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The 11 American nations, in one map

The 11 American nations, in one map | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Red states and blue states? Flyover country and the coasts? How simplistic. Colin Woodard, a reporter at the Portland Press Herald and author of several books, says North America can be broken neatly into 11 separate nation-states, where dominant cultures explain our voting behaviors and attitudes toward everything from social issues to the role of government.

“The borders of my eleven American nations are reflected in many different types of maps — including maps showing the distribution of linguistic dialects, the spread of cultural artifacts, the prevalence of different religious denominations, and the county-by-county breakdown of voting in virtually every hotly contested presidential race in our history,” Woodard writes in the Fall 2013 issue of Tufts University’s alumni magazine. “Our continent’s famed mobility has been reinforcing, not dissolving, regional differences, as people increasingly sort themselves into like-minded communities.”

Take a look at his map.

 


Via Seth Dixon
Mrs. B's insight:

This is interesting map. Some parts are okay, however, the cartographer definitely wasn't a Texan! Appalchian land? What?

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 23, 2014 12:54 PM

The first thing I noticed about this map, and really liked, was that the nations extend past the borders of the United States. That allows these nations to reflect the similarities shared among large regions. These cultural, economic, and political regions reflect something that extends beyond the political borders of any one country. Southern Arizona is very similar to Mexico just like Northern Idaho is similar to Canada. The region labeled the Far West lumps together many different areas, likely because of the similar geography. However, there is more diversity in these areas than the map shows, for example there is a fairly big difference between the culture and political beliefs of Nevada and Utah, and western New Mexico is very different from Montana.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 12:31 PM

The way this map has been broken up is rather accurate. With the Greater Appalachia, stretching through West Virginia and into northwest Texas. Also, El Norte being separated due to the linguistic differences that have always been around that area.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, January 27, 2015 6:47 PM

This article was very interesting because it gave you a different way to look at not only the Unites States but the North American continent as well. I never realized that this continent can be broken into 11 separate nation-states. These 11 different divisions all represent and explain the different cultures or view points of the people living in them. The divisions can be a result anywhere from voting choices, social issues, religious beliefs, or just that particular type of community. I live in the Yankeedom. Northeastern states value education and are more comfortable with government regulation versus other areas. I was unaware that within the El Norte region, southwest Texas and the border region is the oldest and most different in America. Areas where independence was valued more had higher levels of violent deaths rather than the areas that had more government interventions.

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Similarities Between Spanish And Arabic

Spanish and Arabic have more in common than you think, and it's not a coincidence.

Via Seth Dixon
Mrs. B's insight:

These two languages are not in the same language family yet there are many similiarities (article with more connections that in the video).   I would like to challenge you educators to not just say to your students "these similarities are neat!"  Make the geographic connections to explain the 'why' behind this cultural pattern and the implications of it. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What past political factors led to this cultural convergence?  How were global regions different in the past?  What are the were the impacts of this convergence, both in the past and lingering results today?   

 

Tags: diffusion, language, toponyms, culture, colonialism, regions.

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ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 27, 7:29 AM

These two languages are not in the same language family yet there are many similiarities (article with more connections that in the video).   I would like to challenge you educators to not just say to your students "these similarities are neat!"  Make the geographic connections to explain the 'why' behind this cultural pattern and the implications of it. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What past political factors led to this cultural convergence?  How were global regions different in the past?  What are the were the impacts of this convergence, both in the past and lingering results today?   

 

Tags: diffusion, language, toponyms, culture, colonialism, regions.

Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, March 28, 10:55 AM

These two languages are not in the same language family yet there are many similiarities (article with more connections that in the video).   I would like to challenge you educators to not just say to your students "these similarities are neat!"  Make the geographic connections to explain the 'why' behind this cultural pattern and the implications of it. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What past political factors led to this cultural convergence?  How were global regions different in the past?  What are the were the impacts of this convergence, both in the past and lingering results today?   

 

Tags: diffusion, language, toponyms, culture, colonialism, regions.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 12:56 PM

These two languages are not in the same language family yet there are many similiarities (article with more connections that in the video).   I would like to challenge you educators to not just say to your students "these similarities are neat!"  Make the geographic connections to explain the 'why' behind this cultural pattern and the implications of it. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What past political factors led to this cultural convergence?  How were global regions different in the past?  What are the were the impacts of this convergence, both in the past and lingering results today?   

