AP Human Geography Education
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Geography of Europe Games

Geography of Europe Games | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 18, 2015 5:49 PM

An absolutely great and fun way to learn and explore different geographic locations.  Anytime learning can be made fun or turned into a game is always a win-win.  I found myself screwing around with these mini games and before I knew it, 45 minutes had passed, and I was not as good at Geography as I thought I was.  I will be back to play/learn more!

Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 18, 2015 6:59 PM

This is an interesting way to learn geography in a more interactive way. This link provides many different games that allow you to not only play a game but learn while you do it! These games can test capitals, rivers, monarchies, countries, regions, peninsulas, battles, etc. All of these relate to Europe and can provide different learning techniques for anyone who is interested in them.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:05 PM

This Toporopa is a great interaction games for people who are interested in geography. Europe has a rich history dates back to colonial times and there are many interesting facts that a lot of people does not know about it. It is fun and entertaining way to train your brain and a great review to see what you know about the world.

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Mapping Europe's war on immigration

Mapping Europe's war on immigration | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Europe has built a fortress around itself to protect itself from ‘illegal' immigration from the South, from peoples fleeing civil war, conflict and devastating poverty. The story is best understood through maps.

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Marist Geography's curator insight, October 17, 2013 8:05 AM

This shows how Europe controlles entry into its borders. With MEDC's being favoured over LEDC's

François Arnal's comment, October 21, 2013 11:32 AM
https://www.facebook.com/events/462634527184992/
François Arnal's comment, October 21, 2013 11:33 AM
A "Café géographique" with Philippe Rekacewicz" in ST Dié des Vosges for the International Festival of Geography. https://www.facebook.com/events/462634527184992/
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How To Say 'Beer' Everywhere In Europe

How To Say 'Beer' Everywhere In Europe | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:46 AM

Well pivo sounds funny, and Cervesa sound classy. I wonder how you say "Cwrw". Maybe: " See-warwar". It's funny.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 7:13 PM

This map tells us all the different ways that people say the word "beer" in Europe. All the light brown regions call it beer or bier. The dark brown calls it ale and the yellow regions call it pivo. Black regions have other untitled names for beer and the oranges regions refer to beer as cerveza. According to the map, a majority of Europe uses the words pivo and beer/bier. Only a few countries use the world cervaza, which is interesting to me because this word was relatively familiar to me.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:32 PM

When it comes to languages, it's obvious that most of the English language from the United States spreads overseas to Europe. However, the accents of simple English comes from living in Europe so they put a little spin on the english language. Also, there are some languages that can have similar word pronunciations as English such as the french language and the german language. As you can see, most of those languages are on the western side of Europe but there is a big chunk of Spain that speaks the spanish language. Since Spain is as big as it is and it is furthest to the west than any other European country, that makes the United States have the spanish language as their most popular foreign language.

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Tiny Capital

Created by Eirik Evjen.  The production of this video was made out of 76,940 single photos.

 

"Norway has recently reached 5 million inhabitants and the capital is growing rapidly. The city scene in Oslo is steadily thickening with taller buildings, more people and the never-ending construction sites. Being by far the most populated city in Norway with 613 000 inhabitants, most Norwegians look to Oslo as a major capital. However, if one compares Oslo to other international capitals, Oslo only ranks as the 112th largest. Oslo is indeed a major capital, just a small one…"

 

Tags: art, urban, Europe, landscape, unit 7 cities.


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:39 PM

Oslo may be small in size, but it is quickly growing and advancing. Norway's capital is now a place of constant travel and exploration. The 76,940 photos used to create this video embrace Oslo's city rush and functionality. 

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iTunes: Geography Videos

iTunes: Geography Videos | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Two videos from a TV producer who is now in the geography classroom are available for free in the iTunes store.  The 1st video shows a lot of great examples of material culture items found during archeological digs called "The Ancient Agora." 

 

The 4th is a 30 minute film on the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal, which shows many sacred sites, burial/cremation practices, and other aspects of Nepali culture.  For more work by this fellow geography teacher see: http://www.agiftforthevillage.blogspot.com/


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Interactive Sistine Chapel

Interactive Sistine Chapel | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

One of the amazing memories of my trip to Europe was visiting the Vatican and developing a kink in my neck from marveling at the ceiling in the Sistine Chapel.  No photography is allowed to preserve reverence in what many consider not only a cultural heritage site, but a holy site.  This link is the next best thing to being in the Vatican staring at the Sistine Chapel.  We might not be able to travel the world with our students, but this can help us bring the world to our classroom.


