AP Human Geography
Follow
583 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Molly Diallo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Amy Marques's curator insight, February 6, 2014 5:09 PM

These maps are a great way to see what North American cities used to look like in comparison to what they are now. Some great transformations are Chicago and NYC.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:56 AM

The Smithsonian Magazine overlayed maps of American cities for the past centuries with modern satellite images to show differences in the development and planning and the growth of the cities.

The growth and change of the cities changed over the years on how it was achieved and how far it could be expanded due to new technology and movement of people to urban areas. The technology helped achieved a certain hold over the environment to build more urban spaces. 

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 9, 2:15 PM

Fantastic collection!

Rescooped by Molly Diallo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Longitude Problem

The Longitude Problem | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Romain ARMAND's comment, August 21, 2013 5:17 AM
Thank you for the video and fo the link to the Board of Longitude! Already know this story, but still amazing and well documented.
Richard Miles's curator insight, September 5, 2013 7:30 PM

Great video on how the problem of longitude was solved.

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 2014 3:57 AM

What was mapping and navigation like before the era of GPS?

Check out this great archive and collection of video clips! 

Rescooped by Molly Diallo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

When Google Earth Goes Awry

When Google Earth Goes Awry | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"These jarring moments expose how Google Earth works, focusing our attention on the software. They reveal a new model of representation: not through indexical photographs but through automated data collection from a myriad of different sources constantly updated and endlessly combined to create a seamless illusion; Google Earth is a database disguised as a photographic representation. These uncanny images focus our attention on that process itself, and the network of algorithms, computers, storage systems, automated cameras, maps, pilots, engineers, photographers, surveyors and map-makers that generate them.”


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 23, 2013 11:06 AM

The quote above from Clement Valla shows some of the problems with trusting too completely in a form of technology if you are not sure how it works or what its limitations are.  What does he mean when he says "Google Earth is a database disguised as a photographic representation?"  What does this have to do with the term metadata?   


Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, art, google.

Mary Rack's curator insight, August 26, 2013 10:10 AM

This post represents a "sub-issue" which underlies many of today's  decisions: How much "information" is really a composite of items that may or may not be related? And how many of our decisions are based on those constructs? As a result, are we liviing in a "house of cards", a fantasy world that is sure to collapse around us one day? It's a scary thought. 

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 12, 2013 9:55 AM

I understand that this article mostly depicts the inherent limitations with our current technology within GIS systems but I mostly just found these images to be eerily and awkwardly beautiful. Art made accidentely. Thank-you flawed technology.