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For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico

For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"With Europe sputtering and China costly, the 'stars are aligning' for Mexico as broad changes in the global economy create new dynamics of migration."


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Aleena Reyes's curator insight, April 8, 2015 9:21 PM

Even though this article is now three years old, it is refreshing to see that Mexico is really making their mark on the global market. The Global North seems to be coming to a stalemate while "up and coming countries" like Mexico are becoming the perfect place for people to begin their businesses and have a fresh start on life. I can understand though, how it was mentioned on the third page of the article, that some locals may feel that foreigners, European especially, may be receiving some type of special treatment due to past colonialism. However, these entrepreneurs are shaping the economy of Mexico. This is Mexico's chance to advance in the world and increase its GDP. Young, aspiring moguls all seems to feel the same way about their homelands, "Europe, dying; Mexico, coming to life. The United States, closed and materialistic; Mexico, open and creative" and Diego Quemada-Diez, a Spanish director, was quoted in the article, "Europe feels spiritually dead and so does the United States...[y]ou end up wanting something else".  And apparently, Mexico has that "something else".

 

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 21, 2015 10:25 AM

Again, I would be interested in seeing how these statistics would change if they were to factor in illegal immigration from Mexico into the United States, but the data remains promising. Mexico has the potential to be an economic powerhouse, and hopefully will utilize this potential sooner rather than later. Although rampant corruption remains in the nation's politics and reinforcement agencies, a strong Mexican economy will ultimately deescalate the violence by stripping the cartels of their strongest allure- well-paying employment for uneducated young men. A stronger Mexican economy will also undoubtedly help the US in terms of trade, as well as reducing the rate of cartel-related violence in the southern regions of the nation. With so many Americans today rallying around Trump's racially-charged rants on Mexican immigration, it brings a smile to my face that we are currently sending more Americans to take Mexican jobs than they are sending our way. The hypocrisy of these politicians and their policies are laughable. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:20 AM

I’ve posted earlier about the end of cheap China; the rising cost of doing business in China coupled with the higher transportation costs to get goods to North American and European markets have made manufacturing in Mexican much more competitive on the global market.  Many investors are turning to Mexico as an emerging land of opportunity and Mexico is now a destination for migrants.  This is still a new pattern:  only 1 percent of the country is foreign-born compared to the 13 percent that you would see in the United States.  Mexican migration to the United States has stabilized; about as many Mexicans have moved to the U.S. (2005-2010) as those that have moved south of the border.


Tags: Mexico, industry, location, place, migration.

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Shifting sands: Changing Geography of the Mexican Drug War

Shifting sands: Changing Geography of the Mexican Drug War | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

FIVE years ago next week, Felipe Calderón took office as Mexico’s president and launched a crackdown against organised crime.

 

While the rates of murders are plateauing at 12,000 per year, internally where are these murders taking place?  Which places are becoming more critical to control?  Murders are shifting east (From Sinaloa and Chihuahua to Nuevo Leon and Veracruz).  Why is this shift occurring?  What does this shift indicate politically and economically for Mexico?


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, September 29, 2013 1:27 PM

These numbers are astonishing especially when based simply on drugs, money, and power.  Compared to the article where it described Tijuana as still being one of the major cities for murder, the numbers and color scheme seem to show the region as one of the areas with less murders.  Heading south into the country, is Mexico City.  The city which is surrounded by such a large metropolitan area with a vast gap between poor and rich tends to have low murder rates.  This is very interesting considering popular belief tends to focus on such violence being conducted in large cities where there is better chance of cartels using the neighborhoods and people within them to strengthen their empire.  This makes me wonder if the authorities are too strong for cartels to infiltrate and become powerful, or on a limb, do the cartels have a mutual agreement not to do business in the country's economical and cultural hub?

Julia & Eva's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:34 PM

This artilce falls under the category of political. It shows that Mexico's continuing drug war has effected the people that live there with lots of violence. By getting a new president, their murder rates have gone down, which has had a significant benefit on their country.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 3, 2014 1:20 PM

In Mexico there is a long standing tradition of the cartels working with officials to make sure their drug operation remain intact. With opportunities at a minimum in these rural areas where drug lords exist, the drug business provides youths with an opportunity they would otherwise not have. In Mexico the informal economy keeps many of these states in business. This shift is only evidence of where police are cracking down and where disputed territories exist. Cartels that have a stronghold over a territory with police cooperation don't need to increase their causality rate to maintain order.

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Border Economies: the Maquiladora Export Landscape

Border Economies: the Maquiladora Export Landscape | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Maquiladoras are a well-known example of developed countries outsourcing factory work that is cited as a factor leading to de-industrialization in the Northeastern USA.  While many geography classes discuss this macro spatial reorganization, this link challenges us to look at the micro spatial systems of maquiladoras that make them economically efficient.  Some good graphs, maps and images.  