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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 10:50 AM

This is a very cool opportunity due to the fact that photography isn't usually allowed in the Sistine chapel. Of course it can't compare to the beauty of the place in person, but in some ways it's almost more powerful as this room is usually filled to the brim with tourists, seeing it empty is a bit more striking as you can appreciate the fool instead of missing it in the crowds of people.

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Language on Twitter

Language on Twitter | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
API Cartographer Eric Fischer plots language shapefiles of Twitter.

 

Some other images show how social media cuts across place, time and culture and communications have 'defeated' geography to unite the world.  This image (besides looking pretty) shows that culture and place still matter within our increasingly interconnected globalized communications.  There are some very real creating obstacles to diffusion and even if the technology exists for "one huge conversation," there are non-intersecting conversations because of cultural and community differences. 


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Emily Bian's curator insight, October 3, 2014 5:13 PM

This is a thematic map showing the different languages spoken on Twitter in Europe. This Europe thematic is really neat to look at, but it also shows globalization in that Twitter is everywhere, and people are more connected because of it. This increases interactions between people living in different countries, and even different continents. 

            3) language and communication

This will help future APHUG students, because Twitter is relatable to a lot of teens and it will open their eyes to the different languages spoken across Europe and the world, and it's not just English. It connects them to the rest of the world. 

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NYTimes video: Sweden's Immigrant Identity

NYTimes video: Sweden's Immigrant Identity | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
One out of four Swedes are immigrants or have a parent with an immigrant background.

 

Demographic shifts leading to political and cultural tensions.   Europe, which historically has been a source of migrants, is relatively new to be a destination for migrants and that has heightened some of the conflicts. 


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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 6:29 PM

This video is shows the changing demographics of Sweden. Sweden and several other wealthier countries of Europe are now destinations for immigrants where they were once the origin of them. The change is difficult for these nations as they are somewhat unprepared economically and politically for significant immigration.

 

The immigrants end up feeling unwanted in their new country and their old. This feeling of being unwanted is possibly worse than it would be in the United States, a country more accustomed to immigration.

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, March 29, 2014 8:07 PM

This growingly intense immigration situation parallels that of our own here in the U.S. and in many other countries throughout the world. World citizens, refugees, don't feel at home in their birth country nor do they feel welcomed in their current home or host country. This puts a lot of stress and pressure on these already punished populations. That's not to say that the host countries concerned citizens don't have a reason to be worried, but are their responses appropriate or productive?  

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:29 AM

Europe is a place that makes traveling to different countries relatively easy. This makes sense that their would be migration that is inter-european. 

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Europe moves to end passport-free travel in migrant row

Europe moves to end passport-free travel in migrant row | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
European interior ministers agree to 'radical revision' of Schengen amid fears of a flood of migrants from north Africa...

 

The Schengen Treaty is one of the most important aspects that facilitate the free flow of People goods and capital in Europe.  With increasing cultural anxiety connected to immigration during economic rough times, will this signal a reversal of Europe's trend towards increasing regional integration? 


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 9:32 PM

European nations moved to reverse decades of unfettered travel across the continent when a majority of EU governments agreed the need to reinstate national passport controls amid fears of a flood of immigrants fleeing the upheaval in North Africa. In a serious blow to one of the cornerstones of a united, integrated Europe, EU interior ministers embarked on a radical revision of the passport-free travel regime known as the Schengen system to allow the 26 participating governments to restore border controls. They also agreed to combat immigration by pressing for "readmission accords" with countries in the Middle East and north Africa to send refugees back to where they came from. The policy shift was pushed by France and Italy, who have been feuding and panicking in recent weeks over a small influx of refugees from Tunisia. But 15 of the 22 EU states which had signed up to Schengen supported the move, with only four resisting, according to officials and diplomats present.

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How China can help Europe get out of debt

How China can help Europe get out of debt | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
How it can halt the European debt crisis.

 

The economic struggles of one country, in the era of globalization and supranational organizations such as the E.U., have an increasingly wider area of impact with larger ripples in the pond.


