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Declining Fertility Rates

Declining Fertility Rates | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The American birthrate is at a record low. What happens when having it all means not having children?

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Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:36 AM
Children are our legacy, they are our future, and if the birth rate keeps depleting then who will be here to be pur next scientists or doctors? Then again a plus to this situation is how much lower the birth rate is, the more resources we have to equally share (i.e oil, food water etc.)
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:34 AM

In recent research people found that some women are content with not having any children. People might think this way because without a child people are able to do more things like go out or travel. Some may not want children due to expenses. If more people do not want children birth rates could decline over the years.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:23 PM

Not to bulky on information but it gets its point across. why are theyre so many social stigmas around having a kid?  A kid cost a little over a million dollars to raise why should it be looked down apon for choosing not to take the finacial and physical hardship. I personally have been on the fence about the subject because Im not a fan of this world is coming to and i wouldnt want to have someone I dearly care about to have to go through it. But thats neither hear nor there. 

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White deaths outnumber births in US

White deaths outnumber births in US | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Deaths of white people outnumbered births for the very first time in US history, the Census Bureau revealed Thursday. The census predicts that significant drops in birth rates v death rates will be regular by 2025.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 6, 2013 1:00 PM

The United States as a whole does not have demographic numbers similar to European countries with declining populations...but 'white' America does.  The NY Times also noted that this statistical benchmark happened, but it was quietly mentioned with many other demographic statistics without an analysis of how this will impact the United States.  

Question to Ponder: how will this impact the United States in coming generations?  What will the cultural, economic and political impacts be?  Why explains the differents between the distinct populations in the United States?


Tags: USA, declining population, population, demographicsethnicity.

Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 10, 2013 12:41 PM

Shrinking white demographics will definitely have an effect on voting blocks in the future.  I would not be surprised if redistricting becomes a very important issue in upcoming elections.  And why was there an attempt to down play the significance of this statistic in the NY Times.  Are they trying to hide this fact from the public? What do they think will happen when it is discovered?

Sara Kanewske's curator insight, July 12, 2013 10:08 PM

Population

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Technology and Tradition Collide: From Gender Bias to Sex Selection

Technology and Tradition Collide:  From Gender Bias to Sex Selection | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Every year, as a result of prenatal sex selection, 1.5 million girls around the world are missing at birth.  How do we know these girls are missing if they were never born? Under normal circumstances, about 102 to 107 male babies are born for every 100 female babies born. This is called the sex ratio at birth, or SRB."

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 2013 3:23 PM

How do local cultures create these demographic statistics?  How do these demographic statistics impact local cultures? 


Tags: gender, technologyfolk culture, statistics, China, population.

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Thomas Malthus and Population Growth

Learn more: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=r1ywppAJ1xs Thomas Malthus's views on population. Malthusian limits.

 

This is a succinct (but not perfect) summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHG,  unit 2 population. 


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 25, 2013 11:01 PM

We will be learning about Malthus in Chapter 2.  Take a sneek peek!

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 11:57 AM

The Malthusian ideas maintain that food growth is only linear, while population growth is geometric, so soon population will outgrow food production and famines will occur,

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 7:12 PM

This video very well explains the malthusian theory and how it is associated with population

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Interactive World Statistics

Interactive World Statistics | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Brazilian government's geographic department (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística-roughly equivalent to the U.S. Census Bureau) has compiled an fantastic interactive world factbook (available in English and Spanish as well as Portuguese).  The ease of navigation allows the user to conduct a specific search of simply explore demographic, economic, environmental and development data on any country in the world.    

 

Tags: population, worldwide, statistics, mapping, zbestofzbest.


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Leonardo Martins's comment, October 20, 2012 11:08 AM
So cool…thank you very much!
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 24, 2012 10:23 AM
The world, here, is literally at your fingertips. It is a simple way for anyone to locate a multitude of data about any given place around the world. It is another way that brings the whole world that much closer in this technological era.
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NYTimes: Older to Wed, If They Marry at All

NYTimes: Older to Wed, If They Marry at All | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The median age of first marriage is at an all-time high, according to a new report from Pew Research Center based on census data.

 

Clearly the marrying patterns of Americans have dramatically changed since 1960.  What cultural impacts are changing these patterns?  What economic factors are shaping marriage decisions?  How does this change demographic patterns?  Society as a whole?  http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2011/12/14/barely-half-of-u-s-adults-are-married-a-record-low/ for more information on these patterns.  


