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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder.

Via Seth Dixon
Molly Diallo's insight:

Would you try it? 

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 1, 2013 1:13 PM

I found this video to be very interesting. The video talks about Berlin's signature dish the currywurst. Currywurst is one of most well known dishes in Berlin, and is a dish the natives say every tourist should try. What was interesting to find was that the dish had elements from a few different places. Currywurst is made of pork sausage which and fried and cut into pieces. Pork suasage is a very widely used and popular meat that have in germany. However on the curry worst dish they put ketchup, which is very american like. They also sprinkle it with curry, which comes by way of India from Great Britian. It is amazing ti me that a country's signature dish has ingredients from two other countries! You would think that a signature dish would be made entirely of ingredients from their homeland. However the country is becoming more and more like other country adding sushi bars, soup kitchens, fast food, and etc. It just goes to show how much things have changed. Before country's were trying to use their own products as much as possible. Now we have such good transportation systems that people are moving to new places and food is being transported all over the world. Now we are at a point where even a country's signature dish uses products from many different country's. We have almost completely eliminated folk culture. It is almost sad in a way. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:03 PM

All over Germany specially in Berlin you can find many varieties of foods and restaurants that were influenced by many countries all over the world. A very popular dish the currywurst is fried German sausage with American ketchup and India curry powder. This dish was influenced by two other countries and was opular during WWII. The dish is still very popular today because of its unique taste. 

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:44 AM

This is a stride of different cultures,  a little ancient and modern culture. When the Turkish immigrant came over to Germany because they needed workers (Germans stopped having so many kids) it help form the curry wurst. They also use American ketchup because Americans were over there for the war and they ate this too. The curry powder came way of United Kingdom. Basically the population learned from all these cultures and  created one huge hit. 

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Factory Food From Above: Images of Industrial Farms

Factory Food From Above: Images of Industrial Farms | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Feedlots, a new series of images crafted by British artist Mishka Henner, uses publicly available satellite imagery to show the origins of mass-produced meat products."

 

Tags: Food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.  


Via Seth Dixon
Molly Diallo's insight:

Does this motivate you to become #vegetarian? 

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Angel Brian Gutierrez Gardeazabal's curator insight, September 29, 2013 5:17 PM

Ag-gag laws.... Nunca volvere a comer comida que no sea de mi linda Bolivia

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:19 AM

Some wild photgraphs about the devastation of mass aggriculture to the enviroment. Also their is a nice little bit about the laws behind why most people havent seen farming conditions till recent, such as some states preventing people to take pictures of their farms or factories without consent. If you are intreged by this article i suggest you watch FOOD Inc. This movie goes into great detail about how our food is made. But caution this may be one instance where igroance is Bliss because once you know exactly how your food is made you may never be able to eat some meats again. This movie can also be found on Netflix.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 11:35 AM

British artist Mishka Henner took photographs and enhanced the colors of feedlots to reveal the agribusiness of meat production. Photographs of feedlots are considered illegal and the legal repercussions of Mishka Henner are not clear at the moment, but the photographs are shocking and reveal again how little Americans know about their food production. 

Americans have changed the places and utilized them to build agribusiness empires and have introduced new problems to the landscape of feedlot and farming towns.

 

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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder.

Via Seth Dixon
Molly Diallo's insight:

Would you try it? 

more...
Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 1, 2013 1:13 PM

I found this video to be very interesting. The video talks about Berlin's signature dish the currywurst. Currywurst is one of most well known dishes in Berlin, and is a dish the natives say every tourist should try. What was interesting to find was that the dish had elements from a few different places. Currywurst is made of pork sausage which and fried and cut into pieces. Pork suasage is a very widely used and popular meat that have in germany. However on the curry worst dish they put ketchup, which is very american like. They also sprinkle it with curry, which comes by way of India from Great Britian. It is amazing ti me that a country's signature dish has ingredients from two other countries! You would think that a signature dish would be made entirely of ingredients from their homeland. However the country is becoming more and more like other country adding sushi bars, soup kitchens, fast food, and etc. It just goes to show how much things have changed. Before country's were trying to use their own products as much as possible. Now we have such good transportation systems that people are moving to new places and food is being transported all over the world. Now we are at a point where even a country's signature dish uses products from many different country's. We have almost completely eliminated folk culture. It is almost sad in a way. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:03 PM

All over Germany specially in Berlin you can find many varieties of foods and restaurants that were influenced by many countries all over the world. A very popular dish the currywurst is fried German sausage with American ketchup and India curry powder. This dish was influenced by two other countries and was opular during WWII. The dish is still very popular today because of its unique taste. 

