AP Human Geography
13 views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Sarah Ziolkowski from Cultural Geography
onto AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

A New Map Reveals the Geography of American TV News

A New Map Reveals the Geography of American TV News | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The visualization shows a world unevenly aglow with television attention.

Via Seth Dixon
Sarah Ziolkowski's insight:

This article applies to the concepts of culture unit, and more specifically, globalization. It talks about how most Americans receive news, which, not surprisingly, is the television. This produces confusion and miscommunication for viewers, and controls our news intake. The article shows a map how often a place is mentioned on a news broadcast, and its overwhelmingly uneven. Is this answered with population or something else? Whatever it is, this shows how our news is controlled, which controls our political views-your political views. Short term solution, get your news from different sources.

more...
No comment yet.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Sarah Ziolkowski from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

'Is Israel Its Own Worst Enemy?'

'Is Israel Its Own Worst Enemy?' | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
By isolating his country and expanding settlements, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel is undermining the peace process and his country’s future.

 

The geographic complexities in this region have lead to one of the most contentious and controverstial conflicts of our time.  How is culture a major determining factor in this political situation? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah Ziolkowski from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

A New Map Reveals the Geography of American TV News

A New Map Reveals the Geography of American TV News | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The visualization shows a world unevenly aglow with television attention.

Via Seth Dixon
Sarah Ziolkowski's insight:

This article applies to the concepts of culture unit, and more specifically, globalization. It talks about how most Americans receive news, which, not surprisingly, is the television. This produces confusion and miscommunication for viewers, and controls our news intake. The article shows a map how often a place is mentioned on a news broadcast, and its overwhelmingly uneven. Is this answered with population or something else? Whatever it is, this shows how our news is controlled, which controls our political views-your political views. Short term solution, get your news from different sources.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah Ziolkowski from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Germany Adds Lessons in Islam to Better Blend Its Melting Pot

Germany Adds Lessons in Islam to Better Blend Its Melting Pot | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Public schools for the first time are offering classes in Islam to primary school students to better integrate Germany’s large Muslim minority and to try to counter the influence of radical religious thinking.

Via Seth Dixon
Sarah Ziolkowski's insight:

This article applies to our unit of cultural differences in religion.The article talks about how these new classes in Hesse, Germany could lower radical religious thinking. This not only helps educate muslim children so their thinking doesn't become radical, but also educates the country to accept islam and not outcast those with that relgion. This could become a reality in your hometown if proved successful. In the future we can hope to see more tolerance and acceptance in the islamic faith and also tolerance for islamics in countries like Germany or maybe even The US.

more...
Jamison DuClos's curator insight, January 10, 2014 3:29 PM

This applies to culture.  Public schools for the first time are offering classes in Islam to help the Muslim minority and get rid of the radical religious thinking.  This could change other countries and cause them to do the same thing.  This can cause this country to dispose of its radical religious religious thinking with the next generation.  This can get rid of violence and other racial hates in Germany.

Isabelle Zahn's curator insight, January 18, 2014 7:48 PM

This article relates to our topic of religion and it  also relates to values and  globalization. In this article it talks about a school in Germany creating  classes in  Islam so that other people can understand them. Imagine how teachers had to go through so much more training just so that they were able to teach these new classes. This is helping to integrate Germany's  large Muslim minority and to trying to  counter the influence of radical religious thinking. This is the first time the public schools are offering classes in Islam. This has relevance and international communities because people also speak Islam and this isn't the only country that is starting to recognize it and wants to change this and create new classes for them so that they can be like everybody else. Some short-term effects could be other schools catching on and creating class is just for the Islam. Some long-term effects it could be every school having classes especially for the muslim kids. I'm also another long-term effect could be teachers having to learn Islam so that they do have the background to teach these kids if they ever were to come through their system. 

chris tobin's curator insight, February 6, 2014 4:15 PM

Many countries, including the U.S. has a Melting Pot of culture and I believe this cultivates better understanding and integration process

Rescooped by Sarah Ziolkowski from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Cycling Culture in Copenhagen

Cycling Culture in Copenhagen | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
More than a third of Copenhageners bike to school or work, but it hasn't always been that way -- and city officials say that's not nearly enough.

