AP Human Geography
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All the Countries of the World

Full album & lyrics: http://www.marblesthebrainstore.com/brain-beats-2 Music by Renald Francoeur, Drawing by Craighton Berman, Video by Don Markus "Tour the ...

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Love, love, love it!

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Marina Costanzo's curator insight, November 7, 2013 5:42 AM

Geograficamente parlando!!

Emma Boyle's curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:28 AM

The chorus gets a little old, but I dare you not to like this video.

Debriez22's curator insight, July 24, 10:57 PM

:)

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"Da Jesus Book" Is The Best Bible Translation

"Da Jesus Book" Is The Best Bible Translation | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
"You know, God neva send me, his Boy, inside da world fo punish da peopo."
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What is Pidgin and when is it used? Here is a good example from Hawaii.

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Our infant mortality rate is a national embarrassment

Our infant mortality rate is a national embarrassment | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

The United States has a higher infant mortality rate than any of the other 27 wealthy countries, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control. A baby born in the U.S. is nearly three times as likely to die during her first year of life as one born in Finland or Japan. That same American baby is about twice as likely to die in her first year as a Spanish or Korean one.

Despite healthcare spending levels that are significantly higher than any other country in the world, a baby born in the U.S. is less likely to see his first birthday than one born in Hungary, Poland or Slovakia. Or in Belarus. Or in Cuba, for that matter.

The U.S. rate of 6.1 infant deaths per 1,000 live births masks considerable state-level variation. If Alabama were a country, its rate of 8.7 infant deaths per 1,000 would place it slightly behind Lebanon in the world rankings. Mississippi, with its 9.6 deaths, would be somewhere between Botswana and Bahrain.

 


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Muslim Pilgrims Are Taking "Hajj Selfies" And Clerics Are Not Happy

Muslim Pilgrims Are Taking "Hajj Selfies" And Clerics Are Not Happy | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Clerics are reportedly condemning the latest "selfie fever" at Islam's holiest sites.

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Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 3:31 AM

It was only a matter of time before this happened...

CT Blake's curator insight, October 5, 10:57 AM

More instances of how tech and cultural diffusion can impact culture...and create cultural conflicts.

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The Most Complex International Borders in the World

"In this video I look at some of the most complex international border. Of course, there are more complex borders in the world, but this video looks at some of my favourites."


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ELAdvocacy's curator insight, October 3, 9:40 AM

There are so many reasons our immigrant students come to the United States.  Some stories are so complex and painful it can be extremely difficult for Americans to understand.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, October 3, 10:21 PM

Interesting!

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 5:39 AM

The Most Complex International Borders in the World

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World Record Mapping Event

World Record Mapping Event | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Join our FREE GIS Day World Record mapping event taking place during Geography Awareness week (Nov 17th -21nd 2014, video with more details).  With a local to global perspective, we want students to map their thoughts and feeling about their local area.

 

They can add their data to a global map that is shared with the world. Help us achieve our goal of having 100,000 students take part globally.  The event will provide great opportunities for:

 

Using the latest GIS technologySpatial thinkingData analysis with GISMap designConnecting students with their peers worldwide

Tags: mapping, GIS,  K12, ESRI, geospatial, edtech.

 


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CT Blake's curator insight, October 5, 10:40 AM

Aw ay for all of our students on a global basis!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 12:19 PM

We are totally doing this!!!! Unit 1

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NYC Streets Metamorphosis

There's nothing more dramatic than looking back five or ten years at Streetfilms footage to see how much the streets of New York City have changed. In this wonderful…
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Urban Geography...case study NYC!!!

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The myth of religious violence

The myth of religious violence | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The popular belief that religion is the cause of the world’s bloodiest conflicts is central to our modern conviction that faith and politics should never mix. But, Karen Armstrong writes, the messy history of their separation suggests it was never so simple

 

After a bumpy beginning, secularism has undoubtedly been valuable to the west, but we would be wrong to regard it as a universal law. It emerged as a particular and unique feature of the historical process in Europe; it was an evolutionary adaptation to a very specific set of circumstances. In a different environment, modernity may well take other forms. Many secular thinkers now regard “religion” as inherently belligerent and intolerant, and an irrational, backward and violent “other” to the peaceable and humane liberal state – an attitude with an unfortunate echo of the colonialist view of indigenous peoples as hopelessly “primitive”, mired in their benighted religious beliefs. There are consequences to our failure to understand that our secularism, and its understanding of the role of religion, is exceptional. When secularisation has been applied by force, it has provoked a fundamentalist reaction – and history shows that fundamentalist movements which come under attack invariably grow even more extreme. The fruits of this error are on display across the Middle East: when we look with horror upon the travesty of Isis, we would be wise to acknowledge that its barbaric violence may be, at least in part, the offspring of policies guided by our disdain.