 

Tags: diffusion, language, toponyms, culture, colonialism, regions.

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The Role of Rural Women in Agriculture

The Role of Rural Women in Agriculture | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Women are the backbone of the development of rural and national economies. They comprise 43% of the world’s agricultural labor force, which rises to 70% in some countries. In Africa, 80% of the agricultural production comes from small farmers, who are mostly rural women. Women comprise the largest percentage of the workforce in the agricultural sector, but do not have access and control over all land and productive resources. Realizing the importance of rural women in agriculture is an important aspect of gender relations. In many countries, the role of women in agriculture is considered just to be a 'help' and not an important economic contribution to agricultural production. Giving support to rural women is a way of breaking the vicious cycle that leads to rural poverty and to the expansion of slums in the cities, where the poor get poorer. Development strategies should consider rural women as the epicenter, paying special attention to their social skills both within and without agriculture sector."


Via Seth Dixon
Mrs. B's insight:

While rural women play a substantial role in agriculture around the world, it is often not in positions of ownership, regional influence, and agency.  This is an article discussing how empowering rural women in the agricultural sector by changed the cultural and economic institutions that shape their work can truly change the world we live in.  

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, development, gender, agriculture, labor. 

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Jen Murray's curator insight, March 4, 9:55 AM

While rural women play a substantial role in agriculture around the world, it is often not in positions of ownership, regional influence, and agency.  This is an article discussing how empowering rural women in the agricultural sector by changed the cultural and economic institutions that shape their work can truly change the world we live in.  

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, development, gender, agriculture, labor. 

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 1, 7:34 AM

While rural women play a substantial role in agriculture around the world, it is often not in positions of ownership, regional influence, and agency.  This is an article discussing how empowering rural women in the agricultural sector by changed the cultural and economic institutions that shape their work can truly change the world we live in.  

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, development, gender, agriculture, labor. 

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 1, 7:34 AM

While rural women play a substantial role in agriculture around the world, it is often not in positions of ownership, regional influence, and agency.  This is an article discussing how empowering rural women in the agricultural sector by changed the cultural and economic institutions that shape their work can truly change the world we live in.  

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, development, gender, agriculture, labor. 

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EKOCENTER: Empowering Community Well-Being Through Social Enterprise

EKOCENTER: Empowering Community Well-Being Through Social Enterprise | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
To help provide communities in need with access to safe, drinking water and additional basic necessities, The Coca-Cola Company, together with DEKA R&D, and other partners launched EKOCENTER™ with Slingshot™ technology, a water purification system housed within the community center.
Mrs. B's insight:
Wow! Wow! Wow! This would be so perfect for the Maasai village we work with in TZ!
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Big Poultry Isn’t Just Terrible for Chickens—It Treats Farmers Poorly Too

Big Poultry Isn’t Just Terrible for Chickens—It Treats Farmers Poorly Too | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Sunday’s episode of ‘Last Week Tonight’ took an in-depth look at the plight of contract farming.
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Ethan Bernick's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:03 PM

Modern poultry farming is based on large scale, vertically integrated production. The farmers are usually at a loss of money due to the constant obsolescence of poultry houses.  

Barrett Baughn's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:03 PM

This article is about a show that every once and a while talks about animal cruelty in industry farms. However one night he talked more about how poorly the farmers are treated and how inhumane their jobs are. They are payed ridiculously poorly and they have to do things most people wouldn't be able to imagine. The worst part is that they are not allowed to talk about it or they run the risk of being fired and out of a job.

 

This is apart of our Agriculture unit. It describes what these workers have to go through everyday of their lives in poultry factories and how horrendous it really is. 

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:54 AM

This article talks about how poultry farm are not only treating their chickens bad, but also treating their farmers bad. The article gives two example of how farmers were scrutinized for allowing an animal welfare group to film and many more. 

 

This article relates to Unit 5: Agriculture, Food Production, and Rural Land Use because it talks about the cruelty and coldness of the poultry farms owners. It gives you inside on how bad it has gotten, and it promotes awareness of how we are allowing people to be I humane towards chickens and farmers. We should definitely do something because it will only get worse.

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What's on the Other Side of the Ocean?

What's on the Other Side of the Ocean? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
For anyone who's ever been on a beach and curious.
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zane alan berger's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:11 PM

this short blog simply shows a map of north and south america, demonstrating what countries are directly across from different parts of the continents.

