AP Human Geography
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What Country in the World Best Fits Your Personality?

What Country in the World Best Fits Your Personality? | AP Human  Geography | Scoop.it
This quiz will determine which country in the world best reflects your personality and living style. It is where you will thrive in life the most. Plan your next vacation there, or make the big move!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 10, 2014 2:39 PM

Not academically rigorous obviously, but this is just for fun.  I think I was channeling my inner-hobbit since I got New Zealand. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 18, 2014 11:39 AM

ummmmm.... FUN?????

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's comment, September 5, 2014 9:54 AM
Funny, I got New Zealand as well.
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Why South African whites are coming home

Why South African whites are coming home | AP Human  Geography | Scoop.it

"Hundreds of thousands of whites left South Africa following the ANC's landslide election victory in 1994. Twenty years on, the exodus shows signs of slowing, even reversing. Jane Flanagan spoke to some of those who have returned."

 

The exodus has steadily slowed however and there is evidence that many of those that left - whether for careers, over safety fears or political instability - are returning. Homecoming Revolution estimates that some 340,000 have come home in the last decade.

The idea that the "pale male" is not welcome in the South Africa, in the wake of a widespread implementation of affirmative action, is misplaced, Ms Jones says.

There is "no shortage" of opportunities for returning skilled professionals with international experience, particularly in finance and IT, she says.  But settling back into life in South Africa often takes time and some cannot put aside their original motivations for going. Around one in six returnees end up leaving again.


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The ethics of photographing locals

The ethics of photographing locals | AP Human  Geography | Scoop.it

Too often I see tourists rush in to villages, and even homes, reaching for their cameras without attempting to make any connection with the people they are so anxious to photograph. Often this is without the permission of those they are photographing, or when those people are clearly uncomfortable.

I find this strange, and question the intent of tourists in these circumstances. What value is a photo of someone whose name you don’t know, a stranger with whom you haven’t had a conversation? Their culture, clothing and home may look different to yours. But what does that mean if you haven’t built any rapport with that person? When you look at their photo years from now, what will you remember about them and the interaction you had?


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China on course to become 'world's most Christian nation' within 15 years

China on course to become 'world's most Christian nation' within 15 years | AP Human  Geography | Scoop.it
The number of Christians in Communist China is growing so steadily that it by 2030 it could have more churchgoers than America

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, April 28, 2014 3:48 PM

Religion...

Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 29, 2014 2:27 PM

Another example of how one thing can begin in one region, go to another, then another, and then find a new identity as its previous one fades away. As part of what can be said to be a "devlopment" cycle, as a nation goes past manufacturing and into the services sector as well as its populace becoming more secular, the leaders of the church still need to bring in wealth for their coffers. What the missionarys started under colonialism is perhaps starting to pay off. Culture travels just as traded commodities does, by having peoples from different places inter-mingle and the largest motivator of that is global trade bringing people that ordinarily would not have met, together. Or in some cases, bible toting missionaries attempting to "civilize" a "primitive" people. If Jesus doesnt work, there is always opium.. again.

Linda Rutledge Hudson's curator insight, May 13, 2014 4:07 PM

It's interesting to think there are those who believe crime will diminish because there are more Christians.  I guess that's an infusion of Confucian morality and hope into their Christian ideals.  I hope that this will pave a way for the growth of human rights and more political freedom for China.

 

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Heartbreaking Photos of Children Who Are Risking Everything to Reach the United States

Heartbreaking Photos of Children Who Are Risking Everything to Reach the United States | AP Human  Geography | Scoop.it
Michelle Frankfurter tells the stories of these young migrants and also those of the thousands who jump aboard “the death train”

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The Town that is Literally Living Under a Rock

The Town that is Literally Living Under a Rock | AP Human  Geography | Scoop.it

"People choose to live in some pretty baffling places, like those towns sitting at the base of volcanos or the precariously placed monasteries in the Himalayan mountains. Here’s one that looks like it might have been hit by a meteor and residents just decided to carry on as usual…Welcome to the town of Setenil de las Bodegas in Spain, where around 3,000 inhabitants are living quite literally, under a rock."


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dilaycock's curator insight, April 8, 2014 6:38 PM

An extreme example of the built environment working with the natural one. I don't think, however, that I'd be able to sleep well with this very visible weight hanging over my head! 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 16, 2014 5:56 PM

these places are so beautiful! We forget how beautiful the natural environment really is.