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Latin@s are contributing most to the declining U.S. birth rate

Latin@s are contributing most to the declining U.S. birth rate | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The U.S. birth rate has dropped over the last two years, and each ethnic group within the United States has seen a decline in birth rates. What may surprise some is that the Latino population has seen the greatest drop in birth rates, declining by 5%. Fertility rates in the country are also at their lowest since the 1990s. What will this mean for the future of the U.S.? How does this fit in with what we know about the Demographic Transition? What factors account for the largest drop in birth rates coming from the Latino population?


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NPR Video: Visualizing How A Population Hits 7 Billion

The United Nations says today symbolically marks the moment when the world's population reaches 7 billion. A little more than two centuries ago, the global population was 1 billion. How did it grow so big so fast?

 

This is an excellent way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model. 


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StateMaster - US Statistics, State Comparisons

StateMaster - US Statistics, State Comparisons | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
State comparisons using graphs, maps. Huge database of US statistics. Reference site contains states statistics, maps, flags, graphs and pie charts.

 

Here is some great comparative data at the state level for the United States.  There are numerous thematic categories from which to choose. 

 


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NationMaster - World Statistics, Country Comparisons

NationMaster - World Statistics, Country Comparisons | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Country comparisons using graphs, maps. Huge database of world statistics. Reference site contains country statistics, maps, flags, graphs and pie charts.

 

This is excellent for national side-by-side comparisons with a whole host of thematic datasets to choose from.  This easy portal can demystify the idea of producing a data-driven paper or project. 


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Brandon Murphy's comment, July 9, 2012 7:00 PM
I find this tool to be very useful and interesting as well. However, I am not surprised as to how low the United States ranks on most statistics, especially Education. The United States has the potential and the resources to be in the top 3 in terms of education, but due to policy differences within the states an as a country at large we fall short of that. We know what needs to be done, but the right methods/policy are considered too "socialist" therefore they can't be done. It obviously works, just take a look at where Finland ranks in terms of Education.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 9, 2012 10:10 PM
I agree that this website is very interesting and it will surely not be the last time a visit it. I am also not surprised either on our educational ranking, but at least America is ranked 1st when it comes to incarcerating our own citizens. Makes you wonder how great the negative correlation between education and crime really is?
Ms. Harrington's comment, July 10, 2012 10:05 PM
This is a dense resource, I will have to come back time and time again to continue to compare nations and view all available statistics. I particularly liked the breakdown of American government demographics, such as being 80th in number of women in government.
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WPost: Amid population boom, India hopes for ‘demographic dividend’ but fears disaster

WPost: Amid population boom, India hopes for ‘demographic dividend’ but fears disaster | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
With the world’s population nearing 7 billion, India warns of a “demographic disaster” if it cannot provide jobs and services for its young people.

 

Global population analysis and local impacts complete with population pyramids.


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NYTimes: Fewer Babies, for Better or Worse - Room for Debate

NYTimes: Fewer Babies, for Better or Worse - Room for Debate | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
As European, Chinese and American women have fewer children, is the global economy endangered? Or is this easing the burden on a crowded planet?

 

This links you to articles by 7 different scholars about the economic, environmental, cultural and demographic impacts that lowering birth rates and fertility rates are having on more developed countries.  This is an excellent way to get students to evaluate diverse academic positions and start forming their own (more informed) opinions.  


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Animated U. S. Population Pyramid (1950-2010)

Animated U. S. Population Pyramid (1950-2010) | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a simple, yet incredibly powerful graphic that helps to show the changing nature of population structure as a country moved to a different stage in the demographic transition (the link takes you to the animated version).  


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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, August 4, 2013 1:45 PM

Awesome way to show how the settlement of the US continues to move west with the population growing on the West Coast at a faster rate.  If you look at the biggest jump between 1850 and 1860 it shows the mass immigration into the US and the further migration to the western part of the US especailly with the gold rush starting in 1849.  Great littel piece of information.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

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UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier

UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

The UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier
Summary:

The number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births currently totals 51.6, and is expected to drop sharply to 12.1 by the end of the century.The country will also grow steadily older, with the current median age of 18 expected to more than double -- to 37 years of age -- by 2100.A Kenyan born this year can expect to live for 61.6 years.The nation's population will reach 160 million by the start of the next century, according to the new outlook.
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 4:59 PM

The UN projects that Kenyans will grow older and healthier. Infant deaths will decrease and age expectancy will increase. What will Kenyans have to do to be healthier? Lifestyle changes?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 1:49 PM

This article provides statistics for the population growth of Kenya and other African nations in relation to the rest of the world. Africa features some of the world's highest birthrates and the world's youngest population. In Kenya, improving healthcare will see the life expectancy rise significantly due to less infant death while the population will become older as birthrates begin to decline, as they tend to do as a nation develops, but not before Kenya becomes one of the more populous nations in the world.

