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World map: Where people feel they live good lives

World map: Where people feel they live good lives | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A new Gallup report charts "global states of mind."
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How Ebola sped out of control

How Ebola sped out of control | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The story behind the failure of the world's health organizations to stop the Ebola disaster.

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unit 1

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Bibhya Sharma's curator insight, October 7, 2014 1:32 AM

is enough commitment shown by the developed countries, I dont think so.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 7, 2014 4:24 AM

How Ebola sped out of control

Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, January 12, 10:18 AM

The development between MDCs and LDCs are very different in a lot of ways. The Ebola epidemic is handled in two different ways because of the levels of development in countries. in MDCs there is more of a health indutry and can cure sicknesses much faster than those countries of less development. 

I.C.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ebola easier to stop now than later

Help must come within weeks, or Ebola will require unimaginable resources. Data sources: http://nej.md/1wS4zeN & http://reliefweb.int/disaster/ep-2014-000041...

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unit 1 diffusion!

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 2014 5:41 AM

Ebola easier to stop now than later

Michael Mazo's curator insight, October 6, 2014 2:54 PM

Ebola has been a growing concern for some time now. With its origin in Africa to its spreading throughout the world, people have become increasingly worried about contracting Ebola. With the initial diagnosis of the first patient infected with Ebola in the US, the CDC has been working constantly to prevent further spread of this infectious disease. Not only has this raised medical concerns, but as soon as the Ebola outbreak has entered the United States Biotechnology stocks began to rise. With the help of devices and programs stemming from Biotechnology there is great hope for eradicating the disease once and for all. Even healthcare workers are hesitant upon working with infected individuals, so hopefully biotech will enter with a grand entrance by providing materials or machinery to help prevent these workers from getting Ebola.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, October 16, 2014 11:46 AM

Although Ebola is a disease that can be stopped now, different measures need to be taken now. With the vaccines that were administered to the Ebola aid workers that were working in the site of the outbreak, mass production of that vaccine should be created and made available to those who are believed to be infected with this parasite.

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50 Years Ago, A Fluid Border Made The U.S. 1 Square Mile Smaller

50 Years Ago, A Fluid Border Made The U.S. 1 Square Mile Smaller | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Since Texas became a state, the Rio Grande has marked the border between the U.S. and Mexico. But, like rivers do, it moved. In 1964, the U.S. finally gave back 437 acres of land.

 

Ever since Texas became a state, the river has been the border between the two countries. But rivers can move — and that's exactly what happened in 1864, when torrential rains caused it to jump its banks and go south. Suddenly the border was in a different place, and Texas had gained 700 acres of land called the Chamizal (pronounced chah-mee-ZAHL), so named for a type of plant that grew there.

 

Tags: Mexico, migration, borders, political, place, podcast.   


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Sharon's curator insight, October 2, 2014 11:02 AM

Pair with Power of Place video Boundaries and Borderlands -- Cuidad Juarez and El Paso.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 4, 2014 1:12 PM

This article highlights one of the problems of tying political boundaries to the physical environment. When the Rio Grande moved further south it was in the United States' favor, and they happily accepted the extra land, despite the complaints of Mexico. It wasn't until 100 years later when the US feared the potential of Mexico straying during the Cold War that they decided to handle the issue. This shows some of the issues that can arise when placing rigid political definitions on the fluid and changing landscape.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 5, 2:15 PM

This article is highly interesting because it shows just how "obnoxious" the concept of a border (a man made concept) actually is.  I found it interesting that the border could move that much due to the Rio Grande flooding.  It seems to me that it was a hasty decision on the part of the politicians who set the Rio Grande as the border between the United States and Mexico.  I also found it interesting that how in the 1960's, the United States forced people out of their homes when they were going to cede the land back to Mexico.  Because it was part of an effort to keep them allied with the US during the Cold War.  Also, it was highly interesting how the US built a cement casing around the river to keep it from moving.  Like Trillo says at the end of the article, "There's only so much control a man can do on a river. Sooner or later...the river is gonna do what Mother Nature has taught it to do — to move."