 

Tags: religion, culture, conflict, political, geopolitics.


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Which States Are in the Midwest?

Which States Are in the Midwest? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Here's a somewhat regular argument I get in: Which states make up which regions of the United States? Some of these regions -- the West Coast, Mountain States, Southwest and Northeast are pretty cl...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 2:58 PM

Vernacular regions aren't defined by a one particular trait, but are how we think about places.  These 'regions of the mind' are how we organize information about places, which is why these regions aren't sharp or precise.  In a similar article, they investigate what we consider to be a part of the South using similar crowdsourcing data. 

 

Tags: USA. regionsmapping.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 11:07 PM

Unit 1 

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The Awful Reign of the Red Delicious

The Awful Reign of the Red Delicious | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"For at least 70 years, the Red Delicious has dominated apple production in the United States. But since the turn of the 21st century, as the market has filled with competitors—the Gala, the Fuji, the Honeycrisp—its lead has been narrowing. Annual output has plunged."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 23, 2:05 PM

The story of the Red Delicious is almost a perfect analogy for the food industry.  It was genetically selected for its marketable skin, an aesthetically sumptuous red.  The skin of the Red Delicious better covers bruises than other varieties and tastes more bitter.  Consumers were buying what the industry promoted and “eating with their eyes and not their mouths.”  But recently there has been a backlash in the United States and more American consumer are seeking out other varieties; meanwhile the apple producers are working on exporting this variety to around the world, but especially into Chinese markets.  


Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, agribusiness, USA

Linda Alexander's curator insight, September 25, 10:33 AM

I believe this is the rotten tasting apple that comes with your meals at Panera. 

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, September 29, 12:40 PM

I loved this article for so many reasons! One who doesn't love an old man who sticks it to the grocery store managers? Two this is a perfect example of what humans do to everything they touch. To munipulate an apples genetics so much that it no longer exists? Seriously? What ever happen to if it aint broke don't fix it? This is also the prime example of how we are as a society. As long as everything is shiny and pretty on the outside don't worry about the inside. Red Delicious apples have a nice attractive outside but the inside is usually blah..

 

I'll stick to my Honeycrisps!

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PenPal News Overview

PenPal News is an online program that connects thousands of students from around the world and across the country to practice a foreign language and/or discuss important…
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http://penpalschools.com/news/ ;

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Route of the Mormon pioneers from Nauvoo to Great Salt Lake

Route of the Mormon pioneers from Nauvoo to Great Salt Lake | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"This pictorial map, printed in 1899, commemorates the 1846-47 route of émigrés from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, as they made their way from Illinois to Utah."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 21, 3:50 PM

I found this map from Slate's historical blog, the Vault.  It is a fabulous historical map in various senses of the words.  1) it nicely documents the travels of Mormon pioneers with dates and other bits of information about their trek.  2) this map depicts an older cartographic tradition of infusing pictures into the margins of the map to enrich the visual experience.   

Utah Geographical Alliance's curator insight, September 21, 5:43 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

I found this map from Slate's historical blog, the Vault.  It is a fabulous historical map in various senses of the words.  1) it nicely documents the travels of Mormon pioneers with dates and other bits of information about their trek.  2) this map depicts an older cartographic tradition of infusing pictures into the margins of the map to enrich the visual experience.   

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Here's How The Map Of Europe Would Be Redrawn If All The Separatist Movements Get Their Way

Here's How The Map Of Europe Would Be Redrawn If All The Separatist Movements Get Their Way | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"From Catalonia and Basque Country in Spain to Veneto, South Tyrol, and the island of Sardinia in Italy to Flanders in Belgium, 'the precedent of the vote on self-determination will reverberate around the Continent,' The New York Times writes.

