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What Does Earth Look Like?


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Unit 1

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Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, August 27, 2014 10:24 AM

Des cartes pour comprendre le monde.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:51 AM

APHG-Unit 1

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:18 AM

Mapping and Satellite Imagery

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The World's Ten Largest Megacities

The World's Ten Largest Megacities | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The world is rapidly becoming urban. More than half the world's 7-plus billion people live in urban areas (urban cores, suburbs and small towns)....
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unit 7

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The Individual and the Global

"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." --Maragret Mead


Via Seth Dixon
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final word :)

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Christopher L. Story's curator insight, May 1, 9:46 AM

....yes

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 1, 2:51 PM

If 6% of the population is made aware of a problem, it's enough to trigger definite change. The words of a single person, shared, can spread to 6% of the population.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 3:55 PM

I love the notion and sometimes agree with this idea.  But at the same time it has to be sustained by the people.  It's this exciting idea to be a part of something, but that wears off quickly for a lot of people.  Then they are on to the next thing.  It would be nice if everyone would pick one cause and stay with it for atleast a year.  Maybe make this your New Years Resolution instead of hitting the gym.  

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An earthquake felt across South Asia

An earthquake felt across South Asia | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The magnitude-7.8 earthquake that struck Nepal on Saturday morning destroyed parts of Kathmandu, trapped many people under rubble and killed more than 2,500 people. It was the worst to hit the country since a massive 1934 temblor killed more than 8,000."


Via Seth Dixon
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Map 8

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Ana Carlott G. Ares's curator insight, April 28, 10:52 AM

añada su visión ...

Joshua Mason's curator insight, April 29, 11:04 AM

It's absolutely devastating what happened to Nepal. Any loss of life is a tragedy but loss of this scale is unimaginable. It's going to be a difficult rebuilding process for the Nepalese whether that's coping with the loss or physically rebuilding the nation.

 

Watching footage of shakes, what struck me the most was hundreds of year old temples crumbling. Those just aren't something you can easily rebuild. The building can eventually be replaced but the significance of it is almost lost. 

 

Those temples, like the homes in the area, were most likely not built up to a standard that could withstand earthquakes or at least earthquakes of this magnitude. It's easy to see how destruction on this scale can occur in large urban populations that were not designed to stand against such a dramatic event.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 3:59 PM

I've experienced earthquakes more times than I've ever felt the need.  We used to get them all the time it seemed in Japan.  My bed would role across the room.  It got to the point where I just slept through them.  If I had even felt a shake half as violent as what Nepal went through I could not even imagine the fright.  I wonder how long the India and Eurasia tectonic plates will stay on top of each other?  Or if a few more earth quakes will split the area?  

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HB 3428 Factsheet-031015.pdf

HB 3428 Factsheet-031015.pdf | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Please encourage your parents to contact your state HR and Senators, this would be huge for you and all of our AP students- stop the "brain drain" flashcard term alert :) In short, if passed the new law would require state universities in Illinois to give credit for any AP exam score 3 or above, a policy already in place in 14 states!

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Nigerian opposition candidate leads in election as governing party cries foul

Nigerian opposition candidate leads in election as governing party cries foul | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Ex-dictator Muhammadu Buhari is more than 2m votes ahead but some voices in ruling PDP raise doubts over whether party would accept defeat
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Unit 4
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How does the United Nations work?

"Ever curious about the reaches of the United Nation and what they do? Here's a great video featuring Dr. Binoy Kampmark from RMIT University.  This short video can help improve your understanding of the UN, including its role in world politics and policy making."