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Ghana's women farmers resist the G7 plan to grab Africa's seeds

Ghana's women farmers resist the G7 plan to grab Africa's seeds | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Sharing and saving seed is a crucial part of traditional farming all over Africa, writes Heidi Chow. Maybe that's why governments, backed by multinational seed companies, are imposing oppressive seed laws that attack the continent's main food producers and open the way to industrial agribusiness. But Ghana's women farmers are having none of it.
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Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, May 25, 2015 3:17 PM

This article discusses how the sharing and saving of seeds for farming is being threatened by a new law, Monsanto's Law, which would restrict and forbid farmers to keep their seeds for the next year. Trading and saving seeds helps farmers know how the crop will do, and what type of environment is needed to ensure the most produce out of the crop. It also saves the farmers lots of money because they don't have to invest in buying new seeds for the new season. By passing this law, farmers will have to buy new commercialized seeds every season which could be fueled with GMOs, or may not be adapted to Africa's environment, this all threatens the profits and food farmers make. Women in Ghana, apart of the Rural Women's Farmers Association of Ghana, are resisting this law and trying to preserve the tradition of saving and trading seed. 

This article relates to Unit Five, Agriculture and Rural Land Use, because it shows traditional farming methods and how women in agriculture are trying to preserve tradition and prevent commercialized farming and seeds from coming to their communities. 

Ethan Bernick's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:16 PM

Women of Ghana rely on exchanging seeds to ensure good producing crop the next season. Corporations want to change the way these farmers get their seeds by making them buy the seeds from the companies instead.

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The Precision Agriculture Revolution

The Precision Agriculture Revolution | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Thousands of years ago, agriculture began as a highly site-specific activity. The first farmers were gardeners who nurtured individual plants, and they sought out the microclimates and patches of soil that favored those plants. But as farmers acquired scientific knowledge and mechanical expertise, they enlarged their plots, using standardized approaches—plowing the soil, spreading animal manure as fertilizer, rotating the crops from year to year—to boost crop yields. Over the years, they developed better methods of preparing the soil and protecting plants from insects and, eventually, machines to reduce the labor required. Starting in the nineteenth century, scientists invented chemical pesticides and used newly discovered genetic principles to select for more productive plants. Even though these methods maximized overall productivity, they led some areas within fields to underperform. Nonetheless, yields rose to once-unimaginable levels: for some crops, they increased tenfold from the nineteenth century to the present.  

Today, however, the trend toward ever more uniform practices is starting to reverse, thanks to what is known as 'precision agriculture.' Taking advantage of information technology, farmers can now collect precise data about their fields and use that knowledge to customize how they cultivate each square foot."

 

Tags: technology, food production, agriculture, agribusiness, spatial, GPS.


Via Seth Dixon
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Landon Conner's curator insight, November 3, 2015 8:57 PM

Our world has evolved and changed many ways in agriculture than it used to be. We've changed from horses pulling plows to using tractors with mowers on the back. Planting seeds by hand one at a time to using machines that can plant ten at a time five times faster. Watering plants one at a time to using water hoses. Our generation has advanced in farming technology and is helping our agricultural community. LDC

Cade Johns's curator insight, November 5, 2015 7:49 PM

Over the years agriculture has changed for the better,production has increased, pesticides have helped development,and technology has helped speed up the production and make the quantity bigger. CJ

Cade Johns's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:57 AM

Agriculture has evolved very much over time to many different methods of growing things and theyve changed the way we affect the soil.-CJ

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With Booze and Tobacco Taboo, Utah Leads Nation in Candy Eating

With Booze and Tobacco Taboo, Utah Leads Nation in Candy Eating | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"More than 60 percent of Utah’s residents are Mormons, who typically abstain from alcohol, caffeine and tobacco. With those vices frowned upon, candy is an acceptable treat.  Hispanics like Hershey’s Cookies ’n Creme bars in disproportionate numbers, and Minnesotan buy six-packs of Hershey bars at higher rates than any other Americans, particularly in the summer (think s’mores)."

 

Tags: food distribution, place, food, religion, ethnicity.


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Ethan Bernick's curator insight, May 26, 2015 8:29 PM

Each region of the USA varies at different degrees. The distribution of Mormons in Utah greatly increases the amount of candy consumed in the area. This could be a perceived region.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:15 PM

Me as a mormon completely understand the desire of candy. Yes alcohol, drugs, tobacco, ect is frowned upon but what intrigues me the most is how candy is so dominant in that region.

