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Muslim beauty pageant challenges Miss World contest

Muslim beauty pageant challenges Miss World contest | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Muslim women from six countries defy western beauty ideals, emphasize spirituality.  Organizers of the event said they wanted to show Muslim women there is an alternative to the idea of beauty put forward by the British-run Miss World pageant. They also stress that opposition to the pageant can be expressed non-violently." 


Via Seth Dixon
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Rainer Emily's curator insight, October 1, 2013 11:38 AM

Social

 

This article is social because it is about a group of women who got together and challenged beauty ideals. 

Rawr_adventuretime's comment, October 3, 2013 1:27 PM
This is social because the gender relations is women defying ideas of beauty and expressing beauty through spirit instead of body and looks c:
Hannah Hitchcock's curator insight, December 13, 2013 1:54 PM

This article is a really good example on how beauty is a cultural perception. American pleople have a skewed idea of beauty, those shown above not being in that category. In other countries, these women might be extreamly beautiful, but the American perception doesn't believe the same things.  

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Charting culture

"This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble. The information comes from Freebase, a Google-owned database of well-known people and places, and other catalogues of notable individuals. The team is based at the University of Texas at Dallas."


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 10:47 AM

APHG-U3

wereldvak's curator insight, August 13, 10:00 AM

Geografische concepten als stedelijke ontwikkeling en diffusie patronen worden zichtbaar. Primate city en rank-size rule.....en demografische veranderingen in gebeiden.

Stewie Clock's curator insight, August 27, 9:25 PM

Hi it's one of your students try to guess who it is��

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The Coming Birth of The Empathic Civilization Will Be One of The Greatest Moments in Human History

The Coming Birth of The Empathic Civilization Will Be One of The Greatest Moments in Human History | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
11 minutes | "The Empathic Civilization" is one of the biggest ideas of the 21st century. The arrival of this era will be monumental. Jeremy Rifkin explains.
Mrs. B's insight:

LOVE this video!!!

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African borders

African borders | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"About the history of the creation of Africa borders and debates about African borders."


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Darleana McHenry's curator insight, June 26, 7:33 AM

I thought that this was interesting and decided to share it.

 

Beatrice Sarni's curator insight, July 7, 3:36 AM

always an interesting discussion...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:50 PM

APHG-U4

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Gallery: What inequality looks like

Gallery: What inequality looks like | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Artists, designers, photographers and activists share one image that encapsulates what inequality means to them.

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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 16, 9:28 AM

Galería de Imágenes acerca de la desigualdad como consecuencia de la pobreza.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 9:32 AM

powerful images that define unit 6!

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 7:07 AM

add your insight...

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Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, June 17, 8:33 AM

Extreme poverty is defined by the World Bank living on under $1.25 per day.  The geography of of extreme poverty highly uneven--two thirds of the extremely poor live in just 5 countries (India, China, Nigeria, Bangladesh and DR Congo)   - Seth Dixon

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 7:07 AM

add your insight...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 4:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

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Portolan Charts 'Too Accurate' to Be Medieval

Portolan Charts 'Too Accurate' to Be Medieval | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Portolan charts, it was always assumed, were compiled by medieval European mapmakers from contemporary sources. A Dutch doctoral dissertation now disproves this: these nautical charts are impossibly accurate, not just for medieval Europe, also for other likely sources, the Byzantines and the Arabs. So who made them – and when?


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If you put every living human on a pile, it would only take this space

If you put every living human on a pile, it would only take this space | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
According to the always entertaining Vsauce, this is the volume that the entire human population would take if you put everyone on a pile in the Grand Canyon. We are just a bunch of ants, yet we have managed to transform the entire landscape of Earth.*

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Stunning D-Day Maps From TIME Magazine

Stunning D-Day Maps From TIME Magazine | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
World War II-era maps conjure a period in history when titanic forces were on the move, or were stuck in brutal stalemate, all over the globe.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 5:44 PM

I was drawn to history and geography as a boy from war maps much like these.  I loved seeing patterns and a snapshot of historical events. 

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As Long as Female-Genital Mutilation Is Still Happening, Surgeons Will Fight It

As Long as Female-Genital Mutilation Is Still Happening, Surgeons Will Fight It | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A small number of surgeons are performing clitoral reconstruction procedures in the United States for victims of female-genital mutilation, offering a chance at physical recovery.
Mrs. B's insight:

This is good news in this otherwise disturbing and barbaric modern-day practice.

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What U.S. History Would Have Been Like With Hashtags

What U.S. History Would Have Been Like With Hashtags | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 14, 3:41 PM

This collection isn't meant to be serious, but these images would get students to think about how historical events were played out and see the internal social and political dynamics in ways that they can relate to. 

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What Are the Biggest Immigrant Groups in Your State?