 

Kenya's growing population and increasing median age could mean good things for its economic prospects. Population growth along with maturation means there is a large and capable workforce available, but Kenya must have the resources and abilities to create jobs for its burgeoning population or face widespread poverty.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 4:01 PM

As the years go on, the world is learning how to live longer. With new medicinal practices and people supplying clean water and food to third world countries, there is definitely room for Kenya to grow old with the U.S. and other countries that have higher life expectancies.

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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article.


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Scott D.Warner, R.L.S.'s curator insight, August 3, 2013 4:59 PM

Various historical essays on population have captured the attention of many who may have otherwise tended to be indifferent to what had been obvious to the authors all along.

Scott D.Warner, R.L.S.'s comment, August 3, 2013 5:03 PM
Population density dependent malfunctions in societies include crime, disease, and even war.
Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 10:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

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Russians are leaving the country in droves

Russians are leaving the country in droves | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Over a bottle of vodka and a traditional Russian salad of pickles, sausage and potatoes tossed in mayonnaise, a group of friends raised their glasses and wished Igor Irtenyev and his family a happy journey to Israel.

 

My regional class has been learning about Russia this week and when I first started teaching a few years ago, I would teach that Russia had a population of 145 million.  Today it is 141 million and part of that is due to migrants leaving a country that they see as lacking in economic opportunities and political freedoms (another part of the story is that birth rates plummeted after the collapse of the Soviet Union in what demographers have called the "Russian Cross").  In the last few years the population appears to have stabilized, but there are still many who do not see a vibrant future from themselves within Russia.  

 

Tags: Russia, migration, Demographics, immigration, unit 2 population.


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 28, 2013 11:44 PM

In the last 10 years about 1.25 million russians have emigrated out of Russia, but the way they do it is interesting. When they leave they dont sell their houses, or aparments, or cars they simply lock their doors and quietly slip away to the airports at night. The reasons for leaving are different thought, some are leaving because the prime minister is expected to return while some are leaving because of the awful econonmy. Either way the massive amounts of emigration is leading to a higher death rate then birth rate overall. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 1, 1:23 AM

This article from a couple years ago is about Russian emigration. A large number of Russians were leaving the country for better economic opportunity. Some cite the overbearing rule of Putin, but the pay in other countries is just better than what Russia can offer. This was particularly the case for the more educated, another instance of "brain drain" hurting a nation which is already in trouble.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 12:00 PM

Migration occurs for many reasons. People move from country to country every day. Leaving Russia was this families choice and moving to Israel can have an impact on them greater than if they were to stay in Russia.

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Selling condoms in the Congo

TED Talks HIV is a serious problem in the DR Congo, and aid agencies have flooded the country with free and cheap condoms. But few people are using them. Why?

 

This video highlights why some well-intending NGOs with excellent plans for the developing world don't have the impact they are hoping for. Cultural barriers to diffusion abound and finding a way to make your idea resonate with your target audience takes some preparation. This also addresses some important demographic and health-related issues, so the clip could be used in a variety of places within the curriculum. FYI: this clip briefly shows some steamy condom ads.


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Derek Ethier's comment, November 5, 2012 2:26 PM
AIDs is an epidemic in Africa, so selling condoms in the Congo is a groundbreaking idea. In fact, I am surprised that no one had thought of this earlier. In a continent where millions are affected by AIDs, it is essential that measures be taken to prevent the spread of the deadly virus.
Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 9:45 PM

Marketing is not something I would have thought about when trying to get people in the Kongo to use condoms. Her research into the brands they use and why may save many lives.

Nick Flanagan's curator insight, December 12, 2012 8:27 PM

I was surprised actually that it took this long for someone to think of this, given the fact that the AIDS crisis in Africa is practically a pandemic.However it is a good idea that someone had finally started to do something about it.  

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The National Womb

The National Womb | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
Nagorno-Karabakh is paying couples to have children, but is the solution simply to increase the birthrate, without first improving education, infrastructure and employment opportunities?

 

This sits at the intersection of a population and political unit.  Why would the govt. encourage more births?  Is population growth a local or global issue?  How is scale a part of the geographic analysis? 


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BBC: Urbanization

BBC: Urbanization | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

A fantastic interactive map with population charts that show the massive explosion in urbanization since 1950 until the present.


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 4, 2011 11:22 AM
Thanks to my mentor teacher (when I was a student teaching myself in Utah with 9th graders) for finding this link. He's STILL helping me out all these years later...here's to all you mentoring the next generation of educators!
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TIME: 10 Fastest Growing Cities of Tomorrow

TIME: 10 Fastest Growing Cities of Tomorrow | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

Many cities are large; the rate at which these ten cities highlight a distinct spatial pattern and separate them from the rest. Which regions have the fastest growing cities? Which regions don't? Why geographic factor account for the rapid growth?

