AP Human Geography
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AP Human Geography Review Material


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its almost here! Don't' forget the list of resources on our course calendar too!
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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, May 7, 2015 10:42 AM

This is worth your while to look at HUGGERS!

Joy Kinley's curator insight, May 7, 2015 11:34 AM

For those of you needing AP Human Geography review this is a good one.

Michael Martin's curator insight, May 9, 2015 6:36 PM

Hey students:  Check out this Prezi for REVIEW. Yay!

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100 Resilient Cities

100 Resilient Cities | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Helping cities around the world become more resilient to the physical, social and economic challenges that are a growing part of the 21st century.
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unit 7

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The World's Ten Largest Megacities

The World's Ten Largest Megacities | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The world is rapidly becoming urban. More than half the world's 7-plus billion people live in urban areas (urban cores, suburbs and small towns)....
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unit 7

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The Individual and the Global

"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." --Maragret Mead


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final word :)

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 3:55 PM

I love the notion and sometimes agree with this idea.  But at the same time it has to be sustained by the people.  It's this exciting idea to be a part of something, but that wears off quickly for a lot of people.  Then they are on to the next thing.  It would be nice if everyone would pick one cause and stay with it for atleast a year.  Maybe make this your New Years Resolution instead of hitting the gym.  

SNMinc WebGems's curator insight, May 8, 2015 5:16 AM

The unique power of one...

Avery Liardon's curator insight, May 20, 2015 10:43 AM

Very intriguing way to summarize the world and wrap up human geography. Reminds me of the pale blue dot speech, and really captures the big idea of how people and geography shape the world we live in.

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An earthquake felt across South Asia

An earthquake felt across South Asia | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The magnitude-7.8 earthquake that struck Nepal on Saturday morning destroyed parts of Kathmandu, trapped many people under rubble and killed more than 2,500 people. It was the worst to hit the country since a massive 1934 temblor killed more than 8,000."


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Map 8

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Joshua Mason's curator insight, April 29, 2015 11:04 AM

It's absolutely devastating what happened to Nepal. Any loss of life is a tragedy but loss of this scale is unimaginable. It's going to be a difficult rebuilding process for the Nepalese whether that's coping with the loss or physically rebuilding the nation.

 

Watching footage of shakes, what struck me the most was hundreds of year old temples crumbling. Those just aren't something you can easily rebuild. The building can eventually be replaced but the significance of it is almost lost. 

 

Those temples, like the homes in the area, were most likely not built up to a standard that could withstand earthquakes or at least earthquakes of this magnitude. It's easy to see how destruction on this scale can occur in large urban populations that were not designed to stand against such a dramatic event.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 3:59 PM

I've experienced earthquakes more times than I've ever felt the need.  We used to get them all the time it seemed in Japan.  My bed would role across the room.  It got to the point where I just slept through them.  If I had even felt a shake half as violent as what Nepal went through I could not even imagine the fright.  I wonder how long the India and Eurasia tectonic plates will stay on top of each other?  Or if a few more earth quakes will split the area?  

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 1:52 AM

Australian Curriculum

The causes, impacts and responses to a geomorphological hazard (ACHGK053)


GeoWorld 8

Chapter 4: Hazards: causes, impacts and responses

(4.5 - 4.6 Earthquakes)

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HB 3428 Factsheet-031015.pdf

HB 3428 Factsheet-031015.pdf | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
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Please encourage your parents to contact your state HR and Senators, this would be huge for you and all of our AP students- stop the "brain drain" flashcard term alert :) In short, if passed the new law would require state universities in Illinois to give credit for any AP exam score 3 or above, a policy already in place in 14 states!

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Nigerian opposition candidate leads in election as governing party cries foul

Nigerian opposition candidate leads in election as governing party cries foul | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Ex-dictator Muhammadu Buhari is more than 2m votes ahead but some voices in ruling PDP raise doubts over whether party would accept defeat
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Unit 4
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How does the United Nations work?