What Are the Biggest Immigrant Groups in Your State? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Last month, I wrote about the fun and the pitfalls of viral maps, a feature that included 88 super-simple maps of my own creation. As a follow-up, I’ve written up a bunch of short items on some of those maps, walking through how I created them and how they succumb...
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This Facebook Page Allows Iranian Women to Share Selfies Sans Hijab

This Facebook Page Allows Iranian Women to Share Selfies Sans Hijab | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"A Facebook page called Stealthy Freedoms of Iranian Women has garnered more than 200,000 likes since its creation at the beginning of this month. The idea behind it is simple: an anonymous platform for Iranian women to post photos of themselves without their head scarves.

As Mid East Faces reports, Iranian journalist Masih Alinejad, who moved to London in 2009, decided to create the page after receiving countless complaints from her female friends back home. They were jealous of her Facebook photos of "her hair blowing in the wind," Mid East Faces writes. 

Alinejad told the Guardian that she doesn't judge when it comes to whether or not a woman in Iran wants to wear a hijab."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 19, 10:52 AM

The hijab is an incredibly complex cultural artifact full of social meanings all over the political spectrum.  This poster shows some of the social pressures exerted on women in Iran to wear the hijab.  Many hijab-wearing women don't want other women to be shamed into conforming.  

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Can You Identify These Cities From Their Light Signatures?

Can You Identify These Cities From Their Light Signatures? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The light that a city emits is like its glowing fingerprint. From the orderly grid of Manhattan, to the sprawling, snaking streets of Milan, to the bright contrast of Kuwait’s ring-roads, each city leaves its own pattern of tiny glowing dots. See if you can ID these cities based on the way they shine."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 12, 9:59 PM

This short quiz of 16 cities combines several analytic components of geography that you won't see in more standard map quizzes for regional geography;  this draws on some similar skills similar to the map quiz that was based on identifying the city based on Starbucks locations.  Some recognition of local spatial patterns from previous map analysis can make this quiz easier but there are still some cities that you haven't ever looked at from space before.  Things to consider as you attempt this quiz:  Which of the four possible selections can you rule out out?  What enabled you to eliminate those selections (e.g.-coastal, scale, size, grid pattern, transportation systems, density, etc.)?  What does to layout of the city tell us about the planning and historical origins of the city?  Is there one urban model that best helps us explain the configuration of this city?     


Tags: urbanmodels, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 citiestrivia.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 14, 11:00 AM

Geography education

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How pig parts make the world turn

How pig parts make the world turn | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Christien Meindertsma, author of "Pig 05049" looks at the astonishing afterlife of the ordinary pig, parts of which make their way into at least 185 non-pork products, from bullets to artificial hearts.
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The Language of Maps Kids Should Know

The Language of Maps Kids Should Know | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The vocabulary and concepts of maps kids should learn to enhance their map-skills & geography awareness. Concise definitions with clear illustrations.

 


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Anita Vance's curator insight, June 30, 8:54 AM

This article helps give an early start to map skill implementation - even at the earliest levels.

DTLLS tutor's curator insight, July 1, 5:04 AM

Love this website. Not just this article, but the whole idea. Have a little browse around...

wereldvak's curator insight, July 6, 2:53 PM

De taal van de kaart: welke  woordenschat hebben kinderen nodig om de kaart te kunnen lezen?

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The Beginning of a Caliphate: The Spread of ISIS

The Beginning of a Caliphate: The Spread of ISIS | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
With Tuesday's seizure of Mosul, Iraq's second largest city, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria notched a major victory in its campaign to create a new country containing parts of what had part of both Syria and Iraq. On Wednesday, the insurgents continued their march south, taking control of Tikrit, the hometown of Saddam Hussein.

 

The story of ISIS's spread -- and its influence -- is one that begins in Syria, where the group has been waging a brutal insurgency against the regime of Bashar al-Assad and, increasingly, other more moderate and secular rebel groups. The map above depicts the areas of Syria under its control. The group's influence is bounded by the Free Syrian Army in the west, the Kurds in the north, and pockets of government influence.  Who is the ISIS/ISIL?

 

Tags: Syria, Iraq, MiddleEast, conflict, political, geopolitics.


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Eli Levine's curator insight, June 12, 9:18 PM

These folks are no good.

 

They're as dangerous, mean-spirited, and delusional as the conservatives of our own society.

 

Motivated by religious fervor (doesn't matter which one it is), and an authoritarian desire to impose their vision of how a perfect society ought to be, these people ought to be put into mental health clinics and given actual treatment for being dangers to themselves and dangers to others.

 

We, the United States, cannot, and should not, do anything to stop ISIS initially.  We should let them take over, let their brutality lead to popular insurgency against them.

THEN, we ask the people of the region, collectively, whether or not they want our assistance in removing ISIS from control and influence in their society.  We want them to be turning these folks in, to be reporting those who are seeking to join these conservative movements to authorities.  Then, we can advise the authorities to treat the incoming prisoner like the mentally ill and psychologically disturbed/traumatized individuals that they seem to be.