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:44 AM

This is a stride of different cultures,  a little ancient and modern culture. When the Turkish immigrant came over to Germany because they needed workers (Germans stopped having so many kids) it help form the curry wurst. They also use American ketchup because Americans were over there for the war and they ate this too. The curry powder came way of United Kingdom. Basically the population learned from all these cultures and  created one huge hit. 

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The Great Nature Project

The Great Nature Project | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Join me and National Geographic's Great Nature Project in exploring the great nature all around us!

Via Seth Dixon
Molly Diallo's insight:

I am requesting you do this and send me a copy of your pictures as well!

 

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, September 27, 2013 10:37 PM

i agree with mary we should all get together and invite everyone we know

Tracy Klug's curator insight, September 30, 2013 3:07 PM

Join me in submitting pictures to National Geographic's Great Nature Project!  You could submit them to me personally so that I can show the images to my Human Geography students!

Janet Price's curator insight, October 1, 2013 6:41 PM

Something for that class set of cameras!

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Amazing and beautiful places on earth

ilentMost awesome places on earth to see, made by nature and people http://visit-travel-world.blogspot.com Sometimes a little out of the way or off the beaten tra...

Molly Diallo's insight:

Time for an adventure...... perhaps you would prefer to leave the club music on silent. : )

 

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The Top 50 'Pictures of the Day' for 2013

The Top 50 'Pictures of the Day' for 2013 | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
  At the end of every quarter the Sifter will highlight the top 25 'Pictures of the Day', culminating in an epic Top 100 at the end of the year (check out the 'Top 100 POTDs for 2012'). It's h...
Molly Diallo's insight:

Which photos of place are most inspiring to you?

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15 Surreal Landscapes Made from Food

15 Surreal Landscapes Made from Food | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
  Artist and photographer Carl Warner began his career in landscape and still photography, working many years in the advertising industry. Seeking new inspiration and direction one day, he hap...
Molly Diallo's insight:

Perhaps because I am hungry?  : )

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The Great Language Game

The Great Language Game | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Challenge yourself to identify some seventy languages by their sound alone. Learn more about how languages sound and where they're spoken.

Via Seth Dixon
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Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 2:21 PM
This certainly was interesting! It was challenging to identify some languages, and others you could figure out right away. Some of them I had never even heard of! Being exposed to a few languages growing up I thought I would be better at this, but I was very wrong. It is a little disappointing knowing that many people are not exposed to the many languages our world has to offer. It is also disheartening to hear many people get offended when people do not speak English here, when really America has no national dialect. I know that many schools require students to take a different language in high school, but it only the more common ones that are becoming popular in the U.S. (Spanish, French, Portuguese, etc.). Maybe some day children will become more exposed to the many different languages that have grown across the globe.
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 11:59 AM

A game where you can test your knowledge of global tongues only by sound.

The knowledge of languages is important in movement especially for migrants and immigrants and participators in global trade.

Debi Ray Kidd's curator insight, July 21, 4:52 PM

Make sure you look up the languages that you don't know to determine where they're spoken.

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3D relationships on 2D surfaces

3D relationships on 2D surfaces | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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espaciosalternativos's comment, September 11, 2013 1:27 PM
http://cargocollective.com/alvinaronson/Orange-Peel-Map
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 11, 2013 2:00 PM
Africa is often misrepresented see a good map here http://www.mapsofworld.com/africa/
Makenna Jordan's curator insight, September 13, 2013 4:07 AM

I think the idea of drawing a map on an orange is so clever because it really shows us that it's basuically impossible to take an image from a round spherical shape and transform it into the same exact thing on a 2D surface 

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The Authoritative Map


Via Seth Dixon
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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:26 PM

In the Winnie the Pooh Movie Pooh's Grand Adventure, the character Rabbit has absolute confidence in the printed word and especially the map.

 

Questions to ponder:  How much do we trust any given map?  How much should we trust a map (or the printed word)?  What makes a document reliable or unreliable? 

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, November 28, 2013 1:04 AM

The user is putting total trust in the map to get from A to B. How can we trust the map? What are the features of good infromation? A useful discussion-starter.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:38 AM

I think this video is a perfect example of todays modern soceity. Many people in this would today are exactly like rabbit, they believe everything they see without questioning its integrity. this has cause alot of problems in todays internet fueled world with anyone being able to post whatever they want and call it fact. This is where we need more people like Pooh who question everything. Pooh sees where he wants to go with his own eyes and can tell that rabbit is leading him the wrong way. This is relateable to so much in geography but to keep it simple ill compare it to Pythagoras proclaimed the earth was spherical. He question something everyone in the world took as a fact and nobody believed him because it was already stated that the world was flat. Just like pooh questioning the "offical map"

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The Top 100 'Pictures of the Day' for 2012

The Top 100 'Pictures of the Day' for 2012 | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
  After the positive reception from last year's Top 50 'Pictures of the Day' for 2011, the Sifter promised to highlight the top 25 'Pictures of the Day' at the end of every quarter, eventually...
Molly Diallo's insight:

Love these photos!  Check out the ones related to our course. 