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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 2013 10:02 AM

This interactive on refugees is especially timely, given that the Syrian civil war has created refugee situations in many of the neighboring countries.  One of my favorite elements of the Guardian's interactive is that they provide the raw data, so students can create their own maps with the same high quality data.  Equally important, this interactive shows the regional power bases of all the various factions of the Syrian rebellion that is seeking to overthrow the Assad regime.  The political conflict has huge demographic implications.    

Tags: refugees, Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:25 AM

via gduboz

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13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world

13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The transition from childhood to adulthood -- the 'coming of age' of boys who become young men and girls who become young women -- is a significant stepping stone in everyone’s life. But the age at which this happens, and how a child celebrates their rite of passage into adolescence, depends entirely on where they live and what culture they grow up in.  Looking back, we'll never forget the majesty that was prom, or the excitement of hitting the dance floor at our friends' co-ed Bar and Bat Mitzvah parties, and why should we? Embarassing or amazing, they were pivotal moments in our lives that deserve remembering. On that note, here are thirteen of it the world’s most diverse coming of age traditions."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, culture, indigenous, worldwide.


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Unit 3

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, September 29, 2014 5:04 PM

Love seeing the many different traditions that people do when coming of age and also traditions in general. Growing up living in the United States my family still followed the many traditions they had where they came from. Both my parents are from Colombia and they brought down many of there family traditions and also world wide Spanish traditions also. For example, my sweet 15 was a very memorable tradition that many young Spanish girls have once they turn 15. Its a big celebration and festivities that are all very much traditional for us. Its interesting learning the traditions others have and learning about new places.

Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, October 3, 2014 3:07 AM
Its interesting to see the different cultural traditions that are set at different stages in a persons life as the beginning into adulthood for most. I don't think I would want to be a male in the Brazilian Amazon, or the island of Vanuatu where you literally put your life on the line to prove your ready for adulthood. It shows the differences and what is considered important or the role the person plays in society. I think the mention of the sweet 16 for American girls was a pretty weak presentation. America is a melting pot and represents so much more than that.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 11:59 AM

These traditions reflect the cultural geographies they take place within. In the Brazilian Amazon, the locals use the bullet ants native to the area to use in their Bullet Ant Initation. On North Baffin Island, where Inuits must be able to navigate and hunt in the wilderness of the artic, their coming of age involves a hunting journey that begins with them opening up the lines of communication between men and animals a relationship that the survival of the community hinges on. In the Amish tradition, they send their youth out into the world to witness the perils of modern society as a way to provide them with the choice of Amish Living. In Central and South America, girls have a Quinceanera where they girls solidifies their commitment to her family and faith two very important ideals of that culture. These coming of age traditions reflect the cultural differences between places throughout the world.

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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


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Unit 2

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Silvina Paricio Tato's curator insight, September 17, 2014 12:42 PM

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MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 2014 3:16 PM

APHG-U2

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:05 AM

The extremely young median age seen across Africa hints at the problems found throughout the continent. This demographic factor suggests that there are other political, economic, and cultural problems that are influencing these young ages. It shows that most people do not live long lives, and even the older countries on the continent are younger than most other places. The only other place with low ages are the Middle East and Central Asia, and even their populations are several years older than the African continent.

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Moving Argentina’s Capital From Buenos Aires Could Make Things Worse

Moving Argentina’s Capital From Buenos Aires Could Make Things Worse | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Argentina should be careful in considering the implications of the idea of moving the capital [from Buenos Aires] to Santiago del Estero. While a dramatic move might be appealing as a fresh start, it could end up aggravating the challenges of governing the country. Capitals, like flags, are symbols, but their choice has very real consequences."


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Unit 4

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David Lizotte's curator insight, February 9, 7:01 PM

Moving a capital is a pretty intense move. Personally, I find no matter the reason the moving of a capital seems like the government is running from problems it faces/can't fix. One would think, the government having such a central location surrounded by a mass population of people, of which it governs, would be conventional and even helpful. Its close to the crime that it needs to control as well as the economic centers it benefits from. 