Via Seth Dixon
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unit 4

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zane alan berger's curator insight, March 25, 5:32 PM

this video explains- as it says in it's headline- how the UN works. It essentially covers the different operations the UN takes part in to maintain world peace; ranging from security to human rights to disease and so on. It also talks about the security council which consists of France, the UK, US, China, and Russia, along with the general assembly.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 25, 9:11 PM

The United Nations (UN) constantly works on maintaining international peace, economic issues, and cultural and human rights around the world. The UN has a tremendous impact around the world, with 193 nations participating in frequent meeting about how to resolve global and domestic issues and making policies for the world. The UN plays an important role in &maintain[ing] international peace and security; to develop friendly relations among nations; to operate in solving international problems and in promoting respect for human rights; and finally to be a center for harmonizing the actions of nations&(WWW.UN.org). The UN has a lot of responsibilities as it tries to keep the whole world at peace.

Carlee Allen's curator insight, March 26, 7:03 PM

This is a very short and simplified video that explains all about what the UN is and what they do. The UN plays a major role in helping developing countries and taking part with them if they are in need of help or in a crisis. This video also explains what the security council is and what they do.

 

I already knew most of the things mentioned in the video, but I always think that UN things are interesting and I'm always willing to learn more about what they do and how they are helping the world.

 

 

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The shocking differences in basic body language around the world

The shocking differences in basic body language around the world | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The body speaks volumes. But what it says depends on the culture you're in.


Tags: culture, infographic, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
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unit 3

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Gaëlle Solal's curator insight, April 1, 12:58 PM

ça vous en bouche un coin?!

 

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, April 14, 6:00 PM

This shows the costums that several other Countries use in north America we cross our legs but in Countries Like Asia disrespectful. In America we view blowing or Noise is normal in Japan that Considered rude

Roman M's curator insight, April 16, 12:17 PM

This article shows the different customs on gestures or body language in the world. What we might do is disrespectful in another country. For example, even some as simple as crossing your legs while sitting is common in North America and some European countries. However, it is viewed disrespectful in Asia and the Middle East.

RM

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A Japanese restaurant is selling KitKat sandwiches

A Japanese restaurant is selling KitKat sandwiches | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
KitKat sandwiches are officially a thing, and apparently they're delicious
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 3, far from the strangest menu item I've seen come out of the region, but it always makes me ask why do we have the unhealthiest reputation again?  Japan has 15 different flavors of the kit kat bar alone :)

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Who would have guessed that Lincoln Park was seeing population loss?

Who would have guessed that Lincoln Park was seeing population loss? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Chicago's affluent North Side has lost a lot of people. That's a problem for businesses, residents of moderate means and anyone who would like to move there but can't afford to.
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 7 Sometimes "trendy" can be a problem! 

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You Won't Believe How Much Sprawl Costs America

You Won't Believe How Much Sprawl Costs America | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
More than $1 trillion, according to a new report.

Via Allison Anthony
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unit 7

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Redrawing the map of Europe

"Fantasy cartography: An animated redrawing of the map of Europe.
Imagine a world in which countries could move as easily as people. A suggestion for a rearranged Europe."


Via Seth Dixon
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unit 1

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Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 4:13 PM

Summary: This is an interesting video that rearranges all the countries of Europe and moving them to the most convenient locations. This gives us a good idea of what Europe may look like if countries could move like people. 

 

Insight:This video really illustrates the 1st unit because it gives a good example of how greatly place can influence many other geographic concepts such as international relations.

Gabby cotton's curator insight, March 24, 1:49 AM

Unit 4: Political organization and space

This short video analyzes European countries and their relations and tries to reorganize accordingly, the grouping categories seem to be relations, languages, and Ethnic groups.

 

This relates to human geography because it talks about how different countries and ethnic groups get along and try to find the best possible solution to ensure the comfort of all involved nations. It talks about re-arranging borders and population density. 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, March 24, 2:01 AM

Unit 1

Summary

This video shows countries being able to move easily in order for each countries benefit. Many countries are moved away from their enemies or other feared countries. Also in this idealistic video countries that are landlocked are able to move to places with easier access to water. It also includes moving countries and territories to be near countries that would work well together.

Insight

This personifies countries as moving as they please, literally. I found this a little funny and pretty interesting to see what countries would do if they could daily move. It really reveals the importance of location and geography for countries in that countries are stuck where they are for the most part ad can't just move away from their enemies of conditions. 

