AP Human Geography
39 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

TED Talk: The danger of a single story

http://www.ted.com Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authen...

 

To gain a global perspective inherently requires understanding multiple perspectives.  Africa is frequently portrayed as 'the other' but also homogenized within a single narrative that 'flattens' truth.  How do we teach about other places that develop geographic empathy and show the many stories of places?  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Religious Pilgrimage: the Hajj

Religious Pilgrimage: the Hajj | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

This is a beautiful photoessay of the Hajj, with excellent captions that shows many of the cultural customs that are associated with the massive pilgrimage.  The tremendous influx of tourists/pilgrims into the Mecca area, there is a huge economic industry that supports and depends on the tourists.  For a BBC article about the market impacts of the Hajj, see: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-11777483


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 11:21 PM
The photos show what an immense congregation this event really is. If a picture is worth a thoudsand words, than this collection is a jackpot. The colors are captivating, green costumes of participants in the military parade, the hands holding the beads for sale. In the article from bbc.co.uk it is interesting to learn that such a religious event is an opportunity for economic gains. From merchants selling beads and rugs to visitors all the way to hotels capitalizing on the religious pilgrimage. It is amazing to know that every Muslim should make this trip as long as he/she is healthy and can afford to.
Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 8:55 PM

These photo’s are amazing! Number 12 with the crowd of people and the ambulance in the middle shows the massive amount of people. Their heads look like dots in a sea of white. These pictures show what words just cannot describe. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:23 PM

One of the five pillars of Islam is the Hajj. A pilgrimage to mecca that has the byproduct of being economically prosperous. Every year droves of people flock to Mecca. Where they stay, what they eat, what they buy all pump money in the local economy. Although it was not meant to be an economic cash cow, the Hajj definatley provides businesses with an influx of money. This shows how religion definatley has economic repercussion and that all facets of geography are interconnected.

Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Nina Jablonski breaks the illusion of skin color

Nina Jablonski says that differing skin colors are simply our bodies' adaptation to varied climates and levels of UV exposure. Charles Darwin disagreed with ...

 

This insightful TED video explains the biological and geographic reasons for the evolution of skin pigmentations.  Nina Jablonski says that differing skin colors are simply our bodies' adaptation to varied climates and levels of UV exposure. See the TED-ED lessons for this video at: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/nina-jablonski-breaks-the-illusion-of-skin-color


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Fried Chicken In Ulan Bator: KFC To Open In Mongolia

Fried Chicken In Ulan Bator: KFC To Open In Mongolia | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Would you like home-style biscuits or mashed potatoes to go with your yurt?

No country is out of reach for global food brands these days, and

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 2013 1:59 PM

Globalization has a long reach indeed. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 10, 2013 11:53 AM

Diffusion....Globalization....transnational corporations Oh My!

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 7:14 PM

Cultural diffusion in action.

Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

An American Coach in London


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 7, 2013 2:11 PM

This is comedy sketch, but it is only funny because the cultural differences and rules between football and football (soccer and American football) are quite stark.  

Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

The Middle East, explained in one (sort of terrifying) chart

The Middle East, explained in one (sort of terrifying) chart | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"What could be simpler than the Middle East? A well-known Egyptian blogger who writes under the pseudonym The Big Pharaoh put together this chart laying out the region’s rivalries and alliances. He’s kindly granted me permission to post it, so that Americans might better understand the region. The joke is that it’s not a joke; this is actually pretty accurate."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
BandKids13-14's comment, August 28, 2013 9:50 AM
Did anyone else notice that both Al Qaeda and the U.S. are FOR syria rebels, and against Assad?
Avonna Swartz's curator insight, August 30, 2013 11:13 AM

Interesting and (as it says) terrifying.

Todd Parsons's curator insight, September 2, 2013 10:06 AM

So we should have peace in the Middle East in maybe 7.59 billion years when the sun goes all red giant and we all burn up anyway. However, in the meantime...check out this cool chart of friends and foes. It all makes sense now, yah?

Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Cultural Transmission

"Check out more of Lily's work at: http://shapeswemake.tumblr.com/ Lily Myers, performing for Wesleyan University at the 2013 College Unions Poetry Slam Invitations.  This was awarded Best Love Poem."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 30, 2013 4:43 PM

This is an emotionally evocative look at how gendered roles and norms are embedded in everyday social actions.  After watching this video ask yourself: How is 'culture' transmitted?  How is it received?  What elements of gender roles did I learn from my family without them overtly trying to teach them to me?  

Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

The Town that is Literally Living Under a Rock

The Town that is Literally Living Under a Rock | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"People choose to live in some pretty baffling places, like those towns sitting at the base of volcanos or the precariously placed monasteries in the Himalayan mountains. Here’s one that looks like it might have been hit by a meteor and residents just decided to carry on as usual…Welcome to the town of Setenil de las Bodegas in Spain, where around 3,000 inhabitants are living quite literally, under a rock."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
dilaycock's curator insight, April 8, 2014 6:38 PM

An extreme example of the built environment working with the natural one. I don't think, however, that I'd be able to sleep well with this very visible weight hanging over my head! 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 16, 2014 5:56 PM

these places are so beautiful! We forget how beautiful the natural environment really is.

Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Liberals Eat Here. Conservatives Eat There.

Liberals Eat Here. Conservatives Eat There. | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Can you tell a person's politics based on where they buy their groceries or hamburger? Here's one gauge of how liberal or conservative customers are at America's chain restaurants, fast-food establishments and supermarkets.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 2014 12:12 PM

Years ago before the whole "Marriage Equality vs. Chick-Fil-A" snafu, I was outside of Baltimore on a road trip.  As my family pulled of the interstate there were two options food options: Panera Bread and Chick-Fil-A.  My 3 kids couldn't care less about Foccacia, so I took them to Chick-Fil-A while me wife got something at Panera.  Although these establishment were adjacent to each other they occupied radically different social spaces and distinct ethnic networks and speculated that the political affiliations of customers would also be difference.  This observation is supported by the data in this article that shows that certain restaurants attract (cater to?) a clientele that is either more conservative or more liberal.    

Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Video: How do you pronounce ‘water?’

Video: How do you pronounce ‘water?’ | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
YouTube users across the United States have uploaded dozens of videos to demonstrate their local dialects. PostTV examined people’s accents and state-specific answers to an online list of common questions.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 2014 10:42 AM

unit 3, this is one of my favorite topics in class!

Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Global Parenting Habits That Haven't Caught On In The U.S.

Global Parenting Habits That Haven't Caught On In The U.S. | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

If there's one thing have in common with those , it's that they both show us just how varied parenting styles can be.

Argentine parents let their kids stay up until all hours; Japanese parents let 7-year-olds ride the subway by themselves; and Danish parents leave their kids sleeping in a stroller on the curb while they go inside to shop or eat.

Some might make American parents cringe, but others sure could use a close study. Vietnamese mothers, for instance, get their kids out of diapers by 9 months.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Population Density

"This talks about what population density is and why people live where they do."

 

Tags: population, density. 


Via Dean Haakenson, Seth Dixon
more...
Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, October 21, 2014 10:46 AM

Excellent short video defining and explaining population density. 

Catherine Pearce's curator insight, October 23, 2014 6:35 PM

A nice straight forward presentation

Bradley Hunkins's curator insight, October 28, 2014 2:55 PM

Why do people live in the locations they do and how can we impact our enviroment

Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The Sahel’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study.  Among the 22 countries making up the arid region in northern Africa, the population grew to 471 million in 2010 from 367 million in 2000, a jump of nearly 30%. As the population grew rapidly, the production of crops remained essentially unchanged.  Using satellite images to calculate annual crop production in the conflict-ridden Sahel belt, south of the Sahara desert, the researchers then compared output with population growth and food and fuel consumption."

 

Tags: Africa, Sahel, population, environment, water, ecology, environment depend, weather and climate, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 5:59 PM

with the strife in this region it is hardly surprising that it is hard to maintain food supplies in the face of large scale immigration. in a region where it is hard to survive, immigration would be a massive threat, straining already thinly spread resources.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:22 AM

If a country has a big population growth, the resources that it has if they are already scarce may become devastating. As the population of Sahel does increase, the amount of food resources will not have the proper time to react to the growth. Granted it may take a while for agricultural crops to grow and many citizens may face hard times facing finding food, but their hardships will be overcome by farmers trying to produce more crops to help ease that hardship.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:38 PM

this seems like an alarmingly common problem in the world today with population growth happening at an alarming rate in many parts of the world. most notably india and china. as well as in sahel, if your population grows by 100 million in 10 years it will be impossible to keep up and be able to provide for that many people in such a reletively short time.

Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Advertising's Image of Women

We are bombarded with advertisements that are cultural artifacts.  Within these artifacts they express ideas of normalcy, values, goals and appropriateness.  Any one image can be dismissed as an aberration, but the preponderance of evidence suggests that these images don't just reflect culture--media portrays shape culture and the cultural values being shaped aren't pretty. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Cheerleading goes native in India

Cheerleading goes native in India | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
In season five of cricket's Indian Premier League, the teams' Western-style cheerleaders are taking on a decidedly Indian look, reports Shamik Bag.