 

We need a mandate and a request from the people living in their SOCIETIES, before we can go in and fight (if we're going to do such a thing, given our current state of war weariness and spent accounts).  We should not be taking direction just from their governments, and we shouldn't read their governments' requests as the need and will of their general public.

 

When fighting these kinds of conflicts, it's of the utmost importance that you maintain popular legitimacy and the mandate from the people to use force against what would otherwise be a persistent and deep-seated problem.  These conservatives can only be removed from the social scene when the public wants them to be removed AND, you must be as kind, benevolent, and effective as possible at handling the people afterward.  No impositions, no expectations; just let them lead their lives on their own, once you help them remove a tumor from their society that they want to have removed.  Nothing more.  Nothing less.

 

Think about it.

sledderwool's comment, June 13, 1:26 AM
Thats brilliant...
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Iraq's Current Devolution

"A radical fringe Islamic group names ISIS is fighting to establish a extremist Islamic state in Iraq and Syria...and beyond. They control eastern Syria, western Iraq, just took control of Iraq's 2nd largest city of Mosul and are advancing on the capital Baghdad.  In this podcast, the professor John Boyer outlines just a few of the contributing factors to why this significant event is taking place, the geographic/historic background of the state, and the consequences for the future of the region."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 18, 8:41 AM

If you haven't yet discovered John Boyer, a.k.a. the Plaid Avenger,  I recommend exploring his site.  He has numerous resources for world regional geography and current global affairs.  His colorful persona is highly entertaining for college age-students as his class attracts over 3,000 students each semester (you can decide for yourself whether that personality works for you and your classroom).  This particular 'plaidcast' discussion focuses on Iraq's current devolution and possible total collapse. 


Tags: SyriaIraq, MiddleEast, conflict, political, geopoliticsborders, colonialism, devolution.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 23, 12:27 PM

unit 4

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The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, June 2, 7:45 PM

Not really primary geography but so interesting!

Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

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Google Maps Displays Crimean Border Differently In Russia, U.S.

Google Maps Displays Crimean Border Differently In Russia, U.S. | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
In Russia, Google Maps now shows the Crimean Peninsula as part of Russian territory. The service shows a different image on browsers in the U.S.

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A Fascinating Visualization of World Migration

A Fascinating Visualization of World Migration | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Every year, millions of people leave their birth countries to try their fortunes in foreign lands. Where are the most popular destinations for these people? What countries are sending out streams of residents who may never come back?


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Craig Day's curator insight, May 22, 11:39 PM

Population Movements: Spatial and Temporal

Suvi Salo's curator insight, July 27, 11:08 AM

interactive version:

http://www.global-migration.info/

 

Mary Elizabeth's curator insight, August 31, 1:18 PM

another great visual focusing on migration is peoplemov.in

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The Difference Between Cultural Exchange and Cultural Appropriation

The Difference Between Cultural Exchange and Cultural Appropriation | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Where do we draw the line between "appropriate" forms of cultural exchange and more damaging patterns of cultural appropriation?

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Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 11:34 AM

Explains different ways of adapting and exchanging culture to others.

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The World of Starbucks, Mapped

The World of Starbucks, Mapped | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
No matter where you are on the planet, you're never more than 5,000 miles from a Starbucks.
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Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 29, 12:06 PM

Before reading this article, I knew that Starbucks was a big deal, especially in New York City but I wasn't sure about the rest of the world. Canada trails behind the United States with  China behind that. Mapping Starbucks locations allows people to see the spatial aspect of stores and to further understand why specific countries have so many Starbucks, be it an economic or social factor.

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Here's a map of top exports by state for 2013: Can you guess Alabama's main product?

Here's a map of top exports by state for 2013: Can you guess Alabama's main product? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The map includes a bar chart, showing which top exports appear most frequently. Aircraft is the top top export.
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Why Every Book About Africa Has the Same Cover

Why Every Book About Africa Has the Same Cover | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The 'post-colonialist and Orientalist' undertones of the ubiquitous acacia tree"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 14, 2:35 PM

I'm sharing this article with the idea that we all consider how we think about places and analyze the generalizations and stereotypes that might be embedded in our thinking.  No one can know everything about every place, and we create this mental constructs called regions to lump together bits of information to fill the gaps in our understanding.  Sometimes this serves us well, but often, we are fall for overused tropes.  


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"The Hatpin Peril" Terrorized Men Who Couldn't Handle the 20th-Century

"The Hatpin Peril" Terrorized Men Who Couldn't Handle the 20th-Century | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"[In the early 20th century] To protect themselves from unwanted advances, city women protected themselves with some sharp accessories.  For the first time, women who fought back against harassers were regarded as heroes rather than comic characters, as subjects rather than objects. Society was transitioning, slowly but surely, from expecting and advocating female dependence on men to recognizing their desire and ability to defend themselves."


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