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Mapping Europe's war on immigration

Mapping Europe's war on immigration | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Europe has built a fortress around itself to protect itself from ‘illegal' immigration from the South, from peoples fleeing civil war, conflict and devastating poverty. The story is best understood through maps.

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Marist Geography's curator insight, October 17, 2013 5:05 AM

This shows how Europe controlles entry into its borders. With MEDC's being favoured over LEDC's

François Arnal's comment, October 21, 2013 8:32 AM
https://www.facebook.com/events/462634527184992/
François Arnal's comment, October 21, 2013 8:33 AM
A "Café géographique" with Philippe Rekacewicz" in ST Dié des Vosges for the International Festival of Geography. https://www.facebook.com/events/462634527184992/
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How To Say 'Beer' Everywhere In Europe

How To Say 'Beer' Everywhere In Europe | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

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Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 7:34 AM

I really find it interesting how such a popular beverage is said from place to place in one area. Depending on where you live in one country or continent can change how something is said. Me living in the Eastern part of the United states we could Beer, beer. Compared to Europe calling "Beer" ale, pivo, cervesa, etc. Its facinating how depending on one's culture such a popular thing can be changed.

 

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Tiny Capital

Created by Eirik Evjen.  The production of this video was made out of 76,940 single photos.

 

"Norway has recently reached 5 million inhabitants and the capital is growing rapidly. The city scene in Oslo is steadily thickening with taller buildings, more people and the never-ending construction sites. Being by far the most populated city in Norway with 613 000 inhabitants, most Norwegians look to Oslo as a major capital. However, if one compares Oslo to other international capitals, Oslo only ranks as the 112th largest. Oslo is indeed a major capital, just a small one…"

 

Tags: art, urban, Europe, landscape, unit 7 cities.


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2:39 PM

Oslo may be small in size, but it is quickly growing and advancing. Norway's capital is now a place of constant travel and exploration. The 76,940 photos used to create this video embrace Oslo's city rush and functionality. 

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iTunes: Geography Videos

iTunes: Geography Videos | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Two videos from a TV producer who is now in the geography classroom are available for free in the iTunes store.  The 1st video shows a lot of great examples of material culture items found during archeological digs called "The Ancient Agora." 

 

The 4th is a 30 minute film on the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal, which shows many sacred sites, burial/cremation practices, and other aspects of Nepali culture.  For more work by this fellow geography teacher see: http://www.agiftforthevillage.blogspot.com/


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Interactive Sistine Chapel

Interactive Sistine Chapel | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

One of the amazing memories of my trip to Europe was visiting the Vatican and developing a kink in my neck from marveling at the ceiling in the Sistine Chapel.  No photography is allowed to preserve reverence in what many consider not only a cultural heritage site, but a holy site.  This link is the next best thing to being in the Vatican staring at the Sistine Chapel.  We might not be able to travel the world with our students, but this can help us bring the world to our classroom.


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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 7:50 AM

This is a very cool opportunity due to the fact that photography isn't usually allowed in the Sistine chapel. Of course it can't compare to the beauty of the place in person, but in some ways it's almost more powerful as this room is usually filled to the brim with tourists, seeing it empty is a bit more striking as you can appreciate the fool instead of missing it in the crowds of people.

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Language on Twitter

Language on Twitter | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
API Cartographer Eric Fischer plots language shapefiles of Twitter.

 

Some other images show how social media cuts across place, time and culture and communications have 'defeated' geography to unite the world.  This image (besides looking pretty) shows that culture and place still matter within our increasingly interconnected globalized communications.  There are some very real creating obstacles to diffusion and even if the technology exists for "one huge conversation," there are non-intersecting conversations because of cultural and community differences. 


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NYTimes video: Sweden's Immigrant Identity

NYTimes video: Sweden's Immigrant Identity | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
One out of four Swedes are immigrants or have a parent with an immigrant background.

 

Demographic shifts leading to political and cultural tensions.   Europe, which historically has been a source of migrants, is relatively new to be a destination for migrants and that has heightened some of the conflicts. 


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:08 PM

Sweden is currently one of the most prosperous countries in the world.  Being so close and accessible to many neighboring European countries makes it that much more appealing and even easier for people to travel there.  The birth rates have slowed in recent years, meaning people of working age are slowly decreasing; less workers and less jobs can lower the economy.  After the conflicts in Syria, Sweden has even volunteered to house refugees to start new and in turn can help put the demographic shift on the upswing.  With such an inviting atmosphere in the Scandinavian region, it's no wonder why there are so many citizens with immigrant backgrounds.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 3:29 PM

This video is shows the changing demographics of Sweden. Sweden and several other wealthier countries of Europe are now destinations for immigrants where they were once the origin of them. The change is difficult for these nations as they are somewhat unprepared economically and politically for significant immigration.