 

What happens when westernized cheerleading arrives in India's massively popular cricket sporting events?  After a backlash against the cheerleaders, they culturally reinvented the practice and made it their own, in a fusion of global and traditional cultural practices. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Hijab: A Different Definition of Freedom

Hijab: A Different Definition of Freedom | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Hijab: A Different Definition of Freedom http://t.co/WzAFA5Fv...

 

The meaning you ascribe to a cultural artifact is inherently based on your cultural perceptions and values.  While many in the West perceive the hijab to be a symbol of male hegemonic power and female oppression.  In this article that defends the Hijab, it is presented as a distinct form of female liberation.


Via Mr. David Burton, Seth Dixon
more...
Khanh Fleshman's curator insight, December 5, 2013 3:21 PM

This is on my page because it offers a different perspective to how clothing affects gender equality. It shows how the women in these societies don't see their restrictive clothing requirements as holding them back, but rather as empowering them. They instead feel that people can appreciate them for their brains and personality rather than body. People that could  benefit from reading this article are any Westerners that feel sorry for these women because of the way ther are required to dress. It gives the perspective of the women in these societies. This relates to Half the Sky because the book also has a section about how the women in these societies actually feel sorry for the women in our societies that have to change their bodies and clothing to please men, and how they are angry when people feel bad for them.

Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

The Cultural Construction of Beauty

TED Talks Cameron Russell admits she won “a genetic lottery”: she's tall, pretty and an underwear model. But don't judge her by her looks.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nikolas M's comment, February 1, 2013 1:44 PM
ouff finaly!
Fabrizio Bartoli's curator insight, July 25, 2013 4:15 AM

Deep and interesting speech to work with...

Renuka de Silva's curator insight, August 30, 2013 2:45 PM

A new beginning for my social justice centered classroom – a great point for discussion and student engagement. Thank you.

Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Germany Fights Population Drop

Germany Fights Population Drop | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
As German towns work to hide the emptiness, demographers say a similar fate awaits other European countries, with frightening implications for the economy.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 17, 2013 8:55 PM

Yes, identity!

Holly Hough's curator insight, December 8, 2013 3:35 PM

Germany is undergoing a population crisis. The population is plunging due to a high number of elderly people (the dependency ratio is 1:4) and the desire of women to be in the workforce. As a result, the women are not having children. There is a large number of young people who have obtained educations, but are unable to find work, which makes them less likely to want to have kids and start a family. This is a push factor for them to immigrate to another country where they can find work. This leaves Germany with higher dependency ratios and pushes them further towards economic crisis. Germany and many other European countries are offering incentives to women to have children, such as 24 hour child care, tax breaks, and money for married couples. Some fear fertility rates have fallen below replacement level. Just what will Germany do, “part of the solution lies in remaking values, customs and attitudes in a country that has a troubled history with accepting immigrants.” Germany will have to work to pull immigrants to their country to regenerate their population. Who knows where Germany will be 50 years from now?

Sarah Ziolkowski's curator insight, December 31, 2013 11:05 AM

This article applies to how values and preferences impacts an area. For Germany, their low birth rates are being caused by highly valuing  single mothers and discouraging immigrants to stay in their country.  These  unfavorable birth rates may be a future for many other highly developed countries, or already are a part of many countries. This could happen to your home, so your values or preferences may be come a problem to the economy. Low birth rates and unwelcomed immigration are causing decreased work force and increased demand in Germany, that they can't fulfill. It also causes an uneven population between the young and old population. 

Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Superimposed Borders

Sir Archibald Mapsalot III solves regional tensions in the Middle East.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Joy Kinley's curator insight, September 9, 2013 10:31 AM

What we think of as permanent countries were often created as part of the colonial past.  Boundaries were done for the benefit of the former colonizer not for the new country and this legacy still causes problems today.

Mrs. B's curator insight, October 5, 2013 9:40 AM

Mapsalot. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:07 PM

unit 4

Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

First World Problems Read By Third World Kids

First World Problems Read By Third World Kids | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A new ad campaign from charitable organization Water is Life features Haitian children and adults reading the everyday gripes and minor irritations first world citizens post on Twitter with the popular #FirstWorldProblems hashtag.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 18, 2013 11:51 AM

In addition to this video, also look at the "Skeptical Third World Kid" photogallery at the bottom as you think about development and the uneasy cultural issues of power that are connected with it. 