CITY                Increase by 2025

1.  Delhi          6.4 million

2.  Dhaka       6.3 m

3.  Kinshasa  6.3 m

4.  Mumbai   5.8 m

5.  Karachi    5.6 m

6.  Lagos        5.2 m

7.  Kolkata     4.6 m

8.  Shanghai  3.4 m

9.  Manila      3.3 m

10. Lahore     3.2 m

 


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Time: The 10 Biggest Megacities Today

Time: The 10 Biggest Megacities Today | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it

This article links the growing global population with the rise of megacities in the developing world.  

 

The largest megacities are:

 1.  Tokyo            32.5 million    

2.  Seoul             20.6 m

3.  Mexico City  20.5 m

4.  New York     19.8 m

5.  Mumbai        19.2 m

6.  Jakarta          18.9 m

7.  Sao Paulo      18.8 m

8.  Delhi              18.6 m

9.  Shanghai       16.7 m

10. Manila          16.3 m


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How big was the world's population when you were born?

How big was the world's population when you were born? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
The world's population is due to hit 7bn this October.

If today the world's population is (almost!) 7 billion, what was the population when you were born?  How much has the world's population changed in your lifetime?  This interactive link shows the acceleration of growth powerfully (disclaimer: the dataset only works on dates after 1951--hint: if it was before 1952, world population was smaller than 2.5 billion).


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, October 25, 2011 9:22 PM
During the year I was born the global population was about 5,053,230,502. Dijbouti, was the fastest growing country in the world and, Grenada was the slowest growing country. During my lifetime i feel as though the population had increased drastically. It makes me think if our population is going to continue to increase drastically or if it will slow down and stay at a steady population. There are only so many resources in the world and if we continue to grow they will eventually run out.
Seth Dixon's comment, October 28, 2011 2:21 PM
I'm 4.0 billion. The growth isn't a shocking as the acceleration rate.
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World population nears 7 billion: Can we handle it?

World population nears 7 billion: Can we handle it? | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
She's a 40-year-old mother of eight, with a ninth child due soon. The family homestead in a Burundi village is too small to provide enough food, and three of the children have quit school for lack of money to pay required fees.

 

Here are some more perspectives on demographics, climbing population totals and the consequences and realities of these numbers. 


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, October 19, 2011 5:46 PM
I do not believe we can continue to increase drastically in population and handle it. Natural resources eventually end. Agriculturally we may be able to grow crops and food but eventually that too will come to a shortage. With an increase in population we increase in levels of pollution in the air, soil, and water. Inadequate water supply for drinking and sewage is another problem we could face. Just overall we would increase in higher levels of poverty because the shortage of jobs would continue to increase. This would lead to an abundance of things such an malnutrition, starvation, increase in homeless population and so much more.
Seth Dixon's comment, October 21, 2011 1:01 PM
Back the Nepal forest video, sustainability of resource consumption is the key. There are complications with population growth no doubt...but which are the CULTURAL issues surrounding population growth?
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NYTimes video: Sweden's Immigrant Identity

NYTimes video: Sweden's Immigrant Identity | AP Human Geography Education | Scoop.it
One out of four Swedes are immigrants or have a parent with an immigrant background.

 

Demographic shifts leading to political and cultural tensions.   Europe, which historically has been a source of migrants, is relatively new to be a destination for migrants and that has heightened some of the conflicts. 


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 8, 2013 3:08 PM

Sweden is currently one of the most prosperous countries in the world.  Being so close and accessible to many neighboring European countries makes it that much more appealing and even easier for people to travel there.  The birth rates have slowed in recent years, meaning people of working age are slowly decreasing; less workers and less jobs can lower the economy.  After the conflicts in Syria, Sweden has even volunteered to house refugees to start new and in turn can help put the demographic shift on the upswing.  With such an inviting atmosphere in the Scandinavian region, it's no wonder why there are so many citizens with immigrant backgrounds.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 6:29 PM

This video is shows the changing demographics of Sweden. Sweden and several other wealthier countries of Europe are now destinations for immigrants where they were once the origin of them. The change is difficult for these nations as they are somewhat unprepared economically and politically for significant immigration.

 

The immigrants end up feeling unwanted in their new country and their old. This feeling of being unwanted is possibly worse than it would be in the United States, a country more accustomed to immigration.

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, March 29, 8:07 PM

This growingly intense immigration situation parallels that of our own here in the U.S. and in many other countries throughout the world. World citizens, refugees, don't feel at home in their birth country nor do they feel welcomed in their current home or host country. This puts a lot of stress and pressure on these already punished populations. That's not to say that the host countries concerned citizens don't have a reason to be worried, but are their responses appropriate or productive?