 

The immigrants end up feeling unwanted in their new country and their old. This feeling of being unwanted is possibly worse than it would be in the United States, a country more accustomed to immigration.

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, March 29, 5:07 PM

This growingly intense immigration situation parallels that of our own here in the U.S. and in many other countries throughout the world. World citizens, refugees, don't feel at home in their birth country nor do they feel welcomed in their current home or host country. This puts a lot of stress and pressure on these already punished populations. That's not to say that the host countries concerned citizens don't have a reason to be worried, but are their responses appropriate or productive?  

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Europe moves to end passport-free travel in migrant row

Europe moves to end passport-free travel in migrant row | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
European interior ministers agree to 'radical revision' of Schengen amid fears of a flood of migrants from north Africa...

 

The Schengen Treaty is one of the most important aspects that facilitate the free flow of People goods and capital in Europe.  With increasing cultural anxiety connected to immigration during economic rough times, will this signal a reversal of Europe's trend towards increasing regional integration? 


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How China can help Europe get out of debt

How China can help Europe get out of debt | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
How it can halt the European debt crisis.

 

The economic struggles of one country, in the era of globalization and supranational organizations such as the E.U., have an increasingly wider area of impact with larger ripples in the pond.


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Gates of Vienna--Anti-Muslim immigration sentiment in Europe

Gates of Vienna--Anti-Muslim immigration sentiment in Europe | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This website is one I've always referenced to highlight the growing trend of right-wing/anti-immigration parties in Europe (I DO NOT CONDONE THE IDEAS OF THE BLOG OBVIOUSLY).  After the terrorist attack in Norway, it was discovered that this particular blogger was enormously influential on the thinking of the terrorist.  Why Gates of Vienna?  In his words, "At the siege of Vienna in 1683 Islam seemed poised to overrun Christian Europe. We are in a new phase of a very old war." 

 

The Demographic Transition, Migration and politics all merge in this geographic restructuring of Europe.


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Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries

Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Europe and Asia, while often considered two separate continents, both lie on the same landmass or tectonic plate, the Eurasian supercontinent. The historic and geographic story of the Eurasian boundary is intriguing."


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shawn Giblin's curator insight, July 15, 2013 6:42 AM

very interesting to think that Turkey is a transcontinental country, as well to find out that asia and europe are actually connected.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:14 AM

Here we can see that the continental boundary between Russia and the rest of Europe has historically been solely based on national borders. However, a large majority of Russia's population and major cities are in the western part of the country, which is closer to Europe than most Asian countries.  Because of this, Europe and Asia gained an imaginary cultural border. It only makes sense that part of Russia began to be considered a European region even though it physically is a part of Asia.  It is better to talk about the entire land mass of Eurasia rather than two split continents when talking about Russia's borders.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 8:06 AM

I find this discussion very interesting.  How we define the boarders of the continents may not seem important but they do hold much in the way of historical and cultural meanings.  Is Europe separate from Asia or is it one super-continent?  The answer to that has many implications politically and culturally as well as historically.

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England, Britain and the UK

England, Britain and the UK | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is the short version of the differences between these interrelated places and terms; the long version is much more complicated than this. 

 

Tags: Europe, political, unit 4 political, states, toponyms.


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Ally Clark/Mayse Thao's curator insight, February 7, 8:09 AM

This is kinda like the video we watched where that guy who talks fast explained the uk. Oh and this is political

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Ghosts of War

Ghosts of War | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The remarkable pictures show scenes from France today with atmospheric photographs taken in the same place during the war superimposed on top.

 

In this fastinating set of images, Dutch artist and historian Jo Teeuwisse merges her passions literally by superimposing World War II photographs on to modern pictures of the where the photos were originally taken.  This serves as a reminder that places are rich with history; to understand the geography of a place, one must also know it's history (and vice versa).   

 

Tags: Europe, war, images, historial, place. 


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 30, 2013 12:02 PM

Incredible to see this kind of work.  I really hope this helps people remember what happened and what was given up in World War II.  As we lost more vets every day, we really need to make sure their scarifice is not forgotten.  Incredible piece of work here.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 25, 9:56 AM

Historian Jo Teeuwisse creates dramatic imagery by overlaying negative images onto current images. These World War II photos show how different things were at the time and how people walk these streets everyday and may not even think twice about the streets history. Art is the best way to show emotion, and Jo Teeuwisse's art imposes a creative take on this.

Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 8:26 AM

I'm not even sure what to say about this set of pictures exactly, except that they're a very cool way to see history. I'm interesting in Social Studies and history because I'm captivated by seeing the world framed in a story, and these images do just that. To see the same places where the war was fought and what has changed is great, but these photos also give the impression of some stories of war. The idea of them being "ghosts" gives the impression of something left behind which marks the land even to this day.

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Interactive panoramic view of Paris

Interactive panoramic view of Paris | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

From the Eiffel Tower, you can pan and zoom to see the whole city.  This could be a fantastic 'hook' for an urban geography class.  Paris has been the model for so many urban restructuring projects, that this would work nicely as grist for discuss centering on ideas of urbanism (and it's just stunningly gorgeous).  Enjoy playing with this as it is very easy to manipulate and control.   


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elsa hunziker's comment, January 30, 2012 11:19 AM
Feels like you're there! Love this!
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Cyprus, political divisions and protests

Cypriots join the global protest movement to heal their divisions...

 

Cyprus has a long history of violence between Greek and Turkish Cypriots, so the buffer zone protest which follows the #occupy model, has greater political, ethnic, historical and geographic implications.  Will this grassroots effort open a political dialogue to resolve the island’s divisions?  Here is the group's Facebook page.  The video is long, but the first few minutes are especially relevant with a nice overview. 


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Europe's four big dilemmas

Europe's four big dilemmas | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The BBC looks at four big questions that need to be answered if the eurozone crisis is to be laid to rest.

The crisis of our times...


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Video: "Way Back Home"

Way Back Home is the incredible new riding clip from Danny MacAskill, it follows him on a journey from Edinburgh back to his hometown Dunvegan, in the Isle o...

 

This extreme sports clip is infused with gorgeous physical landscapes and marvelously quaint, iconic cultural landscapes.


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Satellite Image, Landscape Analysis: Venice

Satellite Image, Landscape Analysis: Venice | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Credits: European Space Imaging (EUSI)...

 

One of the great landscapes showing the human-environmental interaction so vividly. This image always reminds me of Deryck Holdsworth's lectures at Penn State about Venice and the urban historical geographies of trade, commerce and commodities.  This image exemplifies some of the key advantages in the earliest iterations of the globalizing forces that created the modern global economy.   


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 12, 2013 12:50 PM

One of the great landscapes showing the human-environmental interaction so vividly. This image always reminds me of Deryck Holdsworth's lectures at Penn State about Venice and the urban historical geographies of trade, commerce and commodities.  This image exemplifies some of the key advantages in the earliest iterations of the globalizing forces that created the modern global economy.  

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 12, 2013 12:51 PM

One of the great landscapes showing the human-environmental interaction so vividly. This image always reminds me of Deryck Holdsworth's lectures at Penn State about Venice and the urban historical geographies of trade, commerce and commodities.  This image exemplifies some of the key advantages in the earliest iterations of the globalizing forces that created the modern global economy.  

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No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe

No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Birthrates across the Continent are falling at drastic and, to many, alarming rates. Why are Europeans so hesitant to have children, and what does it mean for their future and for ours?

 

Nice piece that show work well for understanding the demographic transition, which links population growth rates with levels of human development.


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 6, 2013 9:28 PM

Amazing to see that the birth rates are so low in Europe.  When at one time there were soo many people that many of them were part of the huge immigration to the US in the 19th and early 20th century.  Now some of these nations are having worker shortages as their populations get older.  The result of this is workers from other countries moving into European countries to work and fill the jobs.  This in turn has led to racial tensions in some European countires where people are stating that the jobs are being taken by these foregin workers.  However, it is the people of these countries that have having fewer children, whether it be a lifestyle choice or just plain economic factors.  It becomes a circular argument eventaully.  Will there be a change in the birth rate in Europe?  Only time will tell, but by the looks of itm it is not going to be anytime soon.  

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 2:39 PM
That is very odd because usually it is the Europeans who want to have many kids. It seems that the Europeans are not so interested in having kids. They just want to enjoy their lives to the fullest. Not having kids could be a bad thing for the population. One reason would be the family genes would be gone because there are no more family members to keep it going. There is one good thing to the decrease of population, which are less people to care for in the world. But Europe should have seen this coming because there was at one point in time there were the most populated country now it has changed to the least populated who would have thought that would happen. But having kids is a great accomplishment that not everyone can have. Many people have disease that stop the production of having kids.
Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 4:14 PM

This is showing how in the future due to more woman's rights and better  education systems, woman are losing interest in having babies at an early age. Therefore the population in Europe is declining.