Michaela Schumacher's curator insight, December 20, 2013 11:56 AM

This article talks about culture and the aspect of globlization and how the first world countries are worried about something that is so far beyond what is really need that they forget what means the most. This is a video showing people that we take things for granted just becuase we have everything handed to us. That in the third world countries there is bigger worries that are way more important than not having a charger or things of that kind. It is relevent to me becuase i went to Haiti and saw the third world country with my own eyes and know that every word said on the video and every picture are real and that isn't just a studio createing things but real pictures of a world we would have never thought was there. 

Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

China on course to become 'world's most Christian nation' within 15 years

China on course to become 'world's most Christian nation' within 15 years | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The number of Christians in Communist China is growing so steadily that it by 2030 it could have more churchgoers than America

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, April 28, 2014 3:48 PM

Religion...

Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 29, 2014 2:27 PM

Another example of how one thing can begin in one region, go to another, then another, and then find a new identity as its previous one fades away. As part of what can be said to be a "devlopment" cycle, as a nation goes past manufacturing and into the services sector as well as its populace becoming more secular, the leaders of the church still need to bring in wealth for their coffers. What the missionarys started under colonialism is perhaps starting to pay off. Culture travels just as traded commodities does, by having peoples from different places inter-mingle and the largest motivator of that is global trade bringing people that ordinarily would not have met, together. Or in some cases, bible toting missionaries attempting to "civilize" a "primitive" people. If Jesus doesnt work, there is always opium.. again.

Linda Rutledge Hudson's curator insight, May 13, 2014 4:07 PM

It's interesting to think there are those who believe crime will diminish because there are more Christians.  I guess that's an infusion of Confucian morality and hope into their Christian ideals.  I hope that this will pave a way for the growth of human rights and more political freedom for China.

 

Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Cultural Identity

Cultural Identity | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Two women from different parts of the world, showing allegiance with a gun, flag and holy book http://pic.twitter.com/NgjUOhcEOz ;


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 7, 2014 2:53 PM

This juxtapostion is fascinating...

How are they the same? How are they different?  How does your own cultural identity impact how you judge these two images? 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:05 PM

APHG-U3

Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, March 17, 2015 1:15 AM

Both of these women feel a strong connection to their cultural identity, which to many would seem very different, with one being American western values and the other being Islamic values, but truly they are not so far apart. Both of the religious books the women have are from Abrahamic religions, very closely related in both message and content, and both women are expressing their pride for their country, and their willingness and desire to stand for that right. While many westerners may very well identify one of these women as a "terrorist" and the other as a "patriot", truly, they are not so different.

Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

This Chart Explains Every Culture In The World

This Chart Explains Every Culture In The World | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
As countries become more developed, they travel diagonally to the upper-right.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:49 PM

APHG-U3

David Week's curator insight, August 12, 2014 11:12 PM

This is possibly the worst chart in the world!

(a) you can't cluster cultures like this, you lose what matters: Geertz's thick (vs thin) description;

(b) the idea that Protestant Europe or English Speaking cultures value "self expression" vs "survival values" has never been inside a corporate workspace where many people spend many of their lives, or surveyed the incomes of artists in these countries.


(c) Secularity and rationality are also traditions, going back hundreds or even thousands of years.

(d) The idea that as cultures develop, the move towards Protestant Europe is the silliest, most blatantly ethnocentric statement I've seen in a long time.

Let's hope that people are not being trained using this BS.  

Jane Haggis's curator insight, August 18, 2014 2:43 AM

silly

 

Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Today’s key fact: you are probably wrong about almost everything

Today’s key fact: you are probably wrong about almost everything | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Most people around the world are pretty bad when it comes to knowing the numbers behind the news. But how issues such as immigration are perceived can shape political opinion and promote misconceptions

Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by matthew kellogg from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Literary United States: A Map of the Best Book for Every State

The Literary United States: A Map of the Best Book for Every State | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Two weeks ago, we published a literary map of Brooklyn, highlighting the books we felt best represented the neighborhoods in which they were set. Compiling the list of books for that map had us thinking about what it means for a story to not just be from a place, but also of it, and why it is that some places have an abundance of literary riches (we’re looking at you, American South), while others, well, don’t. There are those stories that so beautifully evoke a time and a place and a way of life that it becomes close to impossible to separate the literary perception of a place from its reality—one winds up informing the other.  All [books on this states list] are literary in voice and spirit; every last one will let you understand a time and place in a more profound way than you maybe thought possible.


Tags: English.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
BI Media Specialists's curator insight, October 27, 2014 10:03 AM

This looks neat! How many of these books have you read?