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Gates of Vienna--Anti-Muslim immigration sentiment in Europe

Gates of Vienna--Anti-Muslim immigration sentiment in Europe | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This website is one I've always referenced to highlight the growing trend of right-wing/anti-immigration parties in Europe (I DO NOT CONDONE THE IDEAS OF THE BLOG OBVIOUSLY).  After the terrorist attack in Norway, it was discovered that this particular blogger was enormously influential on the thinking of the terrorist.  Why Gates of Vienna?  In his words, "At the siege of Vienna in 1683 Islam seemed poised to overrun Christian Europe. We are in a new phase of a very old war." 

 

The Demographic Transition, Migration and politics all merge in this geographic restructuring of Europe.


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Scandinavian Energy Usage

Scandinavian Energy Usage | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Which countries consume the most electricity per person? You might guess the United States would top the World Bank’s list, but the Nordic countries of Iceland, Norway, Finland, and Sweden are actually at or near the top. Icelanders consume an average of 52,374 kilowatt hours per person per year, Norwegians 23,174 kilowatt hours, Finns 15,738 kilowatt hours, and Swedes 14,030 kilowatt hours. Americans are not far behind, with an average consumption of 13,246 kilowatt hours per person. The Japanese consume 7,848 kilowatt hours.

 

This image is part of a global composite assembled from data acquired by the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite in 2012. The nighttime view of Earth was made possible by the “day-night band” of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite. VIIRS detects light in a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared and uses filtering techniques to observe dim signals such as city lights, wildfires, and gas flares. The city lights of several major Nordic cities are visible in the imagery, including Stockholm, Sweden (population 905,184); Oslo, Norway (634,463); Helsinki, Finland (614,074), and Reykjavik, Iceland (121,490).

 

Tags: Europe, energy, remote sensing, development, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Norway.


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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 18, 2015 5:59 PM

It is not surprising to me that these countries, or any country that resides in a high latitude area, have high usage of electricity.  The combination of extreme cold temperatures and times of meager amounts of daylight equal high uses of energy.  High populations of these areas tend to be around the coast as well, so these areas have to work extra hard to keep people warm, fed, etc.  If people were more spread out, the usage might not be as high. 

Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 18, 2015 7:17 PM

This articles discusses which countries use the most electricity and believe it or not, the Nordic countries are at the top of the list. It shows two satellite images in the nighttime for you to get a better visual as to which areas of these countries use the most electricity. There are multiple factors that go into these countries consuming this much energy. One factor that is interesting is the high demand for electricity because of the long winters in these countries. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 9:34 AM

These images are really interesting and expose just how much electricity the Scandinavian countries actually use. It is surprising to think of these nations as large energy consumers because of their general reputation as progressive, clean, and liberal places. This brief article is an excellent example of how maps and satellite images can be misleading, though. As opposed to places like the U.S. or China, energy consumption in the Scandinavian countries actually produces only small amounts of greenhouse gases and is based on renewable energy sources. 

 

This shows an interesting and not immediately apparent geographic distinction between the Scandinavian countries and places such as China and the U.S. Chinese and United States energy consumption is enormous because of those countries' ability and desire to produce large amounts of goods quickly. Household energy use is also high because of the widespread use of electronics such as televisions, computers, and appliances. The Scandinavian countries, on the other hand, have a need for increased energy use because of their geographic location: long, dark winters mean an increased need for electricity and for longer periods. Also, Scandinavia is able to produce energy at lower costs due to its use of renewable energy sources. So though those countries may consume much more energy than their non-Scandinavian counterparts, they are doing so responsibly and for a reason. 

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Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries

Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Europe and Asia, while often considered two separate continents, both lie on the same landmass or tectonic plate, the Eurasian supercontinent. The historic and geographic story of the Eurasian boundary is intriguing."


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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:26 PM

If Europe and Asia are not different continents based on the tectonic plates that they both share, would that mean that Russia is in a fact a part of Europe. Wouldn't its ties be closely link to that of Asia, because growing up in school, I was taught that Russia was closely related to the Asian continent than it was to Europe. Though Russia is sometimes perceived as being its own continent, I wonder what this discovery will mean for them long term.

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 20, 2015 1:32 PM

The article states that the idea of separate continents comes from European scholars whom wanted to give more definition to there culture and area of the world, essentially there region. I wonder if this could be said in regards to the inhabitant East of the Ural Mountains. Did they want a form of boundary to represent and distinguish there region? None the less, we live in the west so the western perspective is what guides us. 