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NAFTA an empty basket for farmers in southern Mexico

NAFTA an empty basket for farmers in southern Mexico | AP Human  Geography | Scoop.it

"When the agreement between the United States, Mexico and Canada went into effect in 1994, it removed nearly all trade barriers between the countries. Among the industries affected was agriculture, forcing small Mexican farmers into direct competition with big American agribusiness. Cheap American corn – heavily subsidized, mechanized and genetically modified – soon flooded the Mexican market to the detriment of local farmers.  As U.S. farmers exported their subsidized corn to Mexico, local producer prices plummeted and small farmers could no longer earn enough to live on."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 2014 9:06 AM

International trade agreements are usually discussed at the national level.  "NAFTA benefits Mexico" is a commonly heard saying because trade with the United States and Canada strengthens the manufacturing sector in Mexico.  Even if there is an overall benefit to a country, there are always winners and losers for different regions, economic sectors and many other demographic groups.   Farmers in southern Mexico were certainly a sector that struggled mightily under NAFTA.


Tags: Mexicosupranationalism, industry, place, agriculture, food production,

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:44 AM

The American agricultural industry has been highly subsidized by the government to create interest in farming and food production. This causes problems for America's neighboring countries' resident farmers. The Mexican corn farmers are struggling mightily with the influx of cheap American corn into Mexico due to the open trade policies created by NAFTA. Some tariffs or new economic regulations must be created to protect Mexican corn farmers and regulate the amount of cheap American corn that is flooding Mexican markets. 

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 29, 2014 12:44 PM

With all the good we thought NAFTA did for the three countries involved, I feel that sometimes we overlook the bad.  Southern Mexico has felt all negative affects from NAFTA.  While the northern states in Mexico are able to keep up with the advanced agricultural processes that America has, the south is unable to.  The old techniques and lack of machinery prevents the south from having any possible competition with the north as well as America leaving the south to become extremely impoverished and potentially unsuitable for any living.

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Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years

"About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations."


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steve smith's curator insight, June 7, 2014 9:01 PM

A great look at urbanisation. 

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 8, 2014 9:48 AM

تاريخ التطور الحضري

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, June 14, 2014 7:18 PM

Fabulous link between Geography and History

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40 maps that explain food in America

40 maps that explain food in America | AP Human  Geography | Scoop.it

"The future of the nations will depend on the manner of how they feed themselves, wrote the French epicurean Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin in 1826. Almost 200 years later, how nations feed themselves has gotten a lot more complicated. That’s particularly true in the US, where food insecurity coexists with an obesity crisis, where fast food is everywhere and farmer’s markets are spreading, where foodies have never had more power and McDonald’s has never had more locations, and where the possibility of a barbecue-based civil war is always near. So here are 40 maps, charts, and graphs that show where our food comes from and how we eat it, with some drinking thrown in for good measure."


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Treathyl Fox's curator insight, June 26, 2014 12:26 PM

WOW!  Talk about contrast and compare.  So now is contrast, compare and ... uh? ... conquer??  From farming and enjoying the harvest - which could be interpreted as healthy eating back in the day - TO sugary sweet soda pops and fatty burgers - which some might be calling junk food, convenience food, fast food, comfort food you don't have to cook yourself, the cause of obesity, a politician's guide to a potential source of additional revenue from taxes, etc.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:16 PM

With more people than ever living in cities and less people than ever working on farms, the future of our food is in question. The riskiness, labor, low gain,  and negative stereotypes of farmers combined with the fear of food conglomerates has led to a depletion of smaller scale farmers. Brain drain in rural farming areas is depleting the number of younger people willing to work in agriculture. With most of our food production being controlled and overseen by large corporations, people are now questioning the quality of our foods. Recently, the local food movement is educating people on the importance of food produced with integrity and supporting  local businesses.  

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:51 PM

Occasionally these lists that say something like "40 maps that..." end up being an odd assortment of trivia that is interesting but not very instructive.  Not so with this list that has carefully curated these maps and graphs in a sequential order that will enrich students' understanding of food production and consumption in the United States.  Additionally, here are some maps and chart to understand agriculture and food in Canada

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, locavore, agribusiness, USA

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The Internet Is Obsessed With Maps — Here's Why It's Gone Too Far

The Internet Is Obsessed With Maps — Here's Why It's Gone Too Far | AP Human  Geography | Scoop.it
And it needs to stop.