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Derek Ethier's comment, September 20, 2012 10:15 PM
Developed countries outsourcing jobs has become largely beneficial for developing countries. In the case of Mexico, the residents are given new opportunities in manufacturing jobs that they may have never had before. The industrialization of the border area can only lead to increasing development and hopefully a better standard of living for citizens. Unfortunately, it has the exact opposite effect on the U.S., which is giving away jobs.
Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 26, 2012 11:14 AM
This article is displaying the postive and negative side effects that these Maquiladoras have upon the development of stronger economic economies for such countries as Mexico. These buisnesss that invest in the border of Mexico allow these towns/cities to grow and become industrilized. This provides low skill work for the people of Mexico but the logistics of the companies are still being done in the country that has invested in these places. This is good because it lets countries like the United States keep educated/high paying jobs in the States. The negative aspect is that the only jobs the Mexicans recieve are the low paying uneducated type. However still it has postives for both countries and its something we must get used to because its the way of the future.
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Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans

Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus over the past few years, according to local officials, border experts and demographers.

 

The migration from Mexico to the USA has slowed tremendously in the 21st century, but due to the drug violence, the demographic profile of the migrants has changed significantly. 


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Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 1:22 PM

Despite Mexico making improvements to make Mexicans want to stay below the border. The drug trafficking violence does make people want to leave. Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans, wealthy businessmen and average Mexicans are fleeing Mexico and have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus, and they're being warmly welcomed, unlike the much larger population of illegal immigrants. Mexicans are fleeing cartel wars that have left more than 37,000 Mexicans dead in just 4 years, 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 2:12 PM

This article is interesting because we were used to seeing poorer immigrants from Mexico looking for work and a new way of life.  However, the more affluent communities are migrating North to the U.S. and legally because of the turmoil of the drug wars in their country.  It is disappointing to see that drugs, violence and murder are pushing away people from their own country

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 3, 2014 1:23 PM

For more affluent Mexicans the ability to migrate north is much easier than for the poor. They have the money and the skills to move into the United States. Also with the open lines of communication and ease of flux with business over the border make moving to the U.S. an excellent way to avoid being caught in the cross fire among drug cartels. For the poor however they are either forced to find work with the cartel or risk being an innocent bystander. It also makes you think about the terminology we use to describe Mexican immigrants, are they not refugees of this drug war?

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Christmas in Mexico

Christmas in Mexico | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are some very special traditions surrounding Christmas celebrations in Mexico.

 

Yo quiero encontrar un lugar en New England con buñuelos!


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 15, 2014 11:18 PM

Merry Christmas! Feliz Navidad as they say in Mexico. There are many different unique ways that Christmas is celebrated here. Some of their Christmas traditions originated in Spain and other's developed in Mexico. Christmas celebrations usually take place throughout the whole month of December. Holiday foods are of course a big part of the celebration. Dishes include ensalada de Noche Buena and ponche Navideno. Mexico has other famous traditions as well. There is one tradition that takes place every year from December 16th up until Christmas, where processions reenact Mary and Joseph's search for Bethlehem. Also, like the US, nativity scenes are present throughout the holiday season. Another thing done in Mexico that is similar to the US is the idea of Christmas carolers. However, in Mexico, they call them Villancicos. Although some traditions remain the same, there are some different, more unique ones that we here in the US do not include in our Christmas celebrations.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 10:12 PM

I love reading about holidays like Christmas and how the traditions surrounding it varies, or are similar to our own. For instance i notice that the Christmas tree is a symbol of Christmas the seems to be very global however the food served for the holiday is drastically different between different cultures. Definitely would make a cool research project.

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Immigration to U.S. From Mexico in Decline Amid Tough Economy

Immigration to U.S. From Mexico in Decline Amid Tough Economy | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The number of Mexicans leaving for the United States is just about cancelled out by the number returning, according to statistics provided by the Mexican government.

 

Besides being an important (underreported) political fact, this new migratory pattern can lead to a good discussion of push and pull factors that lead to the geography of migration. 


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Max Minard's curator insight, March 23, 2015 8:57 PM

Back in 2012, the number of Mexican immigrants coming to America had declined due to several push factors, mainly involving the rough economy "north of the border". Despite the fact that many Mexican immigrants are still migrating to America, many have decided against this decision based off factors such as the risk of the making the trek and the more evident reason being that America's economy is going through a rough time. They don't want to show up in America unable to find employment which is the reason they had left their previous country. I personally think this is an accurate outlook considering 2012 experienced many rough patches in the economy which can further result in the decrease in incoming immigrants. Overall, this tough and amid economy in America along with the long, risky trek can both be classified as push factors, pushing away Mexican immigrants from wanting to settle in The United States.

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Interactive maps Mexico-USA migration channels

Interactive maps  Mexico-USA migration channels | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
In several previous posts we have looked at specific migration channels connecting Mexico to the USA: From Morelos to Minnesota; case study of a migrant...

 

An excellent way to show examples of chain migration and the gravity model...students will understand the concepts with concretes examples. These interactive maps have crisp geo-visualizations of the migratory flows.


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 3, 2015 4:09 PM

When it comes to ethnic groups in the United States, many of the hispanic/mexican ancestors occur in the southwestern area of the United States. That's obviously because Mexico is southwest of the United States. When it comes to emigrating from Mexico, individuals immigrate to the United States (mostly southwest of the United States) so they can live a different, hopefully better economy. Plus, they try to escape the gang violence and drug violence in Mexico.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 2015 1:05 PM

This is a good representation of chain migration.

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, April 3, 2015 1:46 PM

Migration

This map show the most popular migratory flows of migration from Mexico to the US. 

This ties into our unit about migration because many Mexicans migrate to the US every year. This map shows the patterns and paths of the migration.