"Ever curious about the reaches of the United Nation and what they do? Here's a great video featuring Dr. Binoy Kampmark from RMIT University.  This short video can help improve your understanding of the UN, including its role in world politics and policy making."


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unit 4

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Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 8:47 PM

Unit 4

This video explains what goes on at United Nations meetings. 193 people gather in New York to discuss matters of peace and security. Established in 1945 made up of 50 countries and made to prevent another World War. The UN deals with matters of economics social policy, human rights, and culture. And the most important parts is the security council (made up of France, Britain, the United States, China, and Russia) and the general assembly. 

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:01 PM

Just a nice brief summary or how the United nations worked for political geography 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:47 AM

The UN is one of the most impact organizations we have today. The UN is a powerful peacekeeping supranational organization organized to help all nations and countries

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The shocking differences in basic body language around the world

The shocking differences in basic body language around the world | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The body speaks volumes. But what it says depends on the culture you're in.


Tags: culture, infographic, worldwide.


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unit 3

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Gaëlle Solal's curator insight, April 1, 2015 12:58 PM

ça vous en bouche un coin?!

 

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, April 14, 2015 6:00 PM

This shows the costums that several other Countries use in north America we cross our legs but in Countries Like Asia disrespectful. In America we view blowing or Noise is normal in Japan that Considered rude

Roman M's curator insight, April 16, 2015 12:17 PM

This article shows the different customs on gestures or body language in the world. What we might do is disrespectful in another country. For example, even some as simple as crossing your legs while sitting is common in North America and some European countries. However, it is viewed disrespectful in Asia and the Middle East.

RM

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A Japanese restaurant is selling KitKat sandwiches

A Japanese restaurant is selling KitKat sandwiches | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
KitKat sandwiches are officially a thing, and apparently they're delicious
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Unit 3, far from the strangest menu item I've seen come out of the region, but it always makes me ask why do we have the unhealthiest reputation again?  Japan has 15 different flavors of the kit kat bar alone :)

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Who would have guessed that Lincoln Park was seeing population loss?

Who would have guessed that Lincoln Park was seeing population loss? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Chicago's affluent North Side has lost a lot of people. That's a problem for businesses, residents of moderate means and anyone who would like to move there but can't afford to.
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 7 Sometimes "trendy" can be a problem! 

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You Won't Believe How Much Sprawl Costs America

You Won't Believe How Much Sprawl Costs America | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
More than $1 trillion, according to a new report.

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unit 7

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Quiz on the Differences Between Sunni and Shia Islam

Quiz on the Differences Between Sunni and Shia Islam | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Most of the world's major religions are made up of multiple sects or denominations, and Islam is no different. Islam's two major sects are the Sunnis and the Shiites, and the division and interplay between the two is a major factor in the geopolitics of the Middle East. How well do you understand Sunni and Shiite Islam? Take our quiz and find out!

Via Seth Dixon
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unit 3

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 6, 2015 10:19 PM

After taking this class about Political Islam I thought I knew about Sunni and Shiite Islam.  Taking this quiz I definitely mixed up a lot of the information.  It seems like it would be simple to understand the differences and the similarities, but they are so parallel its easy to get the information mixed up.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 21, 2015 3:09 PM

"Muslim Extremists!" "Death to militant Islam!" "Muslims are terrorists!" These cries are often heard from conservative factions of the United States, who are a lot more eager to blindly hate than they are to learn about the lives of the same people they want dead. Islam encompasses some 1.3 billion believers, and there are significant deviations in both the faith and its application among such a wide population of believers. Before this exam, I knew about the Sunni majority and the Shia minority currently in conflict in the Middle East, but my understanding of the distinction between the two faiths was vague at best. I also did not recognize that each of the two main branches are then further split into different denominations, much in the same way that Christianity is today within our own country. As different and "other" we try and make the Middle East out to be, they are not that different in their religious practices (and their fanatics ruining the name of the religion for everyone else) than many conservatives would like them to be. I definitely enjoyed taking this exam, particularly within the context of everything I have been learning about with what is happening in Syria. I had no idea Assad was not just a regular Shia, but instead a member of a much smaller, stricter denomination. Learning about this region has definitely been an eye-opening experience for me, in the sense that I know a lot less about the world than I thought I knew.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 4:53 PM

I am not very educated on the religion but I do know from my notes in class that religion is what stops Iraq from unifying. That country is made up of three religions Muslims , Sunnis and Shiites.