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Morocco: Western Sahara Conflict Reaches British Court

Morocco: Western Sahara Conflict Reaches British Court | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Europeans are familiar with efforts, some of them successful, to label agricultural and consumer products produced by Jewish settlers in the West Bank as coming from the Palestinian West Bank, not from Israel, in order to allow consumers to make an educated decision about whether or not they wish to support Israel's continuing occupation of that territory. A similar effort is now underway in the United Kingdom to label produce coming from Western Sahara. The campaign, launched by campaigners for the freedo
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 4 and a little bit of 5-6

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Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 8:23 PM

This article discusses the labeling of products that are produced by Jew peoples in the West Bank, versus people coming out of the Palestinian West Bank. This applies to the labeling practices we discussed when learning about agriculture and the steps that should be taken in order to ensure the people about what exactly they are consuming, and in this case, the origin of the product as well.

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The Runner-Up Religions Of America

The Runner-Up Religions Of America | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

 

"Glance at the map above, Second Largest Religious Tradition in Each State 2010, and you will see that Buddhism (orange), Judaism (pink) and Islam (blue) are the runner-up religions across the country.

No surprises there. But can you believe that Hindu (dark orange) is the No. 2 tradition in Arizona and Delaware, and that Baha'i (green) ranks second in South Carolina? These numbers, although they look impressive when laid out in the map, represent a very tiny fraction of the population in any of the states listed."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 3

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Matthew Connealy's curator insight, March 23, 9:42 PM

This map and article tells us about the runner up religions in each state of the U.S. More specifically, the Baha'i faith in South Carolina is a very rich and historical religion in the area, despite being so small. There are many Baha'i organizations in the cities and since the 60's their goal is to bring different races together and form community with one another. In Delaware, Hinduism is the runner up religion. With most Indians dominating the software engineering field, they flock towards these jobs in Delaware, thus increasing the Hindu population.

 

Christianity is the most followed religion in the U.S., and this map is very interesting to analyze. It was coo to read about the Baha'i influence in South Carolina and look at how they make an impact. This article slides right in with religion in the syllabus.

Zeke Robinson's curator insight, March 23, 11:49 PM

I think that this is very intresting about how the country is divided up into the different religion barriers.

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, March 24, 9:40 PM

Religion and sacred places-

 

This article displays the second most known and used religions  in the US. This explains why their is no christianity in the picture. In the end, the Islamic religion is mostly used in the eastern countries, and Buddhism is the mostly used religion in the western countries.

 

This article represents religion and sacred places because it  portrays the image of how so many different religious divides there are in the US.

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How We Built the Ghettos

How We Built the Ghettos | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A brief introduction to America's long history of racist housing policy.
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unit 7

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These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore

These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
How vacant houses trace the boundaries of Baltimore's black neighborhoods.

 

The map on the left shows one very tiny dot for each person living in Baltimore. White people are blue dots, blacks are green, Asians are red and Hispanics yellow.The map on the right shows the locations of Baltimore City's 15,928 vacant buildings. Slide between the two maps and you'll immediately notice that the wedge of white Baltimore, jutting down from the Northwest to the city center, is largely free of vacant buildings. But in the black neighborhoods on either side, empty buildings are endemic.


Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, economic, race, poverty, spatial, housing.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 7

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 29, 9:41 AM

Maps like these should be drafted about every part of the world.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, April 29, 7:00 PM

Inequality 

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It wasn’t just the Armenians: The other 20th century massacres we ignore

It wasn’t just the Armenians: The other 20th century massacres we ignore | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Last week marked the 100th anniversary of the killings of more than a million Armenians during the dying days of the Ottoman Empire. Despite considerable opposition from the Turkish government, the anniversary is bringing renewed attention to an often overlooked historical issue, with President Obama in particular facing criticism for not using the word 'genocide' to describe the killings. The 20th century was bloody and violent, and while some horrors are at least relatively well-known – the Holocaust or the genocides in Rwanda and Cambodia, for example – others have become mere footnotes in history."