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Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:20 PM

If this is the only way to get people interested in thinking geographically, then I think it shouldn't stop.However, if we were to work and improve the geographic thinking of US citizens, it would probably be best to map these topics on a global scale rather than simply emphasizing the well known geography of the US. With that said, Americans obsession with mapping "trivial" topics does inspire an interest in geography. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 18, 2014 11:40 AM

unit 1 bad bad maps

Mary Elizabeth's curator insight, August 31, 2014 1:16 PM

nothing makes kids pay attention like food

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10 Fastest Emerging Global Cities

10 Fastest Emerging Global Cities | AP Human  Geography | Scoop.it

Cities in lower-income countries are rapidly catching up with the world's top business capitals, according to a new report.


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In Pictures: Nomads of the sea

In Pictures: Nomads of the sea | AP Human  Geography | Scoop.it
The Bajau people live on their boats in the coral-rich ocean between Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines.

 

"From my grandfather to my grandchildren, we all live on the boat. We don't have gods, so my grandfather is like a god to me. He said I cannot stay on land. It's like a curse from him," says Bungsali, an older man who does not know his exact age. 

Bungsali is one of the Bajau Laut, also known as sea gypsies - an indigenous ethnic group who have a seaborne lifestyle. They originally come from the Philippines' Sulu Archipelago, coastal areas of Mindanao and northern Borneo. But they roam freely throughout the so-called "Coral Triangle" between Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines, living on their boats. The ocean is their home, their main source of food and income and, for the children, their playground.

In Malaysia's eastern Sabah state, the Bajau are believed to be the second-largest ethnic group. However, their exact numbers are unknown. 

But fewer and fewer Bajau Laut still practise a boat-based lifestyle. Many have moved to live in small stilt houses built on coral reefs or on small islands. One hundred years ago, the waters off Malaysia's Semporna district were full of gypsy boats. But now, only a few remain. In the near future, there might not be any Bajau Laut left living on the boats, only legends and stories will be all that remain.


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10 All-American Foods That Foreigners Can't Stand

10 All-American Foods That Foreigners Can't Stand | AP Human  Geography | Scoop.it
Red velvet cake does not sit well with many foreigners. They dislike it because it is packed with chemicals and food coloring. Many think that is tastes bland and that the only flavor coming through is the artificial coloring taste. They would much prefer a true chocolate or vanilla cake.

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Joy Kinley's curator insight, April 3, 2014 10:19 AM

Culture determines what food that you eat.  American foods are a blend of different cultures as well as convenience products.  The convenience foods are full of different chemicals and perservatives that alter the flavor of foods. 

Even for foods that we think would taste the same like chocolate there is a large difference in taste.  I agree that some of the things like grits or biscuits and gravy would seem odd if you hadn't grown up with them.  Red Velvet Cake (the only part I like about it is the Cream Cheese Icing) has a chemcial taste as does the cheese products, such as cheese in a can.

However just as foreigners don't like some American foods some foreign foods taste equally strange to Americans, even things that seem that they would taste the same such as soft drinks in other countries. 

However Peanut Butter and Jelly is wonderful (it is difficult to find peanut butter in many countries) but I agree that European chocolate is much tastier.

Mr. David Burton's comment, April 5, 2014 7:55 PM
But I oh so love everything on this list ... pfff :-)
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 2014 10:45 AM

unit 3 & Unit 5

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The Changing Face Of America's Chinatowns

For centuries, people from China have immigrated to major cities in the United States. There, many formed their own neighborhoods known today as Chinatowns. But with China's economy booming and the U.S.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 7, 2014 9:14 AM

Nothing stays the same...some nostalgically mourn the loss of what once was, but the cultural fabric of an individual neighborhood continues to get reshaped but successive waves of national migration and global restructuring. 

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Urban Fruit Farms: Effort underway to create a "healthier Milwaukee" - fox6now.com

Urban Fruit Farms: Effort underway to create a "healthier Milwaukee" - fox6now.com | AP Human  Geography | Scoop.it
Urban Fruit Farms: Effort underway to create a "healthier Milwaukee" fox6now.com “We really want to get residents involved from the design phase of what will the Urban Fruit Farm look like, to help plant the trees, to help maintain the trees, and...
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The white tourist’s burden

The white tourist’s burden | AP Human  Geography | Scoop.it

"Growing Western demand for altruistic vacations is feeding the white-savior industrial complex.  Volunteerism presents an escape, a rare encounter with an authenticity sorely missed, hardship palpably and physically felt – for a small price."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 2014 6:02 PM

As stated in this article, "Under this program, well-to-do tourists sign up to build schools, clean and restore riverbanks, ring birds and act as caregivers to AIDS orphans for a few weeks. This led to the creation of a profitable industry catering to volunteer tourists. The orphans’ conditions are effectively transformed into a boutique package in which 'saving' them yields profits from tourists. The foreigners’ ability to pay for the privilege of volunteering crowds out local workers."  For a satirical look at this type of tourism, the Onion absolutely delivers.  

Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 29, 2014 2:22 PM

Why not take advantage of "I feel guilty because Im doing exponentially better than them?" or the less politically correct term - "white guilt." Arguably this can be seen as the "those that have" feeling guilty and thinking that by volunteering for a few weeks will make them feel better about their rampant consumerism. As the article points out though, this is not a problem solver. You can build homes for people but without giving them a foundation(and education) in how to take "proper" care of themselves, as well as the proper infrastructure to support them, they will continue to beg, or be unable to find work(if there is any) that will give them the security they need to support the house given to them, or take care of any well water that has been established, etc, etc. Unfortunately, many of the volunteers who pay to volunteer do not want to fix the bigger picture but instead want to get a small taste of it so that they can talk about it over cocktails or use their Kodak moment for a new Facebook default.

Tracey M Benson's curator insight, May 5, 2014 5:59 PM
I have heard from people working long term with schools and orphanages the short term volunteer culture causes more harm than good.Seth Dixon sums this article up:

As stated in this article, "Under this program, well-to-do tourists sign up to build schools, clean and restore riverbanks, ring birds and act as caregivers to AIDS orphans for a few weeks. This led to the creation of a profitable industry catering to volunteer tourists. The orphans’ conditions are effectively transformed into a boutique package in which 'saving' them yields profits from tourists. The foreigners’ ability to pay for the privilege of volunteering crowds out local workers."  For a satirical look at this type of tourism, the Onion absolutely delivers.  

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China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers

China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers | AP Human  Geography | Scoop.it
In China's Second Continent, Howard French explores the Chinese presence in 15 African countries. The relationship goes beyond economics: more than a million Chinese citizens have migrated to Africa.

 

He says there's a debate about the long-term consequences of China's push into the African continent: Will it create development and prosperity, or will it lead to exploitation reminiscent of 19th-century European colonialism?


Tags: Africa, development, China, industry, economic, podcast.


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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:40 AM

Is good that China decided to make business outside of its territories. With this plan, they are helping they own economic, but also improving other people lives with the airport and highway.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:05 PM

Though the age of European Imperialism has long since ended, China is beginning to realize the benefits involved with economic expansion into other countries. "More than a million Chinese citizens have permanently moved to Africa, buying land, starting businesses and settling among local populations." Many are worried that this push into Africa could lead to extreme exploitation and disparity among native Africans while China solely benefits. If you compare this scenario with what is occurring in Myanmar and other parts of Southeast Asia, it would seem that China is there specifically for its own benefit. 

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 5, 2015 1:47 PM

Only the Chinese would see a potential market in Africa...

However, in all seriousness I too see the potential market. The continent is huge. The population is ridiculous and it is only going to keep growing. A population of this magnitude needs goods to live. In turn, China will provide for this demand. However it is blatant that the market (African people) will be exploited at whatever cost. The manufacturing, selling, etc. is being done, according to this article, by Chinese people. These people left China in search of money and perhaps even a place to settle down. China is expanding to Africa so a lot of Chinese people are going to move to Africa for employment. China wins by increasing its economic output and losing its dead weight. By dead weight I mean the chinese citizens whom stem from lower middle class. These people were struggling in China. China could not produce jobs for them. These people then follow the money to Africa and once there "job" is done decide to stay and live in Africa. As stated by the article this is an independent decision being made. I understand that and I recognize it as not being an immediate concern.

What concerns me is the exploitation of natural resources as well as the exploitation of the African market. China will produce goods that they know will be sold in Africa- they will design everything to meet Africa's wants and needs, thus taking there money. An African business will not benefit from this commerce rather a Chinese firm, with Chinese workers. One can argue its business and I suppose it truly  is. China see's a continent that they can invest in. There country will benefit from it as well as its people, whom are finding jobs abroad and continue to work abroad due to the affluent economy. The Chinese see African people as "demand" and they want to "supply" for that never ending demand. 