I think there are more internal, specific reasons as to why the government is moving. Perhaps corruption? Yet, the article stated corruption is more common amongst rural environments/capitals. Yes, it would be a fresh start. But in time, perhaps a hundred or two hundred years from now, would the government want to pick up and leave? Establish another capital?

Such a capital, isolated from the rest of the functioning country would not benefit Venezuela. A government being involved and not far from issues the largest city/region faces is what a developing country needs. This is certainly an interesting situation. 

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 12, 2:26 PM

It is an interesting piece of information that the country of Argentina would want to move its capital away from Buenos Aires to the small city of Santiago del Estero.  I thought it is an interesting political point brought up that by being far away from the city street mobs, the government would not have to be as accountable for its decisions.  However, the current capital city would certainly not be happy losing its title to a backwater town, and as the article suggest the leaders of the country should think long and hard before they decide on moving the capital.  People can have a strong feeling of pride living in the capital and if that is taken from them, they could lose confidence in the country.  Like the article states, "capitals, like flags, are symbols, but their choice has very real consequences."

Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 13, 11:18 AM

This article discusses how there is a chance that the capital city in Argentina can change from Buenos Aires to a smaller city called Santiago Del Estero which is in the middle-north of the country. Many say this move can heal the divide between the two cities but the bigger picture it that it'll make it a lot worse. I wasn't aware that moving capital cities is actually a more common thing than we think. Buenos Aires is very over populated which is one of the reasons for wanting to move it. The major problem is an outcry from the people living in those cities and rebelling against this which could cause the government more problems. 

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Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..".

Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..". | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

While global population now is almost reaching 7 billion, mainly to due high birth rates in the developing world, many of the more developed parts of Asia (and elsewhere) are facing shrinking population as fewer women are choosing to marry and have children. 

 

This is a very concrete way to discuss the Demographic Transition Model and population issues around the world.   Cultural values shifting, globalization and demographics all merge together in this issue. 


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Unit 2

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Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 3, 2011 8:05 PM
This is absolutely shocking! I never thought this was possible. It is even more shocking that it is so common within many countries and not just Hong Kong. The only two countries that seem to be in good standings are Canada and Brazil. All other 14 are at risk during the years 3000 to about 3050. Now due to this shrinking in female population then leading to just shrinking in population in general, wouldn't this then lead to a serious decrease in our global population and be for the better. Could this then mean more resources and less poverty? Although another idea that just came to mind, this situation would benefit India because they value males over females. The male is favored because they inherit land, pass on the family name, and financially provide for the parents. Overall this female population decline just merges a variety of concerns.
Robert Slone's curator insight, September 23, 2014 8:40 AM

It is amazing how individual decisions can affect everything about the future,even the population of entire societies.

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New Balance struggles as last major athletic shoe brand still manufacturing in U.S.

New Balance struggles as last major athletic shoe brand still manufacturing in U.S. | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Nike? Gone. Adidas? Gone. New Balance, the last major athletic shoe brand still manufacturing in the United States, fights to keep jobs here."   This is an excellent portal for discussing outsourcing, deindutrialization, sectors of the economy and globalization. 


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Unit 6

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Stacey Jackson's comment, February 7, 2013 5:51 PM
I had no idea that New Balance still manufactured their shoes in the US. Sadly, I assumed they were made overseas as most textiles are these days. I'll have to go out and buy a pair of New Balances now.
Cam E's curator insight, January 29, 2014 2:03 PM

The United States, known for its industrial prowess in the past, has become a shadow of what it used to be. Our economy has taken a major turn to a majority service oriented one, with about 70 percent of our GDP coming from Consumption rather than production. Even since the year 2000 the US has lost around 32 percent of its manufacturing jobs. All that can be said through my limited knowledge on the topic is that a nation which switches from production to consumption will likely fall behind others on the path of technological advancement.

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Which States Are in the Midwest?

Which States Are in the Midwest? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Here's a somewhat regular argument I get in: Which states make up which regions of the United States? Some of these regions -- the West Coast, Mountain States, Southwest and Northeast are pretty cl...

