are mostly located in the Northeast.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, January 27, 5:58 PM

This article was actually funny and interesting. You do not really pay attention to the pronunciation of words just because we are surrounded by the same people who say a particular word the same way. Many individuals in the US are in for a culture shock if they leave their respected homes. One word that you have grown up with may be a completely different word in another area. We tend to not focus a lot of attention on the smaller details like this type of grammar and pronunciation so this caught my eye because it was interesting to think about and realize how you say words compared to the rest of the United States.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 28, 11:53 AM

to me this is not so shocking but definitely entertaining. i mean between my family their is pronunciation differences. some say tomato others say toma`to right? not all English is the same is a concept that makes perfect sense to me. in other countries such as Italy, a person from the north cannot understand a person from the south because they speak in different dialects. perhaps it has to their with their location, or job types. but it holds true that different parts of a country can speak the same language in different ways. 

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Sediment Spews from New England River After Irene

Sediment Spews from New England River After Irene | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Nearly a week after Hurricane Irene drenched New England with rainfall in late August 2011, the Connecticut River was spewing muddy sediment into Long Island Sound and wrecking the region's farmland just before harvest.

 

The effects of the flooding in Vermont and New Hampshire graphically manifested on the downstream parts of the watershed.  Good image for showing fluvial deposition and stream load.   


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Nic Hardisty's comment, September 4, 2012 12:04 PM
Fantastic image, One thing that isn't mentioned is the potential effect that this will have an marine navigation. With such a massive movement of sediment, it's hard to imagine that there won't be deposits left throughout the Connecticut River and Long Island Sound. This can have a tremendous impact on boats traversing the waterways, when a foot of sediment can be the difference between safe passage and running aground.