The article mentions/compares this situation to colonialism. It certainly does seem like a form of exploitation in which the foreign investors make money off of the African people and the regions resources however it is being done in a business like fashion. This could be seen as the more modern form of colonialism. It's not a direct rule over a territory and people rather its a business venture. But couldn't the business venture be seen as a front? 

What's interesting is how China is very much taking a hands off approach in the local politics. They aren't getting immersed in the government rather they see themselves as business people operating in another country...for China's benefit. They aren't there to provide goods for the African people out of the goodness of there heart rather they just want to sell the goods that they know will sell to the massive population. China is setting up shop in a non-democratic way, in which they don't care about the society rather they just care about the financial benefit. The political standing of the country does not bother China. Also, this could be seen as China thinking long term. Instead of thinking democratically and "more fair like" China can focus more on its own business and people and not have to worry about crisis in the country as a whole. 

More than a million Chinese have emigrated to the continent of Africa to start business'. More Chinese will travel to Africa...chain migration... they will develop and make money off of the African market. Chinese will elevate there status in Africa off of the backs of natural resources (in Africa) as well as make money from the African market. A market that will be exploited-whether good or bad- exploited non the less. 

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Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | AP Human  Geography | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:26 PM

\I guess it's true what they say; a picture is worth a thousand words. Before even opening this article, you could get a sense from the picture that it wasn't going to be a good one. You can tell by their facial expressions and the environment that surrounds them. Even the colors that are portrayed in the picture send off meaning. The picture is not very bright. It sends off a sad image with all the brown everywhere. However, we do see a little peek of sunlight shining through. Before reading this, one might see this as a good sign from God, or someone watching over these people. Once I opened the article, there were many more pictures describing their lifestyles. You can tell that they don't make much money by the way they live. There was another picture in the article with a dark tint to it, representing a negative atmosphere, including one girl folding her arms and one girl with tears running down her face . There are no pictures were everyone in the images have smiles on their faces.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:18 PM

These picture paint a very sad and very real truth. Many of the people in the pictures are caring for children and barely have enough to make it through the day. One woman works long hours for about 50 cents a day and that is horrible, another woman is 40 years old and works at a construction site, which is obviously not the norm. These people, mainly the children, have hope of going to school, but for most of them that is just a dream that will never come true.

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From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century | AP Human  Geography | Scoop.it
Today's volume of immigrants, in some ways, is a return to America’s past.

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 4, 2015 6:56 PM

This article was very interesting to look at. I had knowledge that the majority of the immigrant population came from Mexico but it gave a different perspective to see it on a map. The one aspect that caught my attention was how the map of the United States looked like in 1910. The majority of the immigrants back then came from Europe, mainly Germany. Germany was the top country birth among U.S. immigrants because it was very dominating. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 5, 2015 2:12 PM

Many people in 2015 feel that immigration-reform is an absolute must for America.  They usually use words like, "illegal", "terrorists", or "welfare-recipients" to try and scare the rest of the country into thinking immigration has spiraled out of control.  Immigration definitely has a different make-up from a hundred years ago, but that doesn't equate to it being a problem.

 

An article like this puts much into perspective.  What most naive and ignorant immigration-reformers might not now before reading this article is that the proportion of our current population has a fewer percentage of immigrants than back in 1910.  This fact is totally opposite from the picture that some critics try to draw, essentially, comparing immigration to millions of fire-ants invading our country.

 

Most immigrants now come from Latin America, whereas, in 1910 they came from Germany.  By reading the article, common sense will tell you that there might be more of a "racism" problem than an "immigration" problem in America.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, September 16, 2015 1:03 PM

Its interesting to me how the primary source of immigrants only shifts from Germany to Mexico in the 1990's, as opposed to when the country was cut in half in the fifties or during WWII. I had always thought that those events would limit German immigration more, however it appears that the primary reason for the shift is more due to the recent (relatively) drug war which erupted in Mexico.

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How languages evolve - Alex Gendler

How languages evolve - Alex Gendler | AP Human  Geography | Scoop.it
Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 30, 2014 2:58 PM

unit 3

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 18, 2014 11:29 AM

unit 3

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 4:15 PM

Showing the evolution of world languages. Tthousands of languages have developed over time and in this video he talk about the birthplace of diffent languagafes based on their different region, and culture patterns. 

thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number.