Biking here was stress-free — quite a contrast to my route to work in Seattle, which one international bike expert recently called “death-defying.”


Via Seth Dixon
Sarah Ziolkowski's insight:

This article applies to the  concepts of culture unit, specifically the diffusion section. It talks about Copenhagen's new cycling culture emerging after the government's efforts to neutralize CO2. 36% of the city's population bikes to work or school, a number they'd like to increase. However, they are still well ahead of The United State's highest percent in Portland, Oregon of 6%. Copenhagen's action could be a model for your community to change to biking. 

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 21, 2013 4:34 PM

Forms of transportation are typically seen in terms of technological developments, but the cultural institutions can either support or hinder the diffusion.  In Copenhagen, bikes are as common as vacuum cleaners because of a cultural movement supported by political initiatives to incentivize cycling and promote sustainable transit and active lifestyles.  Read the first part of this series where an American tourist is pleasantly baffled by European cycling culture. 

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 1, 2013 10:44 PM

Very good! 

Rescooped by Sarah Ziolkowski from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

As US demographics change, so does the menu

As US demographics change, so does the menu | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
MIAMI (AP) — Salsa overtaking ketchup as America's No. 1 condiment was just the start.

 

These days, tortillas outsell burger and hot dog buns; sales of tortilla chips trump potato chips; and tacos and burritos have become so ubiquitously "American," most people don't even consider them ethnic.  Welcome to the taste of American food in 2013.


Via Seth Dixon
Sarah Ziolkowski's insight:

This article  showcases the acculturation of Hispanic foods into the American menu, and applies  to the  concepts of culture unit. It focuses on the ever increasing sale of tortillas, salsa, and tortilla chips, and also the adaptation of Hispanic flavors and food into Classic American restaurants. This trend promotes predictions that tortilla chips will outsell potato chips, while salsa already outsells ketchup. Every community has proof of this, as ethnic foods begin to make their way out of the international food aisle and into the aisles of bread and condiments. 

more...
megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 5:20 PM

This article talks about how as we become more diverse in the United States our taste has changed as well. Alot of Latin Food has become the most popular food in stores or markets. Tortillas and salsa outselling potato chips or hot dogs. Times are changing as well as the demographic and its traditions.

Rescooped by Sarah Ziolkowski from Southmoore AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Afghanistan plan to stone adulterers to death

Afghanistan plan to stone adulterers to death | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Draft revision of penal code includes public punishment for married adulterers, a move harking back to Taliban rule.

Via Mr. David Burton
Sarah Ziolkowski's insight:

This article talks about bringing back a law to stone adulterers to death in view of public, as many human rights activists around the world condemn the plan and ask for rejection to the plan. This can relate to folk culture- a nation keeping laws that have been around from many years ago.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah Ziolkowski from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Immigrants wanted - But only if they ‘Slovakise’

Immigrants wanted - But only if they ‘Slovakise’ | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

SLOVAKIA needs migrants to meet the needs of its labour market, but government officials have made it clear that Slovakia will still expect migrants to “fully integrate."  What is the different between cultural assimilation and acculturation?  Why is Slovakia maintaining this cultural stance?  How will this impact Slovak society and immigrants?  Is this a good plan? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah Ziolkowski from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

What Facebook Tells Us About the Hidden Paths of Mass Migration

What Facebook Tells Us About the Hidden Paths of Mass Migration | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The basic shape of urban growth is easy to spot; we look at the fastest-growing cities, for example, or immigration numbers.