If you want a rough idea of how European borders would have to be redrawn if regions with a separatist agenda got their way, you can look at the map below, put together by the European Free Alliance, to which '40 progressive nationalist, regionalist and autonomous parties throughout the European Union' belong."


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Welcome to the Anthropocene

"A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. The film charts the growth of humanity into a global force on the equivalent scale to major geological processes."


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Diane Johnson's curator insight, September 22, 9:28 AM

More climate considerations

Olga Boldina's curator insight, September 24, 10:39 AM

добавить свой понимание ...

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, September 24, 11:55 AM

El Antropoceno,  nueva era geológica

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Hong Kong’s umbrella revolution

Hong Kong’s umbrella revolution | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The story behind the Hong Kong pro-democracy protests

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Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, October 8, 2:52 PM

What caught my attention was the name that this protest has ("umbrella revolution”). After investigating I could find why this protest has that name, the reason is  because the people who are protesting  used umbrellas to protect themselves from tear gas.The Occupy Central movement ( which is  a civil disobedience campaign initiated by Benny Tai Yiu-ting, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Hong Kong , and advocated by Occupy Central with Love and Peace) threatens to block financial and commercial center of Hong Kong if their demands are neglected: the resignation of the Chief Executive, Leung Chun-ying and the possibility of holding truly democratic elections in 2017. If none of the parties can agree I think there will be any solution for both parties and this will continue.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, October 10, 2:56 PM

The umbrella revolution in Hong Kong is simply that Protestants are using all kind of tools to block the tear gas that the police are pulling them. Protests in Hong Kong are to change some of the rules that Beijing has also want Leung Chun-ying resign his position. The vast majority of the protesters are young and who began the protests were also young people who are fighting for the good of their city.

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The Political Geography of Hong Kong's Protests

The Political Geography of Hong Kong's Protests | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The territory's residents are demanding democracy in city intersections, not central squares.

 

The significance of the protests, which have brought tens of thousands into the streets, lies not only in what protesters are demanding but also in where they're demanding it—and where they're not. Consider that pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong typically happen in Victoria Park, which is about two and a half miles from Central District and which hosts the annual June 4 candlelight vigil commemorating the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown in Beijing. This time around, however, few police or protesters have ventured there.

The unpredictable, spontaneous geography of the protests is important precisely because it transcends the status quo. It is a testament to how serious these demonstrations are that they refuse to be contained.

Tags: political, conflict, governance, China, East Asia.


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 6, 3:26 PM

The relative location of these protests are what is important in the OCLP movement. The protest are no longer contained to the Victoria Park, the are popping up in intersections and seriously disrupting the status quo of every day life in Hong Kong. The geography of these protest illustrate how different and important the OCLP movement may be. This movement shows how geography can help explain social movements. Because the OCLP movement is popping up in areas where no other protest have occurred, it is hinting to the possible large scale influence the movement might have.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 7, 10:02 AM

The increased visibility of the internet and globalization has made large scale demonstration not only a good way to show civil discontent but the preferred method of increasing awareness of an issues across the world. Because Hong Kong is such an integrated part of global economy, they can stage these massive protests without too much fear of violent police reaction, as the world will be quick to condemn such action as soon as it happens. While the protests started as a student movement, it has now spread throughout the city and both younger and older people, students and professionals, have begun to participate. This popular participation shows how serious these issues are to the people of Hong Kong.

Chandler and Zane's curator insight, October 16, 4:44 PM

Political: There have been lots of protest lately in China. Chief executive CY Leung announced that he is planning to shut down Hong Kong's  central district. People are not happy with this and the protest are becoming very big for this little island. 

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Media and Culture--Perspective and Bias

"Religious scholar Reza Aslan took some serious issue on CNN Monday night with Bill Maher‘s commentary about Islamic violence and oppression. Maher ended his show last Friday by going after liberals for being silent about the violence and oppression that goes on in Muslim nations. Aslan said on CNN that Maher’s arguments are just very unsophisticated.  He said these 'facile arguments' might sound good, but not all Muslim nations are the same. Aslan explained that female mutilation is an African problem, not a Muslim one, and there are Muslim-majority nations where women are treated better and there are even female leaders."