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'Vision for Division' planning takes award

'Vision for Division' planning takes award | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Plainfield's innovative online initiative that seeks residential input for plotting the future of Division Street, also known as Illinois Route 59, near downtown, was honored last week.
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unit 7 and right next door to Joliet :)

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Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:04 PM

Summary: This article talked about the addition of a new main route through the middle of a small town in Illinois. It mostly discussed the challenges that came with it, mostly how the town would become less walkable, and less community and neighborhood friendly. A solution to this problem was posed by condensing the size of the road, while it will still help with the traffic problems, it would still be safe to walk, as well as more of a community town.

 

Insight: In this small city, they tried to deal with the contemporary urban issues of a city spreading out too much, as well preventing everything from looking the same, and preventing a crime increase. With this, it prevents the city from becoming too large and losing its character to become like every other city that the route goes through. 

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Pruitt-Igoe: the troubled high-rise that came to define urban America – a history of cities in 50 buildings, day 21

Pruitt-Igoe: the troubled high-rise that came to define urban America – a history of cities in 50 buildings, day 21 | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
From its fanfare opening in 1954 to its live-TV demolition three decades later, the St Louis public housing project remains a powerful symbol of the social, racial and architectural tensions that dogged America’s cities in the mid-20th century
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unit 7

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How We Built the Ghettos

How We Built the Ghettos | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A brief introduction to America's long history of racist housing policy.
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unit 7

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These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore

These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
How vacant houses trace the boundaries of Baltimore's black neighborhoods.

 

The map on the left shows one very tiny dot for each person living in Baltimore. White people are blue dots, blacks are green, Asians are red and Hispanics yellow.The map on the right shows the locations of Baltimore City's 15,928 vacant buildings. Slide between the two maps and you'll immediately notice that the wedge of white Baltimore, jutting down from the Northwest to the city center, is largely free of vacant buildings. But in the black neighborhoods on either side, empty buildings are endemic.


Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, economic, race, poverty, spatial, housing.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 7

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, April 29, 2015 7:00 PM

Inequality 

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, May 24, 2015 9:14 PM

Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use

 

This article is about Sandtown, Baltimore and its shift into a disamenity sector. It explains how this neighborhood, mainly housed by blacks, had a high percentage of vacant houses. The article says that this neighborhood is overrun with poverty, war on drugs and gangs and has the more residents in jail than any other neighborhood. This shows the changing demographics of the city of Baltimore.

 

This relates to unit 7 because it covers the topic of disamenity sectors and changing demographics. It shows reasons for the high levels of poverty and abandoned housing. It also shows the racial spatial distribution of the neighborhood and its correlation to housing and development.  

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 1:46 AM

This article left me heart broken. The African American community in Baltimore is stuck in a deep poverty cycle, and it cannot seem to escape its impoverished past. Even now, the poverty in the area seems to just be getting worse. The problems of income disparity lead to more problems than just economic; they lead to social and political problems. Social unrest and injustice occurs as a result of the modern white flight. This article arose as a result of the death of Freddie Gray, whose death demonstrates a significant social issue that needs to be addressed: police brutality and the criminal targeting of the African American community. His death stems from the tremendously amounts of disparity in the city. Promoting investment in the inner city would definitely help alleviate the poverty in the area. The problem is getting people to invest.