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 27, 2015 1:08 PM

More than 60 percent of Utah’s residents are Mormons, who typically abstain from alcohol, caffeine and tobacco. With those vices frowned upon, candy is an acceptable treat.  Hispanics like Hershey’s Cookies ’n Creme bars in disproportionate numbers, and Minnesotan buy six-packs of Hershey bars at higher rates than any other Americans, particularly in the summer (think s’mores).

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‘The True Cost’ Of The Five-Dollar Crop Top We’d Rather Forget

‘The True Cost’ Of The Five-Dollar Crop Top We’d Rather Forget | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
"I don't want anyone wearing anything that is produced by our blood."
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How Smartphones Affect Kids at School

How Smartphones Affect Kids at School | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
They gathered test scores from thousands of 16-year-olds across four cities in England from 2000 to 2012, tracking which schools started smartphone bans and what the effect was. Turns out that after a mobile ban was introduced in a school, teens boosted their test scores by 6 percent. “Our conclusion is that unstructured use of phones in schools has a negative impact, mainly for kids at the bottom half of the class,” Dr. Richard Murphy, assistant professor of Economics at the University of Texas and co-author of the study, tells Yahoo Parenting. This isn’t the only study to conclude that smartphone use affects grades.
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Katie's curator insight, May 21, 2015 10:53 PM

I agree that smart phones can effect student's grades. They distract students from learning. I think by banning cell phones from schools, may help some students, but may not push certain students to pay attention in class anymore than before. This negative impact of cell phones would be considered popular culture and globalization of technology.

zane alan berger's curator insight, May 22, 2015 3:04 PM

this article argues the case of new studies relating to phone use at school by students. The studies show that students without access to their phones at school do better academically, but it also acknowledges that parents and students both for the majority are against any campaigning to take away phones in school.

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 25, 2015 1:37 AM

This is an extremely interesting article. It has already been common sense that teens who spend more times on their smartphones worrying about social media and getting likes on Instagram so get lower test scores. This perfectly demonstrates the changing roles of technology. Technology was associated with expanding knowledge and connecting people and brilliant minds. However, now we're seeing the downsides of technology, showing the changing role of technology. Of course technology still has its good sides, such as connecting like-minded people to create brilliant ideas and inventions and spreading information like never before. Now technology is often viewed as a nuisance that plagues the minds of our teenagers. 

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Sweden: Rape Capital of the West

Sweden: Rape Capital of the West | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Forty years after the Swedish parliament unanimously decided to change the formerly homogenous Sweden into a multicultural country, violent crime has increased by 300% and rapes by 1,472%. Sweden is now number two on the list of rape countries, surpassed
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zane alan berger's curator insight, May 25, 2015 6:39 PM

this blog reveals the astounding number of rape crimes in Sweden. There is roughly a 66% crime rate in Sweden whereas in the United States there is around 25%, a distinct difference. This issue is related to gender equality.

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, May 26, 2015 5:01 PM

it is interesting it seems as if when a country looses its ethnic homogony crime rates increase dramatically, so is diversity really better? 

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13 maps about America worth bringing up at dinner parties and/or first dates

Did you know that Texas' economy is the same size as Australia's? Now tell your date.
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Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 6:20 PM

This article relates to unit 1 because it deals with different types of maps. In addition it deals with many types of thematic maps including choropleth maps. The article shows thirteen different maps  that are very interesting and informational.For example one of the maps shows places where billionaires live. it is cool to find out that notone billionaire   lives  in Delaware, Maine, North Dakota, or Alaska. Another interesting map is the map that shows us that New Orleans has about the same homicide rate as Honduras. This map is an example of a graduated symbol map because it uses different sized circles to show homicide rates in the United States and how those rates compare to other countries.   

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 3:20 AM

I loved this article. It really puts into perspective the demographics and geographical and spatial phenomenons that happen in the U.S. The map that was most shocking to me was the map demonstrating how that one circle in the northeast containing New York and Pennsylvania is 20% of the population that hold 50% of wealth in the United States. I could not believe it. I would expect that areas in Texas and California would hold more than 50% of the wealth, but I was proven wrong. I think it just shows the wealth disparity in America, and how the rich are becoming richer, and how the poor are becoming poorer. These maps shows their own importance. Maps not only demonstrate the absolute location of places, but they also show the social, political, and economic problems present in society. And that fact is what makes these maps so fascinating. Truly a picture can speak a thousand words, or should I say a map can speak a thousand truths.