 

Tags:  genocide, political, conflict, war, refugees, empire, colonialism, historical.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

units 2,and four :(

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Padriag John-David Mahoney's curator insight, April 28, 6:18 PM

I have often thought about this. The Armenian genocide was the first genocide of the 20th century, but was largely forgotten. Very few- VERY FEW- American students learn about it before college or high school. What do we learn about? The only genocide I remember being taught in school was the Holocaust- the Jewish Genocide at the hands of Nazi Germany. But there was also the genocide and apartheid in Rwanda and the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia. My father taught me all about all of these genocides. There is a statue outside Auschwitz concentration camp with the inscription "Never Again". But what have the many organizations done to prevent or reveal such atrocities? I don't see the Shoah foundation standing up for the Armenians now, or the victims of the Cambodian or Rwandan genocides. I believe the inscription on that statue truly means ''Never again.........to the Jews''

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The History of a City Underfoot

The History of a City Underfoot | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
You never need to ask New Yorkers where they’re going. They’re already there.
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unit 7

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Nigeria elections: Mapping a nation divided

Nigeria elections: Mapping a nation divided | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Nigeria is Africa's biggest oil producer and most populous country - but many of its people are impoverished and the country is in the grip of a violent uprising by Islamists Boko Haram.
Courtney Barrowman's insight:
Units 3 & 6-note the regional disparities, unit 4-what will the impending election bring?
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A bird's-eye view of war-torn Syria

A bird's-eye view of war-torn Syria | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A school that lays in ruins, hospitals and refugee camps under attack, and a city center with the size of Manhattan destroyed by shelling — these are some of the shocking details of a new United Nations report on the conflict in Syria, four years after in began.


Tags: Syria, MiddleEast, conflict, political, remote sensing.


Via Seth Dixon
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unit 4

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Connor Hendricks's curator insight, March 23, 4:31 PM

This is a artical about how Syria is in the middle of a war. I think this a good example of how some nationalities are thrown together and each one if fighting for control of the state.

Kyle Freeman's curator insight, March 23, 10:43 PM

This is an interesting article as it provides many before and after photos of conflict on the Syrian landscape. The distribution of the contestants for Syria is also interesting. The Kurds up at the top are not that far into Syria but have taken up a small portion. The Syrian government forces have large concentrations around the major cities that have not already been taken. The orange rebels (many different rebel groups) have taken a large portion of land between the two cities called Aleppo and Hama. While ISIS has taken Deir al-Zour, a city on the Euphrates river, which will provide a better farming area and source of natural water to use. This armed conflict is interesting because there are four factions at play all looking for a different goal. ISIS is on a religious quest to create an Islamic State. The kurds simply want a state of their own. The rebels are interested in overthrowing the current Syrian government where the Syrian government clearly doesn't want that to happen. All of these conflicting views has turned Syria into a battleground.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 25, 9:13 PM

It is heartbreaking to see these images from the satellite of how Syrian lands were devastated after massive shelling to different cities. Infrastructure had been destroyed and also left many causalities in multiple areas. Cities have been reshaped due to excessive migration of citizens to neighboring countries such as Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey, and Iraq. Around 3 million Syrian citizens have migrated since the conflict started between the rebellious Syrian government and terrorist Islamic state. Targeted cities such as as Aleppo suffered the most damage in the attacks. Refugee camps have stared to resemble big cities. Syrian citizens are living in makeshift camps, however refugee camps are supposed to be provisional but they have become permanent places to live in order to ensure survival.

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Roam the World in (Almost) Real Time

Roam the World in (Almost) Real Time | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A groundbreaking Mapbox project ushers in a new era for online cartography.

 

On Google Earth, the seasons rarely change. Most anywhere a digital traveler goes, the sky is cloudless and the grass is green. No snow on the ground in Iowa. No fire in Valparaiso. It's a big gap between the world as it is and as it's mapped.