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It wasn’t just the Armenians: The other 20th century massacres we ignore

It wasn’t just the Armenians: The other 20th century massacres we ignore | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Last week marked the 100th anniversary of the killings of more than a million Armenians during the dying days of the Ottoman Empire. Despite considerable opposition from the Turkish government, the anniversary is bringing renewed attention to an often overlooked historical issue, with President Obama in particular facing criticism for not using the word 'genocide' to describe the killings. The 20th century was bloody and violent, and while some horrors are at least relatively well-known – the Holocaust or the genocides in Rwanda and Cambodia, for example – others have become mere footnotes in history."

 

Tags:  genocide, political, conflict, war, refugees, empire, colonialism, historical.


Via Seth Dixon
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units 2,and four :(

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Padriag John-David Mahoney's curator insight, April 28, 2015 6:18 PM

I have often thought about this. The Armenian genocide was the first genocide of the 20th century, but was largely forgotten. Very few- VERY FEW- American students learn about it before college or high school. What do we learn about? The only genocide I remember being taught in school was the Holocaust- the Jewish Genocide at the hands of Nazi Germany. But there was also the genocide and apartheid in Rwanda and the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia. My father taught me all about all of these genocides. There is a statue outside Auschwitz concentration camp with the inscription "Never Again". But what have the many organizations done to prevent or reveal such atrocities? I don't see the Shoah foundation standing up for the Armenians now, or the victims of the Cambodian or Rwandan genocides. I believe the inscription on that statue truly means ''Never again.........to the Jews''

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The History of a City Underfoot

The History of a City Underfoot | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
You never need to ask New Yorkers where they’re going. They’re already there.
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unit 7

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Nigeria elections: Mapping a nation divided

Nigeria elections: Mapping a nation divided | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Nigeria is Africa's biggest oil producer and most populous country - but many of its people are impoverished and the country is in the grip of a violent uprising by Islamists Boko Haram.
Courtney Barrowman's insight:
Units 3 & 6-note the regional disparities, unit 4-what will the impending election bring?
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A bird's-eye view of war-torn Syria

A bird's-eye view of war-torn Syria | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A school that lays in ruins, hospitals and refugee camps under attack, and a city center with the size of Manhattan destroyed by shelling — these are some of the shocking details of a new United Nations report on the conflict in Syria, four years after in began.


Tags: Syria, MiddleEast, conflict, political, remote sensing.


Via Seth Dixon
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unit 4

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Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:57 AM

Due to the current terror war in Syria, it has caused many people to flee to surrounding countries or countries where there is no terror and discrimination. This has caused them to be refugees or internally displaced persons.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 4:42 PM

The stupidity of this whole thing is the reparations and its cost. Its the injury and death tolls during the conflicts followed by the high cost to rebuild. One must ask is the war or conflicts worth it.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 7:20 PM

from the air the war looks like many historical photographs of bombings, and in this age of precision warfare it is somewhat disturbing that warfare can still look like this. this is a destruction of infrastructure on a scale unseen in the middle east since the Iran-Iraq war.

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Roam the World in (Almost) Real Time

Roam the World in (Almost) Real Time | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A groundbreaking Mapbox project ushers in a new era for online cartography.

 

On Google Earth, the seasons rarely change. Most anywhere a digital traveler goes, the sky is cloudless and the grass is green. No snow on the ground in Iowa. No fire in Valparaiso. It's a big gap between the world as it is and as it's mapped.

Launched Thursday,a landmark project from Mapbox has changed the summertime paradigm for online cartography. Landsat-live reveals the planet's surface in real time and in stunning resolution, fed by a constant stream of public-domain imagery from NASA’s Landsat 8 satellite.


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unit 1

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Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 2015 12:47 PM

In this article we are shown the development and evolution of cartography. We can observe the changing geography on the planet and the real time gives us an accurate reading. I feel like this innovation could greatly help us.

YEC Geo's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:59 AM

This sounds really cool.

 

UPDATE:  I've had a chance to look at this. 

 

Cool things:  great images.

 

Not so cool:  It's not a substitute for Google Earth.   You can only pan out or in to a limited degree, so to go from Texas to Timbuctoo, for example, would take a lot of clicking and dragging.  Best way to get to a place is to type it in the search box.  No 3-D view also. And if there are a lot of clouds when the image was taken, they'll obscure the landscape.