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Unit 1 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 2014 2:58 PM

Vernacular regions aren't defined by a one particular trait, but are how we think about places.  These 'regions of the mind' are how we organize information about places, which is why these regions aren't sharp or precise.  In a similar article, they investigate what we consider to be a part of the South using similar crowdsourcing data. 

 

Tags: USA. regionsmapping.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 11:00 AM

This map shows the cultural attributes we place up on a region. When many Americans view a certain region, some images stick out. This map shows that people who live in areas that reflect that Midwestern imagery identify as Midwestern. When I think Midwestern, I picture farming and agriculture, long stretches of fields, people going to work on farms every day. The three states with the highest  response, Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana all fit that image. They are agricultural states.that fit that stereotype.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 9:08 PM

I've gotten into this argument a couple times, the one that sticks out in my mind is one I had with a Rhode Island transplant from Illinois. Being a living historian of the American War for Independence, some of those 18th century ideas leak into my 21st century life. Those transplants, also living historians, were shocked to hear that I claimed anything West of the Appalachians was the "frontier" and therefore, anything above Kentucky and West of Nebraska was the "Midwest". We had a slight friendly exchange of words about what the Midwest is and where it really is. These regional borders Americans have created not only rely on topography, but also with vernacular and culture on a regional level. A state one day could be considered part of the Midwest but a few decades later could be part of Northeast, the South, or any of the other regions.

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As World’s Population Booms, Will Its Resources Be Enough for Us?

As World’s Population Booms, Will Its Resources Be Enough for Us? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
As world population projections soar, there are rising concerns about the impact billions more people will have on the planet.

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Emily Bian's curator insight, September 28, 2014 8:31 PM

The human impact on the environment is getting larger, and not in a good way, as you can tell from the picture. The rise from 1950 to 2011 is HUGE, compared to the rise from 1900 to 1950. Is there anything we can really do about it? Or do we just keep  going at the pace we are going, and just let things happen?

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How The Millennials May Save America

How The Millennials May Save America | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Millennials are the most populous generation in America. From a demographic perspective, this is very good news.


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Ukraine's Geographic Challenge

"Ukraine is the quintessential borderland state. The country borders three former Soviet states and four countries in the European Union.  Ukraine sits on the Northern European Plain, the area that has historically served as an invasion superhighway going east and west."

 

Tags: Ukraine, geopolitics, political.


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America's Ugliest Accent: Boston vs. Chicago, Philly vs. Pittsburgh

America's Ugliest Accent: Boston vs. Chicago, Philly vs. Pittsburgh | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The second round of Gawker's America's Ugliest Accent tournament kicks off right now. Who's worse: Boston or Chicago? Which is uglier, Philadelphia or Pittsburgh? Vote here!
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Unit 3 Go chi town!
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The Political Geography of Hong Kong's Protests

The Political Geography of Hong Kong's Protests | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The territory's residents are demanding democracy in city intersections, not central squares.

 

The significance of the protests, which have brought tens of thousands into the streets, lies not only in what protesters are demanding but also in where they're demanding it—and where they're not. Consider that pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong typically happen in Victoria Park, which is about two and a half miles from Central District and which hosts the annual June 4 candlelight vigil commemorating the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown in Beijing. This time around, however, few police or protesters have ventured there.

The unpredictable, spontaneous geography of the protests is important precisely because it transcends the status quo. It is a testament to how serious these demonstrations are that they refuse to be contained.

Tags: political, conflict, governance, China, East Asia.


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Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 7, 2014 10:02 AM

The increased visibility of the internet and globalization has made large scale demonstration not only a good way to show civil discontent but the preferred method of increasing awareness of an issues across the world. Because Hong Kong is such an integrated part of global economy, they can stage these massive protests without too much fear of violent police reaction, as the world will be quick to condemn such action as soon as it happens. While the protests started as a student movement, it has now spread throughout the city and both younger and older people, students and professionals, have begun to participate. This popular participation shows how serious these issues are to the people of Hong Kong.

Chandler and Zane's curator insight, October 16, 2014 4:44 PM

Political: There have been lots of protest lately in China. Chief executive CY Leung announced that he is planning to shut down Hong Kong's  central district. People are not happy with this and the protest are becoming very big for this little island. 