Launched Thursday,a landmark project from Mapbox has changed the summertime paradigm for online cartography. Landsat-live reveals the planet's surface in real time and in stunning resolution, fed by a constant stream of public-domain imagery from NASA’s Landsat 8 satellite.


Via Seth Dixon
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unit 1

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Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 12:47 PM

In this article we are shown the development and evolution of cartography. We can observe the changing geography on the planet and the real time gives us an accurate reading. I feel like this innovation could greatly help us.

YEC Geo's curator insight, March 23, 11:59 AM

This sounds really cool.

 

UPDATE:  I've had a chance to look at this. 

 

Cool things:  great images.

 

Not so cool:  It's not a substitute for Google Earth.   You can only pan out or in to a limited degree, so to go from Texas to Timbuctoo, for example, would take a lot of clicking and dragging.  Best way to get to a place is to type it in the search box.  No 3-D view also. And if there are a lot of clouds when the image was taken, they'll obscure the landscape.

 

That being said, if you want to see large-scale, recent images of a particular place, it's a good site. 

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 4:34 PM

Summary: This interesting article talks a lot about modern technologies effect on the popularity of geography. This article talks about how programs like Google Earth have caused a general interest to arise about physical geography.

 

Insight: This article is significant to unit 1 because it shows how GIS can be so influential to not only geographers but to the rest of society.

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Cartographically Inspired Fashion

Cartographically Inspired Fashion | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

I found this on pinterest (where else?) and decided to share the geographically inspired craftiness:

1. Paint your nails white/cream
2. Soak nails in alcohol for five minutes
3. Press nails to map and hold
4. Paint with clear protectant immediately after it dries.

This also works with newspaper, but don't try it with NatGeo Maps because the paper is of too high a quality to have the ink bleed out; I would recommend using an old USGS Topo map. 

 

Tags: fun, art.


Via Seth Dixon
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I heart maps!  I cant wait for spring break to try this :)

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Mrs. B's curator insight, March 25, 8:13 AM

Yes to map fashion! I saw a woman with a map skirt - so cool. MAPSMAPSMAPS!!!

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Orthodox Jews in central Ohio toss old hot plates after tragic N.Y. fire

Orthodox Jews in central Ohio toss old hot plates after tragic N.Y. fire | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Some members of the Jewish community in central Ohio are tossing old appliances after seven Orthodox Jewish children died in a Brooklyn, N.Y., fire caused by a malfunctioning electric hot plate used to keep food warm during the Sabbath.
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 3, many have been questioning how long is too long before truly reconsidering a longstanding cultural tradition. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 11:50 AM

These deaths were so unnecessary, both from religious and a technological safety standpoints.  I do honor their desire to maintain religious purity and hope that everyone can finding a safe manner to do so; I think this will serve as a huge wake-up call to reconsider some traditions, or the interpretations thereof. 


All religions and folk cultures today are all searching for ways to maintain their most values tradition in a midst of a modernized, secular world that might often scorns them as backwards.  Most religions developed customs in a different technological and cultural context and finding how to do so is a balancing act...this was one of the over-arching themes of the classic film Fiddler on the Roof; Tevye, an observant Russian Jew searches for the core values behind his most prized traditions and seeks to keep observing them and his daughters continually push the limits of tradition.

Courtney Barrowman's comment, March 25, 12:36 PM
I like the way you pointed out the balancing act of finding a way to keep the most valuable traditions in a modern technological and cultural context. Thanks for your input-
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Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia

Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The purpose-built city of Naypyidaw – unveiled a decade ago this year – boasts 20-lane highways, golf courses, fast Wi-Fi and reliable electricity. The only thing it doesn’t seem to have is people, report Matt Kennard and Claire Provost


Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, urban, urbanism.