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QuizMeGeo - Daily #world #geography quiz questions! Think you know a lot about #worldgeo? Want to learn more? Tweet me your answers! | Wisr

QuizMeGeo - Daily #world #geography quiz questions! Think you know a lot about #worldgeo? Want to learn more? Tweet me your answers! | Wisr | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Wisr teaches anything from Chemistry to Algebra through Twitter/chat/SMS/email. Learn by answering questions in the communication channel where you are most comfortable. (Which country is the geographical center of Southeast Asia?
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40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World

40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
  If you're a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and infographics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this c...
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Understanding Global Statistics

Understanding Global Statistics | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Infographics to explain global statistics."


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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, August 27, 2013 3:49 PM

Un conjunto de sencillas infografias para visualizar estadisticas de la humanidad en el tiempo presente

trampolinecalf's comment, September 27, 2013 2:46 AM
good one
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:11 PM

If the World was 100 People shows the statistics of the world as in smaller proportions allowing them to be easily visualized.

Some of the graphics divide the people into regions and nationalities mainly as Formal by continents .

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Directions and Dialects


Via Seth Dixon
Molly Diallo's insight:

Amusing : )

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 23, 2013 11:11 PM

Learning about North, South Carolina isn't easy; and don't get me started on Due West...throw in a different accent and you've got a failure to communicate (and for the record, she is dead on with her geographic descriptions).


Tags: language, the South.

Expert's comment, September 25, 2013 10:07 PM
hehe :)
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Popular Baby Name

Popular Baby Name | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"MAPS: Here's the Most Popular Baby Name in Each State. By Business Insider. |. Posted Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, at 2:15 PM."


Via Seth Dixon
Molly Diallo's insight:

Population..... all the babies being born...... popular girls' names!

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Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 30, 2013 11:05 AM

Very interesting way to look at which names have become popular and where. I never would have guessed that there would be such a difference between the north and south, the east and west, or the more populated states versus the larger in land. I guess place and space even effect how names are picked. It would be interesting to see the map for previous years and compare. I would also be curious to see the map of the year I was born. 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 27, 5:11 PM

There are so many options when it comes to naming your son or daughter. As years go by, trends can be seen in the naming process according to regions. Names that were popular in the early 90s are less popular as names such as Olivia, Ava, Liam and Mason begin to become the most popularist. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 11:41 AM

This chloropleth map shows the most popular female baby names of 2012 by state and can also reveal regional connections and the movement of common ideals. 

While the major regions of similarity (Mid-West and West Coast) of course are similar and show cultural connections, other states outside of these regions (yet have the same baby name) show connections that could have come from the movement of people and ideas from the other regions.

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Starbucks’ New Flavor Honors the Birthplace of Coffee, Ethiopia at Tadias Magazine

Starbucks’ New Flavor Honors the Birthplace of Coffee, Ethiopia at Tadias Magazine | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Ethiopian Business and Lifestyle
Molly Diallo's insight:

September 29th - National Coffee Day - Starbucks - ETHIOPIAN COFFEE

 

If you are a coffee lover, or just craving a geographic experience for your tastebuds, I expect you to take yourself to Starbucks and try a free sample on the 29th.  THEN.... you will take a picture and text it to me.  

Coffee was discovered in Africa more than 1,200 years ago, and Ethiopia has some of the best tasting coffee in the world.

 

#Africashoutout #Ethiopia #globalization #Starbucks #ethicallysourced 

#iloveaphuman #hashtagobsessed

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The 20 Poorest Countries in the World in 2013 -

The 20 Poorest Countries in the World in 2013 - | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
In the early 80′s, Bob Geldof of the band called The Boomtown Rats saw in the news the massive famine engulfing the African country of Ethiopia....
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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 11:48 AM

Though Geldof and the development of Live Aid tried to lessen the harsh conditions of certain African countries and other economically stunted states, these countries continue to stay among the "poorest" in the world.

Countries with economic issues come mainly from troubles with the post-colonialism era and their place of people and resources. Ethnic troubles and lack of resources or transportation methods keeps these countries in the Less Developed category.

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18 National Flags Made From Food

18 National Flags Made From Food | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
ITALY - Basil, pasta, tomatoes     These delicious flags were designed for the Sydney International Food Festival by the advertising agency WHYBINTBWA. It's a fantastic concept that creat...
Molly Diallo's insight:

Simply Awesome.

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Picture quiz – do you know your world cities?

Picture quiz – do you know your world cities? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Some city skylines are so iconic they are instantly recognisable.

