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The Human Imprint

The Human Imprint | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A Human Geography Resource; Especially for Teachers

 

The Human Imprint is home to everything Human Geography related for the student, educator, and the every day Joe/Jane. This site includes geographic related stories, lesson plans, and other links that bring us closer to understanding the “why of where.”


Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 2014 7:58 AM

Words leading to new Geography treads.

good for up to date articles.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 6:54 PM

Unit 1

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:15 PM

course resource

Rescooped by Michelle VanGaasbeck from AP Human Geography
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How a dialect differs from a language

How a dialect differs from a language | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
HONG KONG'S education department caused a furore last month by briefly posting on its website the claim that Cantonese was “not an official language” of...

Via Ms. Amanda Fairchild
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Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5? Maybe so! | Newgeography.com

Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5? Maybe so! | Newgeography.com | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Eighty-two years after the original development of the four stage Demographic Transition Model (DTM) by the late demographer Warren Thompson (1887-1973), the cracks are starting to show on the model that for many years revolutionised how we think about the geography of our global population.


Via Mr. David Burton, Christopher L. Story
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Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:33 PM

In my opinion, I do not think that the world could be approaching stage 5. I'm not sure if the world as a whole will ever reach stage 5. Our population is increasing and even though birth rates are low I still think that stage 4 is where we will be stuck. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, March 25, 2015 6:52 PM

This article discusses the demographic transition model, mostly Stage 5. Stage 5 is still slightly an unknown thing, because many people argue whether there are any countries in that phase or not. Stage 5 is characterized with very low birth rates, low death rates, lots of family oriented planning, and a slow decrease in population. Some people argue Germany is already in this stage, but I don't really agree. 

I think we should focus more on the developing countries that are stuck in stage 2. 

USA is in stage 4, and I believe that we will be stuck here for a while before advancing to stage 5. 

This is a good article for people that are interested in this unit to read, it gives a new perspective on things. 

Flo Cuadra Scrofft's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:44 AM

Summary- With his Demographic Transition Model, Warren Thompson suggested that we are in the midst of a transition shown by stage 4, in which birth rates are equaling death rates. But if we analyze the demography in the present day, we will find that we are already past that stage. Most countries in the world are now entering or already in stage 5, in which birth rates are lower than death rates, making it very difficult, if not impossible for the population to grow. These current trends have led to an increased empowerment of women in western countries, since less babies mean more working hours, and more profits. It has also allowed for inter-generational relationships within families, where a children is able to meet his grandparents and even his great grandparents. In Europe, the birth rate is currently below the replacement level. The only way Europe has been able to increase or at least maintain its population is through waves of immigration.

 

Insight- it's is incredible that we are taught that we are experiencing the fourth stage of the Demographic Transition model, and that stage 5 talks about the future. What we may have not noticed is that many countries of the world are already part of that future; they have started to be part of this stage without us realizing it. I really liked the prediction made in the last paragraph. The fertility increase in more developed countries can take us to a new stage 6 in Thompson's model.

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Some meals on offer in McDonald's abroad may come as asurprise

Some meals on offer in McDonald's abroad may come as asurprise | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

“ Don’t be fooled into thinking that a meal in McDonald's when you're on holiday is going to be the same as at home. Different countries have their own additions, designed to appeal to local tastes.”


Via Suvi Salo, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks, Christopher L. Story
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In Divided Belgium, Sons of Immigrants Bring Unity on the Soccer Field

In Divided Belgium, Sons of Immigrants Bring Unity on the Soccer Field | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
In Belgium, a small European nation struggling with ethnic rivalries, the national soccer team has put to one side the political and linguistic differences that have crippled society.

Via Jan Servaes
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Hunger Games: Map of Panem

Hunger Games: Map of Panem | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

As a former children's librarian, this is the perfect merger of some of my interests.  The Hunger Games, a Young Adult dystopian novel (movie coming soon) takes place in a post-WWIII North America with 13 districts noted for particular resources.  For example, district 4 specialized in fishing and district 12's economy centered on coal.  For middle schools that teach integrate units with social studies and English, this would be a very engaging, current connection. 


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl, Christopher L. Story
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picky's comment, March 21, 2012 5:40 PM
Phoenix, AZ, at 1100ft above present sea level, is shown underwater. Cincinnati, OH, at 900ft above present sea level, is shown still above water. This map makes no sense. Using a Panem map for teaching geology is a great idea, but don't use it to reinforce the false idea that "farther inland" means "higher."
Seth Dixon's comment, March 21, 2012 7:57 PM
Certainly this isn't a geologically accurate map (just like Waterworld was a fictitious world that couldn't exist). Yet in the book Hunger Games, there are elements of North American geography that are a part of this fictitious geography, even if it is not expected to be geographically accurate. Your point is most certainly well taken that further inland does not mean higher elevation.
Danielle Lip's curator insight, January 26, 2015 4:39 PM

This map of the Hunger Games location can help a young adult to make connections to the world we live in and with a movie/book that many children and adults adore. The districts all have different specialities and are spread out on a United States Map, I as a student would have the opportunity to see that where I live today would not be part of the districts post WWIII. This map could start a debate and discussion about English ( the book ) as well as Social Studies( the map) making connections to the world we live in today. Another way that this map can help children to learn is to place an actual map over the Panem map to help children become intrigued and see what could happen if there was a WWIII.

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48 iPad Apps for Teaching and Learning Geography / Earth Science

48 iPad Apps for Teaching and Learning Geography / Earth Science | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

“ After a year or two of tinkering and experimenting with apps for teaching / learning Geography, I have (finally) compiled this list of what I deem to be the most useful iPad apps for teaching Geogr...”


Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School, Steve Perkins, Christopher L. Story
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Understanding Population Pyramids

“ This covers what a population pyramid is, and how to analyze one. It covers the three basic shapes and how they correspond to population growth or decline. Fina”


Via Steve Perkins, Christopher L. Story
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