Via Seth Dixon
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unit 7

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Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 16, 3:28 PM

"Build it and they will come" is how the old saying goes, however in the case of Burma's capital city this is very far from the truth.  In fact, the large highways constructed and the city itself remains largely unpopulated with most of the country's urban population living in the old capital of Rangoon.  It is crazy how unpopulated the city is, in fact as the article states, the British Top Gear team dragged race through the streets.  As a car guy, this must be an amazing thing to do safely and legally.  Due to the lack of traffic, this is exactly what can take place in Naypyidaw.  The article is right in the sense it looks like it is a post-apocalyptic view of the United States suburbian sprawl.  The fact that a city which is far more advanced can remain so desolate is a strange thing for an American to consider, but the government is repressive in the country and forces people to either move there or move away.  Another interesting fact is that the hotels are "cheaply built", referring to the inside of the rooms.  The city will most likely take a long time to become a functioning city where people actually live, instead of one where drag races can take place down the main streets.

 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 28, 5:19 PM

I thought the saying was "If you build it, they will come".  Well I guess thats not the case here.  Astonishing that a capitol city can be so underpopulated, although thats the way the country seemed to have wanted it when they moved where the capitol city was located.  It just goes to show the importance of certain things in some places in the world compared to others.  I bet the people of Jakarta would love to have this 2o lane highway running through their city.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 4:35 PM

This was an interesting idea.  But it has not quite accomplished what they wanted.  Maybe they needed to build some businesses to draw the working class and middle class.  Otherwise, who wants to be in an area with no action.  

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Quiz on the Differences Between Sunni and Shia Islam

Quiz on the Differences Between Sunni and Shia Islam | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Most of the world's major religions are made up of multiple sects or denominations, and Islam is no different. Islam's two major sects are the Sunnis and the Shiites, and the division and interplay between the two is a major factor in the geopolitics of the Middle East. How well do you understand Sunni and Shiite Islam? Take our quiz and find out!

Via Seth Dixon
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unit 3

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BEAULIEU ADRIEN's curator insight, March 26, 5:53 AM

Comprenez la différence entre sunnites et shiites facilement grace à cet article;

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 4:17 PM

 A nice little quiz that tests your knowledge on Sunni and Shia Islam.  I myself scored a 69 so there is much to learn for me on the differences between the 2.  The Shia are thought of as the more extreme of the two sects, so I was shocked to see that Hussein and Bin Ladin were both Sunni.  The complications between these two are important to know about as they are making headlines in world news.  Its tough to understand these people when you know nothing about their history.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 6, 10:19 PM

After taking this class about Political Islam I thought I knew about Sunni and Shiite Islam.  Taking this quiz I definitely mixed up a lot of the information.  It seems like it would be simple to understand the differences and the similarities, but they are so parallel its easy to get the information mixed up.  

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First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga

First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

The first photographs have emerged of a newly formed volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean after three men climbed to the peak of the land mass off the coast of Tonga. Experts believe a volcano exploded underwater and then expanded until an island formed. The island is expected to erode back into the ocean in a matter of months.


Via Seth Dixon
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unit 4

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 9, 11:14 PM

As a photographer and geographer, I am fascinated by landscape photography especially GP Orbassano's photography of Tonga. According to these photographs, we see depth in the oceans based on the ocean color and we see that Tonga is an archipelago. Also, Tonga is more known for it's traveling, hiking and tourism rather than lives being spent there. The Green lake (also known as Crater lakes) in the crater of one of the islands of Tonga is a small body of water which is surrounded by land and it smells of sulphur because it's completely surrounded by a large sediment. It is caused after a volcanic eruption which is common in Tonga and it creates new land and carries out water known as green lakes.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 28, 5:42 PM

This is one of the coolest things about geography, being able to see land formations take place and evolve before your eyes.  There is always so much talk in the history of time of the world losing land and other amazing structures.  Its nice to see the world gaining land mass for a change.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, May 4, 10:52 PM

A mile long volcanic island has formed in the Pacific Ocean that is now safe enough to walk on.  The island started growing a month ago and it is thought that an underwater explosion happened in order to form this island.  The island won't have a name until scientists figure out how long the island will survive.  It is pretty amazing that land masses form from out of nowhere and allow us the chance to study them and learn more about the Earth.