Via Seth Dixon
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harish magan's comment, September 10, 2013 7:09 AM
It is very interesting to explore new cities and their sky views
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:41 PM

After taking this quiz I realized I could not really identify most of these cities. I could tell some of them were European from the look of the buildings. I also thought a few more were cities in the United States but there was only Dallas. In my opinion these cities are even more spectacular than some of our major cities. 

Lorettayoung's curator insight, May 8, 8:36 PM

is this ularu ?

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These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."


Via Seth Dixon
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Tom cockburn's comment, September 20, 2013 5:09 PM
Absolutely agree,Marian!
Amy Marques's curator insight, February 6, 5:09 PM

These maps are a great way to see what North American cities used to look like in comparison to what they are now. Some great transformations are Chicago and NYC.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 11:56 AM

The Smithsonian Magazine overlayed maps of American cities for the past centuries with modern satellite images to show differences in the development and planning and the growth of the cities.

The growth and change of the cities changed over the years on how it was achieved and how far it could be expanded due to new technology and movement of people to urban areas. The technology helped achieved a certain hold over the environment to build more urban spaces. 

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This Pittsburgh restaurant only serves food from America's "enemies"

This Pittsburgh restaurant only serves food from America's "enemies" | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Conflict Kitchen is the only restaurant in the world that serves cuisine solely from countries with which the U.S. is in conflict.

Via Seth Dixon
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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 3, 2013 4:26 PM

Any Ethnic conflicts here HUGGERS?

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:04 PM

Initially I wasn't really sure what I thought about this resturant. My initial reaction was that I hated it and thought it was a bad idea. I to seemed like we were supporting another country by serving their food. However there is a cultural experience involved when we go out to eat. Many people go out to italian resturants to get the experience of italy and etc. However after really thinking about it the US is typically in conflict with another countries government, not the people who live there. By selling the food of countries we are in conflict with almost gives us an idea about what exactly the culture is there. I think it almost educates people in such a way. I think that might be the purpose on the resturant. By eating at this resturant it opens peoples eyes to what people of that particular country are consuming on a regular day basis. That experience can be good or bad, but either way it still opens up peoples eyes to the type of world other countries are living in. I think by eating there you open yourslef up to a new cultural experience, which I belive is exactly the point that the kitchen is trying to serve. Even if it is through food. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:06 PM

Conflict Kitchen serves foods from the countries the United States is in conflict with. They might be doing this to show Americans a little bit of how their culture is b eating their foods. 

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The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island

The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"When viewed from above, a runoff of sand and silt creates the impression of an ‘underwater waterfall’, just off the coast of the island nation of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean."


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, September 26, 2013 11:19 AM

this look pretty nice i would like to go see it in person

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:36 PM

By looking at this picture you automatically think its a waterfall within the water. This image is actually just showing the mix of sand and silt deposits mixing together. The light to dark colors is what makes it look like a waterfall. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:24 PM

Another spectacular sight. Of course, you will need a plane or helicopter to venture above it to see it, but this illusion is pretty nifty.

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Linguistic Diversity at Home

Linguistic Diversity at Home | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Counties where at least 10 percent of people speak a language other than English at home."


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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 10, 2013 11:02 PM

This map does not bring many surprises.  Places where there are a lot of Spanish speaking families are present in places where many Spanish people immigrate to, along the Mexican border and the southern tip of Florida, where Cuba is close by.  One interesting thing about the French areas seen in Louisiana is that their version of French is a regional dialect. Not only is their a cluster of French speaking families, but they are all speaking a language native to the region.  It is very surprising that there are not as many French speaking families along the Canadien border.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, September 26, 11:34 AM

This map shows how linguistically diverse the United States is today. This map reminded me of one of the slides that we went over in class about how in the Northwest Region the predominant language was German and now it is mainly English, with some German and Native American languages still spoken in certain parts.

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 26, 10:29 PM

This data is very interesting because you can see that most of these statements speak Spanish. I noticed that most people who speak another language at home (in this case Spanish)  besides English are located in the south western of United States. I wonder if this has something to do with people who immigrated to U.S  from south America.

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Learning about the world through photography | TrekEarth

Learning about the world through photography | TrekEarth | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
TrekEarth is dedicated to fostering a global community interested in photography from around the world.

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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


Via Seth Dixon
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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:06 PM

The immense tree of world religions is presented as a graphic to tell connections of world religions and how far they've broken and changed.

The movement of ideas and people have helped caused these breaks in the religion by bringing ideas to new people, mixing with the present culture, and going further from the hearth of the religion.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2:08 PM

unit 3

CT Blake's curator insight, October 13, 9:15 AM

Gives students the idea of how complex the background of modern religions are.