 

That being said, if you want to see large-scale, recent images of a particular place, it's a good site. 

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 2015 4:34 PM

Summary: This interesting article talks a lot about modern technologies effect on the popularity of geography. This article talks about how programs like Google Earth have caused a general interest to arise about physical geography.

 

Insight: This article is significant to unit 1 because it shows how GIS can be so influential to not only geographers but to the rest of society.

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Cartographically Inspired Fashion

Cartographically Inspired Fashion | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

I found this on pinterest (where else?) and decided to share the geographically inspired craftiness:

1. Paint your nails white/cream
2. Soak nails in alcohol for five minutes
3. Press nails to map and hold
4. Paint with clear protectant immediately after it dries.

This also works with newspaper, but don't try it with NatGeo Maps because the paper is of too high a quality to have the ink bleed out; I would recommend using an old USGS Topo map. 

 

Tags: fun, art.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

I heart maps!  I cant wait for spring break to try this :)

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Mrs. B's curator insight, March 25, 2015 8:13 AM

Yes to map fashion! I saw a woman with a map skirt - so cool. MAPSMAPSMAPS!!!

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Orthodox Jews in central Ohio toss old hot plates after tragic N.Y. fire

Orthodox Jews in central Ohio toss old hot plates after tragic N.Y. fire | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Some members of the Jewish community in central Ohio are tossing old appliances after seven Orthodox Jewish children died in a Brooklyn, N.Y., fire caused by a malfunctioning electric hot plate used to keep food warm during the Sabbath.
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 3, many have been questioning how long is too long before truly reconsidering a longstanding cultural tradition. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 2015 11:50 AM

These deaths were so unnecessary, both from religious and a technological safety standpoints.  I do honor their desire to maintain religious purity and hope that everyone can finding a safe manner to do so; I think this will serve as a huge wake-up call to reconsider some traditions, or the interpretations thereof. 


All religions and folk cultures today are all searching for ways to maintain their most values tradition in a midst of a modernized, secular world that might often scorns them as backwards.  Most religions developed customs in a different technological and cultural context and finding how to do so is a balancing act...this was one of the over-arching themes of the classic film Fiddler on the Roof; Tevye, an observant Russian Jew searches for the core values behind his most prized traditions and seeks to keep observing them and his daughters continually push the limits of tradition.

Courtney Barrowman's comment, March 25, 2015 12:36 PM
I like the way you pointed out the balancing act of finding a way to keep the most valuable traditions in a modern technological and cultural context. Thanks for your input-
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Redrawing the map of Europe

"Fantasy cartography: An animated redrawing of the map of Europe.
Imagine a world in which countries could move as easily as people. A suggestion for a rearranged Europe."


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unit 1

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Gabby cotton's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:49 AM

Unit 4: Political organization and space

This short video analyzes European countries and their relations and tries to reorganize accordingly, the grouping categories seem to be relations, languages, and Ethnic groups.

 

This relates to human geography because it talks about how different countries and ethnic groups get along and try to find the best possible solution to ensure the comfort of all involved nations. It talks about re-arranging borders and population density. 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, March 24, 2015 2:01 AM

Unit 1

Summary

This video shows countries being able to move easily in order for each countries benefit. Many countries are moved away from their enemies or other feared countries. Also in this idealistic video countries that are landlocked are able to move to places with easier access to water. It also includes moving countries and territories to be near countries that would work well together.

Insight

This personifies countries as moving as they please, literally. I found this a little funny and pretty interesting to see what countries would do if they could daily move. It really reveals the importance of location and geography for countries in that countries are stuck where they are for the most part ad can't just move away from their enemies of conditions. 

Aleena Reyes's curator insight, May 6, 2015 11:53 PM

A very interesting and fun short video. It raises a lot of questions has to how this could be done (if it could) and how one creates borders and regions.