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:43 PM

The seemingly random geography of protests shows an inability to be contained and how demographics play a key role in these protests. The protests have broken up into multiple smaller groups, blocking off intersections, and popping up in different locations that are not traditionally used for protesting. Instead of amassing in one large group, the protesters are using an almost guerrilla-like tactic by breaking into smaller numbers that are harder to disband or predict. While protests were traditionally held in Victoria Park, these groups are popping up in all sorts of locations, including residential, school, tourist, and shopping locations. Many college and high school aged children are joining the fray, which is why protests are occurring in areas synonymous with students and younger demographics. Families are also getting involved, which is why some are in residential areas. It is evident that people from all different demographics support democracy.  

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World Record Mapping Event

World Record Mapping Event | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Join our FREE GIS Day World Record mapping event taking place during Geography Awareness week (Nov 17th -21nd 2014, video with more details).  With a local to global perspective, we want students to map their thoughts and feeling about their local area.

 

They can add their data to a global map that is shared with the world. Help us achieve our goal of having 100,000 students take part globally.  The event will provide great opportunities for:

 

Using the latest GIS technologySpatial thinkingData analysis with GISMap designConnecting students with their peers worldwide

Tags: mapping, GIS,  K12, ESRI, geospatial, edtech.

 


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We are totally doing this!!!! Unit 1

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CT Blake's curator insight, October 5, 2014 10:40 AM

Aw ay for all of our students on a global basis!

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Geography Soup

"A great resource full of great links to accompany the Geography Soup channel on Vimeo."


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Course resource

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 3, 2014 7:19 PM

Geography Soup is a Vimeo channel designed to include interesting videos that are laden with geographic content in them.  This powerpoint slideshow has resources designed to help you get the most flavor and substance out of these (and any other) video resources.  This is especially great for K-12 students, physical and regional geography.


Tags: K12, video.

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The world as it is: The influence of religion

The world as it is: The influence of religion | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Seldom has it been more important for Americans to form a realistic assessment of the world scene. But our current governing, college-­educated class suffers one glaring blind spot.

Modern American culture produces highly individualistic career and identity paths for upper- and middle-class males and females. Power couples abound, often sporting different last names. But deeply held religious identities and military loyalties are less common. Few educated Americans have any direct experience with large groups of men gathered in intense prayer or battle. Like other citizens of the globalized corporate/consumer culture, educated Americans are often widely traveled but not deeply rooted in obligation to a particular physical place, a faith or a kinship."


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Unit 3

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MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 2014 3:12 PM

APHG-U3

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 22, 2014 11:57 AM

Religion and its influence

Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, January 28, 12:17 PM

My APHUG students will read this article before even beginning our study of religion.  My hope is that this may at the very least help them empathize with the religious fervor that still has such a profound impact on the culture of much of the world.  

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Why this Ebola outbreak became the worst we've ever seen

"The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more people than sum total of all the previous outbreaks since the virus was first identified in 1976. This video explains how it got so bad."  


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Unit 1

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:08 PM

It is very sad watching knowing how it took to so long to get Ebola out to the public and make it known of the very spreadable virus. It’s obvious how since the US can be at risk of getting the virus in our country they now want to make it very known and for people to be cautious of the idea that Ebola can eventually be in the US and spread. We should have been cautious of the virus many years ago, but the rate of the virus spreading, sky rocketed just this year. It’s obvious why it took so many years for the Ebola virus to be known, since it was just known for it to have been in a particular Sierra Leon and Liberia. Since it has spread from there to the border of Guinea and now potentially going to different parts of the world there is no question why there is a health scare in many countries.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, October 28, 2014 10:20 PM

In just a few months the Ebola virus has cumulated out of control. More people became affected and died in the last five months than all of the combined deaths that have occurred since Ebola was first discovered in 1976. Ebola began to spread from rural areas to a border region in West Africa when ill people traveled to the city to work or go to the market, making international spread likely. Mounting a campaign to increase awareness of the risks and to contain the virus was nearly impossible due to the low illiteracy rates. Consequently, health workers were taking ill people away from family and their homes to contaminate centers. This caused much fear and mistrust and was not successful. More people became infected and the snowball effect ensued. When people did show up at ill-equipped hospitals, there were not enough beds or free space and most were turned away. Some health workers walked off the job fearing being infected because of the poor conditions. No gloves, masks or gowns were provided and workers feared for their own health. The ill patients went back into the community and Ebola continued to spread. The response of the global community was not fast enough, and help did not arrive in time before the spread of Ebola became an epidemic. It is clear that in a world that is so closely connected, we must have a global heath system that works.  