Via Seth Dixon
Sarah Ziolkowski's insight:

This article applies to diffusion and cultural regions. It talks about the migration patterns of those from the same place, moving to the same place. It shows us the pattern of group migration, one that is very important to understanding and easily discovered as to why migration is happening. This also applies to pop culture becuase the device used to create this map is Facebook. Its incredible that a social media site can produce this kind of information. This shows us that new social media sites are improving data and allowing us to explore many new things in human geography.

more...
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 5, 2014 9:51 PM

England is the 10th most popular for mass migration in the world. This map shows us as a society as to where people are escaping from and where people have settled along with the mass regional areas that have been affected by this Migrational chaos.

Rescooped by Sarah Ziolkowski from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Germany Fights Population Drop

Germany Fights Population Drop | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
As German towns work to hide the emptiness, demographers say a similar fate awaits other European countries, with frightening implications for the economy.

Via Seth Dixon
Sarah Ziolkowski's insight:

This article applies to how values and preferences impacts an area. For Germany, their low birth rates are being caused by highly valuing  single mothers and discouraging immigrants to stay in their country.  These  unfavorable birth rates may be a future for many other highly developed countries, or already are a part of many countries. This could happen to your home, so your values or preferences may be come a problem to the economy. Low birth rates and unwelcomed immigration are causing decreased work force and increased demand in Germany, that they can't fulfill. It also causes an uneven population between the young and old population. 

more...
John Burik's comment, August 16, 2013 1:33 PM
Guess Tea Party will have to adjust!
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 18, 2013 1:55 AM

Yes, identity!

Holly Hough's curator insight, December 8, 2013 8:35 PM

Germany is undergoing a population crisis. The population is plunging due to a high number of elderly people (the dependency ratio is 1:4) and the desire of women to be in the workforce. As a result, the women are not having children. There is a large number of young people who have obtained educations, but are unable to find work, which makes them less likely to want to have kids and start a family. This is a push factor for them to immigrate to another country where they can find work. This leaves Germany with higher dependency ratios and pushes them further towards economic crisis. Germany and many other European countries are offering incentives to women to have children, such as 24 hour child care, tax breaks, and money for married couples. Some fear fertility rates have fallen below replacement level. Just what will Germany do, “part of the solution lies in remaking values, customs and attitudes in a country that has a troubled history with accepting immigrants.” Germany will have to work to pull immigrants to their country to regenerate their population. Who knows where Germany will be 50 years from now?

Rescooped by Sarah Ziolkowski from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Computer Programming Used To Be Women’s Work

Computer Programming Used To Be Women’s Work | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Today, computer programmers are expected to be male, nerdy and antisocial - an odd, and self fulfilling prophesy that forgets the women that the entire field was built upon

Via Seth Dixon
Sarah Ziolkowski's insight:

This article applies to the  gender cultural differences sub unit. This article focuses on the change in gender roles in the computer software industry. An industry that males dominate today, was actually once considered a job for women. This wasn't becauseof gender equality, but that the cultural values for gender placed computer software as a job for women.  The few men in the computer industry put a lot of effort into taking women out of that work, and succeeded, completely changing the workforce in the computer software industry. This is a great example of cultural differences in our society and how much it can affect us. 

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 8, 2013 4:59 PM

This article highlights how notions of gender and gender roles are culturally mediated and change over time. 

Ashley Raposo's curator insight, October 17, 2013 12:56 AM

Computor programming was thought to be a woman's job, just like making your home work you can make a computer work. But when Men of the time saw this area of careers controlled by women they made it so tests for this career were targeted for men to pass. Now it is a science far from being it's once woman oriented path. Gender inequality is very simple to see in the eyes of a computer programmer.

Rescooped by Sarah Ziolkowski from Southmoore AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Wisconsin has grown into a hotbed of organic farming

Wisconsin has grown into a hotbed of organic farming | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Mr. David Burton
Sarah Ziolkowski's insight:

In this article you see enviornmental impacts from cultural attitudes and practices, and also acculturation. This article focuses on the many organic farms now in Wisconsin. It talks about the change that farmers should make to become organic, so pesticides are no longer affecting the enviornment or our food. Also, about the adaptation small family farms must make to become profitable in our society. They have the choice to become organic or become a large farm.

more...
No comment yet.