Barrett Baughn's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:50 PM

This article is just an insight into the world of geography and it's different types of maps and how geographers and cartographers think. This allows us to look beyond physical maps and political maps and lets us dive deeper into the world of geography by allowing us to see the ideas of other cartographers and how these maps and can completely change how we see the world.

 

This is apart of or first unit. This is all about maps and the spatial perspective of other people and how they see the wold and how they are able to change our own perspectives using maps. 

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Austin, then and now

Austin, then and now | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Drag or swipe the slider to see how Austin's downtown skyline has changed over time."


Tags: urban, planning, urbanism.


Via Seth Dixon
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Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:29 PM

This can show how quickly areas can develop if giving the right economic opportunities and a strong government.  

Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:21 AM

A wave of New Urbanism has spread through Austin, with downtown growth, especially in high-rises on the rapid increase over the past decade as demand for high-price residences downtown rises with the influx of young and educated people into the city.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:35 AM

Services & Urbanization-CBD

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Global State of Agriculture

Global State of Agriculture | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Mrs. B's insight:

This conveys some important realities about the demographic necessities of agriculture, the economic impact and the cultural differences in agricultural production. As with all long infographics on this site, you can "scroll down" on the image by putting the cursor in the top right-hand corner of the image and sliding on the translucent bar. 


Tags: agriculture, infographic, unit 5 agriculture.

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Mercor's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:18 AM

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:30 AM

Unit V, main idea of the unit!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 15, 2014 10:00 AM

Unit 5

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France Declares All New Rooftops Must Be Topped With Plants Or Solar Panels | CSGlobe

France Declares All New Rooftops Must Be Topped With Plants Or Solar Panels | CSGlobe | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A new law recently passed in France mandates that all new buildings that are built in commercial zones in France must be partially covered in either plants
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zane alan berger's curator insight, May 26, 2015 5:54 PM

this blog recognizes the new law passed in France, requiring all new rooftops to be topped with plants and/or solar panels. This requirement influences green thinking and can be related to agriculture.

Barrett Baughn's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:57 PM

This article tells us about how France has started to demand that new buildings must have either plants or solar panels on them. This makes France a much more efficient area now because they will not need as many power plants and they won't need to burn as many fossil fuels for energy or have large farms for food. Instead this can all be provided locally due to this new law passed, making much easier and efficient rather than the old way of providing food and energy.

 

This has to do with our Urban Land Use unit. It points out that it is now a law to start putting these utilities up on top of these buildings to make their towns and cities more efficient so people don't have to drive around as much and overall don't have to burn as many fossil fuels.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:59 AM

The article talks about the new mandate in France that all new buildings in the commercial zone must have plants on the roof or solar panels. The article gives a list on the benefits of green roofs.

 

This article relates to Unit 6: Industrialization and Economic Development because it shows how France is taking steps to go green. I think this is a wonderful idea because it will help with sustainable development. 

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Map Reveals The Distinctive Cause Of Death In Each State

Map Reveals The Distinctive Cause Of Death In Each State | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
An analysis of mortality records uncovered the most distinctive cause of death in each state. In Texas, it's tuberculosis. In Maine, the flu. And in Nevada, it's "legal intervention."
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zane alan berger's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:15 PM

this blog maps out the most distinctive causes of death in all 50 states. It is color coded to broadcast the difference in cause within each state, and gives an analysis over this picture

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How suburban sprawl hurts the poor

Limited transit means there's no option for people who can't afford to drive.
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Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 5:35 PM

This article relates to unit 7 because it deals with ubran sprawl. We have learned that sprawling is bad because it can hurt the environment and the people who live in that area. In the article it explains how a man had to ride a bus 2.5 miles to and from work, and in addition to that walk a total of 21 miles round trip just to be able to do one days work. People then raised up enough money for him to be able to invest in a car. A transportation historian says that not owning a car is not the main problem, th emain problem is sprawling. car focused cities and poor public transportation doesn't provide good options for people who can't afford cars leading them to turn down job oppurtunities or take lesser paid jobs in the city. Since the 1990's most communities go to suburbs to work, because most people left the cities .to go to suburbs which caused job oppurtunities to follow them. The article also notes long comutes often cause lack of economic mobility.