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Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 3:02 PM

I completely agree with religious scholar Reza Aslan. I feel too often in the conversation about the Islamic religion people and countries are put under these "umbrella" terms. To say countries like Pakistan and Saudi Arabia (that are Muslim) are prime examples of what all Muslim countries are like is illogical. I agree when Aslan said that religion does not make people violent it is how people interpret it. I am also impressed that he is so passionate about his feelings that he did not feel the need to curb them while talking to the hosts of this show. We need more clarification and education so that these stereotypes will go away.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 8:31 PM

Aslan was pretty intense in his interview about violence and Islam.  Aslan's argument of issues being country oriented and not religiously oriented is something Americans need to think about more often.  We are quick to judge all Muslims based on the actions of extremists that are not necessarily acting from a religious stand point, but an ethnic stand point.

 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, October 24, 3:25 PM

This interesting how those who commit crime under the a religious group is seen as extremist. In that same context, while looking at those who commit the crime, people who are associated with the religious group is marked as terrorist. Its dangerous how the west (USA) have a tendency to classify people from different regions based on their religious practice. We disregard their way of life, and customs. Religious scholar Reza Aslan does an excellent job at breaking down the image that we paint in regards to people who are of the Muslim religion.

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‘Tiny houses’ will make up Austin’s new homeless community

‘Tiny houses’ will make up Austin’s new homeless community | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A 27-acre master planned community will boast the cheapest housing in Austin and it's all geared toward the chronically homeless.
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Urban Unit!!!!

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The Crazy Scientist Behind One Of The Most-Watched TED Talks Explains Ebola In 90 Seconds

Things that matter. Pass 'em on.
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Okay, number one. Hans is not crazy...he RULES our immigration and migration unit. He is totally awesome. This is an interesting scoop that will preface this video on Ghana and access to basic health care:

http://vimeo.com/32808501  ;

And that TED talk they are referencing...we watch it too! And it contains good news!

All of these make sense when we get to the Demographic Transition Model in Unit 2....but scoop when you see something that piques your interest....then you can connect it later because EVERYTHING IS GEOGRAPHY AND GEOGRAPHY IS EVERYTHING!!!!

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Geography Soup

"A great resource full of great links to accompany the Geography Soup channel on Vimeo."  


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Awesome videos to rescoop from!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 2:19 PM

Geography Soup is a Vimeo channel designed to include interesting videos that are laden with geographic content in them.  This powerpoint slideshow has resources designed to help you get the most flavor and substance out of these (and any other) video resources.   This is especially great for K-12 students, physical and regional geography.


Tags: K12, video.

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Water In Crisis - Spotlight Tanzania

Water In Crisis - Spotlight Tanzania | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Learn about the water crisis facing Tanzania.
Mrs. B's insight:

I am currently doing research on water wells in Tanzania...

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Cultural Patterns and Food

"Berlin Bureau Chief Michael Slackman looks into the obsession with currywurst, a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder, and brings different Berliners together."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 24, 8:43 AM

This short video has been added to the the interactive map, Place-Based Geography VideosThis depiction of street foods in German cities is a rich, tangible example to show cultural patterns and processes.  Currywurst is a unifying force across socioeconomic classes in Germany, but it is also a product of globalization and cultural interactions across regions.  Culture is not static and this New York Times video can be used to teach the various concepts of culture; per the updated APHG outline, the initial concepts of culture are:  

  • Culture traits
  • Diffusion patterns
  • Acculturation, assimilation and multiculturalism
  • Culture region, vernacular region, cultural hearth
  • Globalization and the effects of technology on culture.


Question to Ponder: How are these 5 major elements of culture seen in this video?


Tags: food, migration, culturediffusion, globalization, consumption, APHG.

Adriene Mannas's curator insight, September 25, 8:00 PM

Unit 1! Culture

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 11:08 PM

Unit 3

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A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates

A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"In a paper published Thursday in Science, demographers from several universities and the United Nations Population Division conclude that instead of leveling off in the second half of the 21st century, as the UN predicted less than a decade ago, the world's population will continue to grow beyond 2100."


