AP Human Geography
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The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island

The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"When viewed from above, a runoff of sand and silt creates the impression of an ‘underwater waterfall’, just off the coast of the island nation of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean."


Via Seth Dixon
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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, September 26, 2013 11:19 AM

this look pretty nice i would like to go see it in person

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:36 PM

By looking at this picture you automatically think its a waterfall within the water. This image is actually just showing the mix of sand and silt deposits mixing together. The light to dark colors is what makes it look like a waterfall. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:24 PM

Another spectacular sight. Of course, you will need a plane or helicopter to venture above it to see it, but this illusion is pretty nifty.

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Drainage Patterns

Drainage Patterns | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The incredible fractal pattern rivers (now dried out) were made as they spread into the salt flats of the arid Baja California Desert in Mexico."


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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:22 PM

This picture shows the drainage patterns and how the water drifted in many directions and not just in a single line. Water does not stay in a perfect straight line it flows and drifts in many directions. This is what the image is showing, how this particular water flows in many directions and branches off from one stream to another. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 2014 10:46 AM

The Earth is an incredible place, we all know that. To see something like this form by itself is a wonder on its own.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:15 PM

The photographs of the salt flats in the Baja California Desert reveal dried out rivers that may have once fertilized the area to be able to sustain life.

Human-Environment Interaction speeds up desertification and makes once fertile lands useless.