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 4, 2014 5:32 PM

Ebola is getting worst every day. one of the things that has caused the spread of this virus is the fact that many working people cross the border to other regions to work or to go to market. Back in days, you used to see this Ebola issue in very rural areas, but now is getting worst. In these areas were the Ebola is getting worst, they do not count with a good health system. Sometimes there are day when they do not have gloves, gowns and mask, and because of that, there have been health care workers who have just walked away from their jobs because they do not want to put in risk their life. This  is a very sad situation, which I hope it get better.

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38 maps that explain the global economy

38 maps that explain the global economy | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Commerce knits the modern world together in a way that nothing else quite does. Almost anything you own these days is the result of a complicated web of global interactions. And there's no better way to depict those interactions than some maps.

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Unit 6

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 26, 2014 11:04 AM

Mapas ...

Mr. Lavold's curator insight, September 28, 2014 7:05 PM

Many ideological issues  relate to economics - and many economic issues related to geography. Take a look at these maps and see if they help you understand the global economy and where Canada fits in. Consider how different ideologies might view these maps and the data that they contain.

Maghfir Rafsan Jamal's curator insight, September 28, 2014 10:45 PM

I find a treasure.. :D

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No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe

No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Birthrates across the Continent are falling at drastic and, to many, alarming rates. Why are Europeans so hesitant to have children, and what does it mean for their future and for ours?

 

Nice piece that show work well for understanding the demographic transition, which links population growth rates with levels of human development.


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 5:39 PM
That is very odd because usually it is the Europeans who want to have many kids. It seems that the Europeans are not so interested in having kids. They just want to enjoy their lives to the fullest. Not having kids could be a bad thing for the population. One reason would be the family genes would be gone because there are no more family members to keep it going. There is one good thing to the decrease of population, which are less people to care for in the world. But Europe should have seen this coming because there was at one point in time there were the most populated country now it has changed to the least populated who would have thought that would happen. But having kids is a great accomplishment that not everyone can have. Many people have disease that stop the production of having kids.
Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:14 PM

This is showing how in the future due to more woman's rights and better  education systems, woman are losing interest in having babies at an early age. Therefore the population in Europe is declining. 

MissPatel's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:06 AM

11 billion people projection for the future but a decline in population in Europe? How? What factors altered this? Why? 

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Cultural Patterns and Food

"Berlin Bureau Chief Michael Slackman looks into the obsession with currywurst, a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder, and brings different Berliners together."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 24, 2014 8:43 AM

This short video has been added to the the interactive map, Place-Based Geography VideosThis depiction of street foods in German cities is a rich, tangible example to show cultural patterns and processes.  Currywurst is a unifying force across socioeconomic classes in Germany, but it is also a product of globalization and cultural interactions across regions.  Culture is not static and this New York Times video can be used to teach the various concepts of culture; per the updated APHG outline, the initial concepts of culture are:  

  • Culture traits
  • Diffusion patterns
  • Acculturation, assimilation and multiculturalism
  • Culture region, vernacular region, cultural hearth
  • Globalization and the effects of technology on culture.


Question to Ponder: How are these 5 major elements of culture seen in this video?


Tags: food, migration, culturediffusion, globalization, consumption, APHG.

Adriene Mannas's curator insight, September 25, 2014 8:00 PM

Unit 1! Culture

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
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Most Commonly Spoken Language Other Than English or Spanish in Each State

Most Commonly Spoken Language Other Than English or Spanish in Each State | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
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A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates

A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Dueling projections of population growth present different visions of the world's future.


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