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 27, 10:55 AM

NeoMalthusians will gloat over this. How much population can the earth support? Thank goodness we are thinking human beings and when faced with a challenge, we begin to problem solve. Time to get started!

Linda Rutledge Hudson's curator insight, September 29, 8:11 AM

I've been watching the numbers for some time and have felt, and told my students -- we would grow faster and more than previous predictions.  They have changed the #'s a few times.  This estimate seems more reasonable.

 

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, October 2, 10:57 PM

This unit focuses on immigration and population. This article shows the aftermath of both. 

 

The Earth's population is currently at about 7.1 billion people. By the time people of my generation are old and ailing, we'll be at about a 35% increase! We can't even feed ourselves now. How will we feed 11 Billion? 

 

Scientists stress the importance of education—especially women in developing countries—and believe the problem can be controlled and dealt with. 

 

There are many issues that are sure to come in the advancing years—regarding ethics, politics, human rights, of course—but there is no way to be sure. 

 

Buckle up, everyone. It's gonna be a bumpy ride. 

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13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world

13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The transition from childhood to adulthood -- the 'coming of age' of boys who become young men and girls who become young women -- is a significant stepping stone in everyone’s life. But the age at which this happens, and how a child celebrates their rite of passage into adolescence, depends entirely on where they live and what culture they grow up in.  Looking back, we'll never forget the majesty that was prom, or the excitement of hitting the dance floor at our friends' co-ed Bar and Bat Mitzvah parties, and why should we? Embarassing or amazing, they were pivotal moments in our lives that deserve remembering. On that note, here are thirteen of it the world’s most diverse coming of age traditions."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, culture, indigenous, worldwide.


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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, September 29, 5:04 PM

Love seeing the many different traditions that people do when coming of age and also traditions in general. Growing up living in the United States my family still followed the many traditions they had where they came from. Both my parents are from Colombia and they brought down many of there family traditions and also world wide Spanish traditions also. For example, my sweet 15 was a very memorable tradition that many young Spanish girls have once they turn 15. Its a big celebration and festivities that are all very much traditional for us. Its interesting learning the traditions others have and learning about new places.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 11:20 PM

Unit 3

Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, October 3, 3:07 AM
Its interesting to see the different cultural traditions that are set at different stages in a persons life as the beginning into adulthood for most. I don't think I would want to be a male in the Brazilian Amazon, or the island of Vanuatu where you literally put your life on the line to prove your ready for adulthood. It shows the differences and what is considered important or the role the person plays in society. I think the mention of the sweet 16 for American girls was a pretty weak presentation. America is a melting pot and represents so much more than that.

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Using Google Earth to Track Down Criminals

Authorities use Google Earth to crack down on illegal activities.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 23, 8:48 PM

This is an old clip, but a useful platform to discuss the ethics involved in using geospatial technologies, the expectations of privacy and issues of governance.  This could also be used to discuss urban political geography and principles of planning.  What are the limits to the legal and ethical uses of technologies?


Tags: google, mapping, geospatial.

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 28, 8:19 PM

I think this is a good tool to the authorities to keep a eye on criminal people. Some people may feel that some one is always watching you because of these, but lets see the good side, this could help the police to find criminals or illegals activities. In my opinion these is a good idea.

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Why The U.S. Chills Its Eggs And Most Of The World Doesn't

Why The U.S. Chills Its Eggs And Most Of The World Doesn't | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
In many countries, eggs aren't refrigerated and they're still considered safe to eat. But in the U.S., we have to chill them, because we've washed away the cuticle that protects them from bacteria.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 12, 12:29 PM

For many Americans that are traveling abroad for the first time, realizing that eggs aren't in the refrigerator is a bit of a culture shock (not to mention the moment they find milk in a box that also isn't being refrigerated).  Agricultural practices dictate storage requirements and some things we might have imagined were universal are actually place-specific or peculiar to our cultural setting.  What we are taught to think of as gross, appropriate, attractive or even sanitary is often steeped in a cultural context.  So is it strange the we refrigerate our eggs in the United States, or that they don't in other places? 


Tagsfood productiontechnology, industry, food, agriculture, perspective.

Diane Johnson's curator insight, September 22, 9:26 AM

Interesting investigation for students

aitouaddaC's comment, September 22, 5:16 PM
Amazing !