Even if there never was a Europe and an Asia, there would still be land disputes as to whom has claim to which region/area of land. On a global perspective its viewed as Europe and Asia but when one takes a closer look its simply country and country... not continent and continent. This article is revealing the importance of Eurasia, how it truly does exist. A quasi boundary is not going to separate the once "two continents" rather nothing separates the continents, its all part of Eurasia. 

A neat part of the article is how the writer states recognizing the land mass as two continents is old and out of date. Its basically wrong and non-intelligent. I believe this is important and is something that needs to be recognized on a national scale (here in the United States). Personally I've always recognized the realm as "Eurasia." I now feel more intelligent for doing so! How do people in Europe and with this being said Asia, feel about this more reformed definition of the supercontinent? Do they even recognize it as true? Perhaps they realize there are more important issues at hand like current  countries  disputed and invaded borders.

None the less there is disputed boundaries on a more micro level, when compared to the continent versus continent scheme. For example Russian backed separatists have claimed a portion of Eastern Ukraine. Do people actually see this as Asians expanding into Europe or rather a transcontinental country (Russia) expanding itself more westward. The importance here lies in the disputed country boundaries, not continental boundaries, yet one cannot not deny the significance of the  "continental boundary" which some people do believe in. But the core of the matter is the country to country ratio. 

 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2015 2:25 PM

This was interesting to read because I don't associate the two till I can visually see it.  Then to further call it Eurasia makes sense as well.  There is a population that are considered Asian Russians.  I did a study on this culture and I couldn't believe there were Asian Russians. This sounds crazy.  It would make sense for cross cultures in this region.  

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England, Britain and the UK

England, Britain and the UK | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is the short version of the differences between these interrelated places and terms; the long version is much more complicated than this. 

 

Tags: Europe, political, unit 4 political, states, toponyms.


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James Hobson's curator insight, October 9, 2014 11:05 PM

(Europe topic 7)

Perhaps this "short" version would've been a better starting point for those less familiar with the terminology. :-) And at least this doesn;t have to be edited to include an independent Scotland, which might've sparked a debate about the terms "U.K." and "Great Britain."

Nonetheless, this serves as a great example of the often-overlooked contrast between physical and political boundaries. Perhaps a simpler example would be "the Americas" (physical) and "the United States of America" (political).

Perhaps one peculiarity which I can relate to this example is that of "Bristol County", a term used seemingly interchangeably between all towns in east-central Rhode Island and nearby Massachusetts. Though currently these are 2 separate counties in 2 different states which just happen to bear the same name, realizing the history behind all of these types of examples can offer further insight into the geographic contexts (physical, political, personal, etc.)

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 1:52 PM

Its no wonder people often get confused when referencing the UK, Britain Isles and Great Britain. I sometimes struggle with the terms and being able to locate where each of the 5 countries fall under. This diagram does a good job at pinpointing where each of the 5 countries on the eastern border of Europe lies.Great Britain consist of Scotland, England, and Wales. The United Kingdom consist of Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland, While Ireland consist of the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. And finally the British Isles consisting of all the countries within. This raises the question, if Northern Ireland is a part of the United Kingdom, is their identity shared also with the Republic of Ireland?

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 3:20 PM

To be honest here, this map clarifies a lot of things for myself. I never understood what the British Isles were compares to the UK, Great Britain and England. People used to confuse me all the time and they would refer to England as the UK or Great Britain. Now, I understand England is it's own country and it is part of the UK which is a combination of countries, where as Great Britain is just Three areas, which also include England in it. Now, I fully understand the concept of the United Kingdom and Great Britain. . 

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Ghosts of War

Ghosts of War | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The remarkable pictures show scenes from France today with atmospheric photographs taken in the same place during the war superimposed on top.

 

In this fastinating set of images, Dutch artist and historian Jo Teeuwisse merges her passions literally by superimposing World War II photographs on to modern pictures of the where the photos were originally taken.  This serves as a reminder that places are rich with history; to understand the geography of a place, one must also know it's history (and vice versa).   

 

Tags: Europe, war, images, historial, place. 