Barrett Baughn's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:52 PM

This article is about urban sprawl and the poor layouts of US towns and transportation systems. It describes US cities by telling us that most them are fallen victims to urban sprawl due to baby booms in the 40's through the 60's. This has lead to poor planning of cities and makes it harder for the poor people to get around town and get to there jobs. This overall hurts the economy and the social aspect of the city.

 

This has to do with the Urban Land Use unit. It describes how urban sprawl, a term used when cities are expended, unplanned, due to the very fast increase of population and demand for housing. This leads to a lot of transportation problems and can be a great detriment to the cities economy.

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America Abroad: Understanding Islamic feminism

America Abroad: Understanding Islamic feminism | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
This discussion from the America Abroad series highlights the realities Muslim women who are seeking gender equality face around the world.
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zane alan berger's curator insight, May 26, 2015 5:58 PM

this blog provides audio from american abroad over muslim women seeking gender equality, and can be classified in gender equality.

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Afghanistan's Female Wardens

Afghanistan's Female Wardens | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
We meet the female rangers protecting Band-e-Amir, Afghanistan's first national park.
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Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, May 25, 2015 5:39 PM

This article discusses how women in Afghanistan, (in a country with only 16% of the women population working), have taken up jobs as park rangers in Afghanistan's first national park. Due to war and corruption it's common to find local villagers hunting the wildlife, over fishing, and cutting down vegetation. Afghan women have taken it upon themselves to help preserve their national park, and in the doing have broken the stereotype of jobless women in Afghanistan, and have encouraged other women to take up jobs, and hopefully increase the percentage of working women. 

This article relates to Unit Three, Cultural Patterns & Processes, because it shows how women in Afghanistan are breaking the gender stereotypes that lots of countries have in all aspects. 

zane alan berger's curator insight, May 25, 2015 6:56 PM

this blog focuses on Afghanistan's first national park. The blog recognizes this as a catalyst for tourism and a step towards equality in the middle east because of its hire of four female wardens.

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World's largest hotel coming to Mecca

World's largest hotel coming to Mecca | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Abraj Kudai, a complex in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, is set to become the world's largest hotel by room count when it opens in 2017.

Via Seth Dixon
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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 22, 2015 7:37 AM

The location of the hotel makes a lot of sense. Mecca is an obvious tourist destination. Muslims from all over the world, make the sacred pilgrimage to the holy city. Those same people, are in need of accommodations once they arrive in the city. The economic potential of such a hotel is outstanding. It was also interesting to learn that Las Vegas currently has four of the five largest hotels in the world. Even with the building of this hotel, I do not see Las Vegas being displaced as the worlds premier tourist destination.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 7:14 PM

this is hardly surprising, with how many people go to Mecca in a year. Mecca is probably the largest single destination for religious tourism in the world, and it is the only city on earth where there are religious obligations to enter the city .

Patty B's curator insight, March 11, 12:47 PM
I found this article to be pretty eye-opening. It shows how Capitalism has spread virtually everywhere, regardless of how many people from all around the world denounce its evil way. Just as many countries in South America utilize their beautiful weather and beaches to generate revenue, Saudi Arabia is planning to utilize Islam's holiest location to do the same. Some would claim this hotel to not be in the best interest of the Muslim religion, while others can't deny that it would generate a significant amount of revenue for the surrounding area. To me, as someone raised Catholic, this seems no different than there being hotels in Rome surrounding the Vatican. I understand the financial purposes for promoting tourism in such locations, but I can also understand how some can't help but feel a sense of disrespect when such things happen. It promotes the commercialism of locations and symbols that are extremely sacred to a great number of people. But it also helps the people of Mecca and greater Saudi Arabia live more comfortable lives in some way, be it improvement to infrastructure or investing to generate long-term income. 
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Why Can't Austin Have This Elaborate Subway System?

Why Can't Austin Have This Elaborate Subway System? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Update (June 17, 2014): This story from 2011 is enjoying a second-life on the Austin Reddit page. After being posted there it inspired a discussion with
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Campbell Ingraham's curator insight, May 25, 2015 2:11 PM

This article talks about an interview between KUT news and the man in charge of Austin Urban Development. The people of Austin wish to know, why can't Austin have an elaborate subway system for public transit? The answer all boils down to money. The cost would be 10 billion dollars, and construction would be close to impossible.

