AP Human Geography
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The Authoritative Map


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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:26 PM

In the Winnie the Pooh Movie Pooh's Grand Adventure, the character Rabbit has absolute confidence in the printed word and especially the map.

 

Questions to ponder:  How much do we trust any given map?  How much should we trust a map (or the printed word)?  What makes a document reliable or unreliable? 

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, November 28, 2013 1:04 AM

The user is putting total trust in the map to get from A to B. How can we trust the map? What are the features of good infromation? A useful discussion-starter.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:38 AM

I think this video is a perfect example of todays modern soceity. Many people in this would today are exactly like rabbit, they believe everything they see without questioning its integrity. this has cause alot of problems in todays internet fueled world with anyone being able to post whatever they want and call it fact. This is where we need more people like Pooh who question everything. Pooh sees where he wants to go with his own eyes and can tell that rabbit is leading him the wrong way. This is relateable to so much in geography but to keep it simple ill compare it to Pythagoras proclaimed the earth was spherical. He question something everyone in the world took as a fact and nobody believed him because it was already stated that the world was flat. Just like pooh questioning the "offical map"

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Linguistic Diversity at Home

Linguistic Diversity at Home | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Counties where at least 10 percent of people speak a language other than English at home."


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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 10, 2013 11:02 PM

This map does not bring many surprises.  Places where there are a lot of Spanish speaking families are present in places where many Spanish people immigrate to, along the Mexican border and the southern tip of Florida, where Cuba is close by.  One interesting thing about the French areas seen in Louisiana is that their version of French is a regional dialect. Not only is their a cluster of French speaking families, but they are all speaking a language native to the region.  It is very surprising that there are not as many French speaking families along the Canadien border.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, September 26, 2014 11:34 AM

This map shows how linguistically diverse the United States is today. This map reminded me of one of the slides that we went over in class about how in the Northwest Region the predominant language was German and now it is mainly English, with some German and Native American languages still spoken in certain parts.

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 26, 2014 10:29 PM

This data is very interesting because you can see that most of these statements speak Spanish. I noticed that most people who speak another language at home (in this case Spanish)  besides English are located in the south western of United States. I wonder if this has something to do with people who immigrated to U.S  from south America.

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The Longitude Problem

The Longitude Problem | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Romain ARMAND's comment, August 21, 2013 5:17 AM
Thank you for the video and fo the link to the Board of Longitude! Already know this story, but still amazing and well documented.
Richard Miles's curator insight, September 5, 2013 7:30 PM

Great video on how the problem of longitude was solved.

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 2014 3:57 AM

What was mapping and navigation like before the era of GPS?

Check out this great archive and collection of video clips! 

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These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 9, 2015 2:15 PM

Fantastic collection!

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, January 6, 2016 5:02 PM

Entre art et géographie...

Lindsay Hoyt's curator insight, June 26, 11:31 PM

Helps connects the past to the present.

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When Google Earth Goes Awry

When Google Earth Goes Awry | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"These jarring moments expose how Google Earth works, focusing our attention on the software. They reveal a new model of representation: not through indexical photographs but through automated data collection from a myriad of different sources constantly updated and endlessly combined to create a seamless illusion; Google Earth is a database disguised as a photographic representation. These uncanny images focus our attention on that process itself, and the network of algorithms, computers, storage systems, automated cameras, maps, pilots, engineers, photographers, surveyors and map-makers that generate them.”


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 23, 2013 11:06 AM

The quote above from Clement Valla shows some of the problems with trusting too completely in a form of technology if you are not sure how it works or what its limitations are.  What does he mean when he says "Google Earth is a database disguised as a photographic representation?"  What does this have to do with the term metadata?   


Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, art, google.

Mary Rack's curator insight, August 26, 2013 10:10 AM

This post represents a "sub-issue" which underlies many of today's  decisions: How much "information" is really a composite of items that may or may not be related? And how many of our decisions are based on those constructs? As a result, are we liviing in a "house of cards", a fantasy world that is sure to collapse around us one day? It's a scary thought. 

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 12, 2013 9:55 AM

I understand that this article mostly depicts the inherent limitations with our current technology within GIS systems but I mostly just found these images to be eerily and awkwardly beautiful. Art made accidentely. Thank-you flawed technology.