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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:26 AM

I'm not even sure what to say about this set of pictures exactly, except that they're a very cool way to see history. I'm interesting in Social Studies and history because I'm captivated by seeing the world framed in a story, and these images do just that. To see the same places where the war was fought and what has changed is great, but these photos also give the impression of some stories of war. The idea of them being "ghosts" gives the impression of something left behind which marks the land even to this day.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:56 PM

Very interesting, I've seen similar things done with Russian cities and parts of the Ukaranian country side.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:47 PM

This Dutch historian does a great job at interweaving places that were ridden by the second world war to its modern reconstruct. As a child, I use to question a lot what a place looked like prior to it being destroyed. In the context of Europe a continent, ridden by war, the historian not only does a great job at depicting past and present, her photographs also show how the country's government went to great lengths to preserve some of its land's historic sites.

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Interactive panoramic view of Paris

Interactive panoramic view of Paris | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

From the Eiffel Tower, you can pan and zoom to see the whole city.  This could be a fantastic 'hook' for an urban geography class.  Paris has been the model for so many urban restructuring projects, that this would work nicely as grist for discuss centering on ideas of urbanism (and it's just stunningly gorgeous).  Enjoy playing with this as it is very easy to manipulate and control.   


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elsa hunziker's comment, January 30, 2012 2:19 PM
Feels like you're there! Love this!
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Cyprus, political divisions and protests

Cypriots join the global protest movement to heal their divisions...

 

Cyprus has a long history of violence between Greek and Turkish Cypriots, so the buffer zone protest which follows the #occupy model, has greater political, ethnic, historical and geographic implications.  Will this grassroots effort open a political dialogue to resolve the island’s divisions?  Here is the group's Facebook page.  The video is long, but the first few minutes are especially relevant with a nice overview. 


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Europe's four big dilemmas

Europe's four big dilemmas | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The BBC looks at four big questions that need to be answered if the eurozone crisis is to be laid to rest.

The crisis of our times...


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Video: "Way Back Home"

Way Back Home is the incredible new riding clip from Danny MacAskill, it follows him on a journey from Edinburgh back to his hometown Dunvegan, in the Isle o...

 

This extreme sports clip is infused with gorgeous physical landscapes and marvelously quaint, iconic cultural landscapes.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 2014 9:11 AM

This extreme sports clip is infused with gorgeous physical landscapes and marvelously quaint, iconic cultural landscapes (and I love the music).  This is one of my favorite videos, and in my based-paced geography videos collection.  


Tag: Scotland, sport, landscape.

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Satellite Image, Landscape Analysis: Venice

Satellite Image, Landscape Analysis: Venice | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Credits: European Space Imaging (EUSI)...

 

One of the great landscapes showing the human-environmental interaction so vividly. This image always reminds me of Deryck Holdsworth's lectures at Penn State about Venice and the urban historical geographies of trade, commerce and commodities.  This image exemplifies some of the key advantages in the earliest iterations of the globalizing forces that created the modern global economy.   


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 12, 2013 3:50 PM

One of the great landscapes showing the human-environmental interaction so vividly. This image always reminds me of Deryck Holdsworth's lectures at Penn State about Venice and the urban historical geographies of trade, commerce and commodities.  This image exemplifies some of the key advantages in the earliest iterations of the globalizing forces that created the modern global economy.  

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 12, 2013 3:51 PM

One of the great landscapes showing the human-environmental interaction so vividly. This image always reminds me of Deryck Holdsworth's lectures at Penn State about Venice and the urban historical geographies of trade, commerce and commodities.  This image exemplifies some of the key advantages in the earliest iterations of the globalizing forces that created the modern global economy.  

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No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe

No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Birthrates across the Continent are falling at drastic and, to many, alarming rates. Why are Europeans so hesitant to have children, and what does it mean for their future and for ours?

 

Nice piece that show work well for understanding the demographic transition, which links population growth rates with levels of human development.


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:11 PM

Unit 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:06 AM

11 billion people projection for the future but a decline in population in Europe? How? What factors altered this? Why? 

Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:36 PM

This article discusses the population decrease in Southern Italy. The small city called Laviano is now deserted because of the extremely low birth rate. Rocco Falivena, the major, says that he proposed a system to get women to produce more babies. Pregnant women will receive 10,000 euros over the years if they produce a baby. Even with this system the population remains to be decreasing. 


The dramatic decrease of this small city will have huge economic consequences. This city is an example of the opposite that is happening globally and proves that the world needs a stable population and not a population decline.