 

This article relates to contemporary patterns and impacts of industrialization and development. It shows how citizens of this city wonder why other cities can have this highly developed public transit while Austin cant. It all seems to rely on cost and natural resources used for transit development. People want this advanced public transit because they see it being developed across the country in other cities. These development patterns influence the wants of the people in Austin.

zane alan berger's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:04 PM

this blog recaps the interview between KUT news and the vice president of Capital metro over an elaborate subway system and why it cant be implemented here in Austin (lack of money/resources). this is related to urbanization

Barrett Baughn's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:08 PM

This article explains how a subway system has been drawn out for Austin isn't being put in place. This subway system, though expensive would be a great way to get rid of all the local problems. One of the biggest problems in Austin is drinking while driving due to Austin's crazy night life however with this system you would not have to drive after partying at night it would be a lot safer and faster than driving everywhere. 

 

This has to do with our Urban Land Use unit. It describes how cities' layouts are sometimes quite poor and how they can be improved in ways of transportation and urban planning like a subway system. 

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Why are more than 10 million homes vacant in India? - BBC News

Why are more than 10 million homes vacant in India? - BBC News | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Economic analyst Vivek Kaul on why millions of home are lying empty in India when the country is facing a shortage of housing.
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Lauren Quincy's curator insight, May 24, 2015 9:55 PM

Unit 7: Industrialization and Economic Development 

 

This article is about India and the shortage of housing even though there are millions of vacant houses in the nation. The article addresses the main issue for the amount of vacancy being that most of the homes are owned by the richer residents as an investment option. Many of the residents cannot afford the houses being built. This stresses the importance of homes needed in the periphery of India. 

 

This relates to this chapter because it deals with uneven development in India. It shows the differences in economy between the core and periphery that is leading to the shortages of housing. This shows the wide range of economic stature between residents that can afford multiple houses to people who cannot afford one. This gap in economy correlates to the development of the cities.  

Campbell Ingraham's curator insight, May 25, 2015 5:00 PM

This article talks about the large amount of unoccupied homes in suburban India. There are over 20 million people without homes in India, while there are empty homes in the suburbs. Why is this? Mainly because of high home prices. People remain homeless in India because they cannot afford these homes, and builders do not cater to the everyday citizen of India.

 

This article relates to the topic of income disparity. It talks about how income is unevenly distributed across India. Poor people are for the most part ignored and not helped by the ones who are better off and this results in an income inequality. 

Barrett Baughn's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:38 PM

This article talks about the problem with India and their population distribution. Even though millions of homes are vacant in India and millions of people don't have homes, they are still not able to live their. This is because of what people call "black money" which is money that  they possess but don't really own because of the amount of taxes they owe. This has lead to most of the Indian population living in slums with little to no plumbing, electricity and social needs. 

 

This has to do with our population unit and our urban unit. It not only describes the poor layout of India's cities and their way of housing people but it also talks about how most people are not very healthy or happy in India due to the inability to live in a decent home.

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Early men and women were equal, say scientists

Early men and women were equal, say scientists | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Study shows that modern hunter-gatherer tribes operate on egalitarian basis, suggesting inequality was an aberration that came with the advent of agriculture
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zane alan berger's curator insight, May 25, 2015 11:32 AM

this blog suggests that gender equality originated in hunter-gatherer times, and was abolished by the introduction of innovation, rather than  the theory that gender equality came in recent years (historically). This article is related to both the cultural and agricultural unit

Barrett Baughn's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:20 PM

This article is about how thousands of years ago, in hunter-gather communities that men and women were mostly seen as equals. This is because back then there wasn't anytime for luxury and fighting and all the people had to do was survive. However when the urban cities started popping up and more philosophers became to rise things changed and more people started to see men as stronger, smarter and just overall better than women which isn't true by America's modern standards.

 

This has to do with our culture unit. This article tells us about  how the culture of the world has changed over the past thousand years and how religion and beliefs that are very old are able to influence the beliefs of people today and how they see the world. 

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Zambia lifts big cat hunting ban - Africa Geographic

Zambia lifts big cat hunting ban - Africa Geographic | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Zambia lifts ban on safari hunting to attract tourists.
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Ethan Bernick's curator insight, May 19, 2015 9:22 PM

Interactions among different countries are increasing as a result of globalization. Interactions can be a good thing such as tourism.