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From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Today's volume of immigrants, in some ways, is a return to America’s past.

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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 5, 2015 2:12 PM

Many people in 2015 feel that immigration-reform is an absolute must for America.  They usually use words like, "illegal", "terrorists", or "welfare-recipients" to try and scare the rest of the country into thinking immigration has spiraled out of control.  Immigration definitely has a different make-up from a hundred years ago, but that doesn't equate to it being a problem.

 

An article like this puts much into perspective.  What most naive and ignorant immigration-reformers might not now before reading this article is that the proportion of our current population has a fewer percentage of immigrants than back in 1910.  This fact is totally opposite from the picture that some critics try to draw, essentially, comparing immigration to millions of fire-ants invading our country.

 

Most immigrants now come from Latin America, whereas, in 1910 they came from Germany.  By reading the article, common sense will tell you that there might be more of a "racism" problem than an "immigration" problem in America.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, September 16, 2015 1:03 PM

Its interesting to me how the primary source of immigrants only shifts from Germany to Mexico in the 1990's, as opposed to when the country was cut in half in the fifties or during WWII. I had always thought that those events would limit German immigration more, however it appears that the primary reason for the shift is more due to the recent (relatively) drug war which erupted in Mexico.

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:21 PM

The source of migrants today has changed the cultural composition of the United States from what is was 100 years ago.  Cultures are not static and migration is one of the key drivers of change. These maps produced by the Pew Research Center. Despite what media reports would have you believe, immigration into the United States is not on the rise, but maps such as these can be construed to imagine that there is a flow of immigrant coming from south of the border.  The reality is that migration from Mexico to the United States has steadily dropped since 1999.  


Tags: migration, historical, USA, mapping, census, ethnicity.

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Desalination: the quest to quench the world's thirst for water

Desalination: the quest to quench the world's thirst for water | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Technological advances have made removing salt from seawater and waste water less energy-intensive, but will they simply encourage us to use more?
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'David Beckham ruined my favela!' Slum-dwellers attack star over house

'David Beckham ruined my favela!' Slum-dwellers attack star over house | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
EXCLUSIVE: Rumours that David Beckham, left on a visit to Brazil, has bought a trendy 'shack' in a notorious Rio de Janeiro slum have driven up house prices, residents say.
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Rust Belt Rebirth Through Gentrification?

It’s become difficult to afford urban living in places like San Francisco, New York or even Portland, but there is an alternative. In Rust Belt cities like Pittsburgh, Buffalo and Cincinnati, you can buy or rent for about 1/10th the price.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 18, 2015 11:37 AM

I've discussed Cincinnati's gentrification several times here, but this video adds the personal touch where you can see into the mind, ethos and motives of those moving in to poorer neighborhoods with hopes to renovate a community where the logic of 'disinvestment' has prevailed for decades.  Gentrification is often criticized for displacing the urban poor, but this shows how some are eager to tie themselves into the fabric of the neighborhood as the neighborhood is changing; they aren't just wealthy people buying out the poor. 


Tags: neighborhoodlandscape, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economicAPHG, Cincinnati

Nicholas Widaman's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:54 PM

This clip talks about how people are "migrating" to more industrial based cities because the rent is so cheap.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 4:24 PM

I like this idea of gentrification, meaning you rebuild and renovate something that is old, dilapidated, and really not worth fixing up. Renovating places like this brings a whole new atmosphere to the area, it brings it to life, a life it once had that it lost. Renovating these areas is also probably good, because it raises the value of the area and higher value areas may just attract people to come see. Also, fixing up old restaurants, bars or other forms of entertainment might be enticing to people that are local and far away to check out what is new. Also, in general it will bring new economy to the area, renovating means construction jobs, finished construction jobs lead to new jobs because something can open in a newly renovated building and that new business will need employees. 

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Beijing's Facelift

"A government-initiated redevelopment plan will transform one of the oldest neighborhoods in Beijing into a polished tourist attraction."


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Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 26, 2015 2:24 PM

In Beijing, China the government has plans to turn one of the oldest neighborhoods in Beijing, Gulou, to a tourist attracting. This is one of the only areas that the government did not knock down in the mass urbanization missions. Most of the residences here are poor and much of life is lived in public. Hopefully the tourist attraction will garnish money and jobs for the cities inhabitants. Large areas of the old broken down neighborhood will be turned into shops, hotels, and a museum. Inhabitants of the area to be knocked down will be moved to high rises on the outskirts of town. Some are mad and feel that the city should not be touched at all and that would be the correct way to preserve it as a historical sight.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 3, 2015 7:39 PM

Normally I am annoyed at projects that end up destroying history, but in this instance I think the area needs to be remodeled. Part of the reason I am not fazed by the history being lost is because a fair amount of the area was already so poorly kept that many of the structures were either ruble or dilapidated. At the rate the area was going, it was already going to lose its history anyways. While it would be nice of the government to keep a small portion of the good standing landscape, I think the museum being built in the area is a nod at maintaining there history. So since you can’t have it all, I would rather side with the government trying to raise the standard of living for people who have been in continuous abject poverty since about the 13th century. As you said before, invest something in an area and you typically get something in return. Plus it seems that most of the people angered by this move are those outside of the area being remodeled (i.e. historians). I personally think those people are farther removed from the actual decision then those living there. So once again, I am happy to side with the people being most affected by the poverty stricken land. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:27 AM

As a man who graduated with a Bachelor's degree in History,  it goes without saying that this causes me sadness.  But even taking the history component out of the picture, this reformation project is also destroying much of that area's culture and identity.  They are risking the few details that remain of their culture's past in order to move the area onto a more global scale.  Another negative is the fact that they are picking up the poverty-stricken residents of this community and shipping them to another part of town like they are pieces of livestock.

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Remarks by the President in Address to the Illinois General Assembly

Remarks by the President in Address to the Illinois General Assembly | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
House Chamber Illinois State Capitol Springfield, Illinois 1:03 P.M. CST
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Unit 4 Gerrymandering

About two thirds of the way into the speech:

"The fact is, today technology allows parties in power to precision-draw constituencies so that the opposition’s supporters are packed into as few districts as possible.  That’s why our districts are shaped like earmuffs or spaghetti.  (Laughter.)  It’s also how one party can get more seats even when it gets fewer votes."

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Spoof Candidate, Jerry Mandering

"Ok…we’ll admit it. Jerry Mandering isn’t a real political candidate.  We created this video to highlight the absurdity of the process behind having elected officials draw their own lines to their advantage – a manipulative practice known as 'gerrymandering.' Public officials like Del. Jerry Mandering wish you wouldn’t worry about the fact that he can pick and choose his own voters, but you can let your legislators know that you support a non-partisan effort for fairer, more competitive elections."


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Unit 4---Love IT!!!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 20, 10:05 AM

This spoof video was highlighted in a Washington Post article, and like most parodies, it wouldn't be funny if there weren't so much truth in it. 

 

Tags: political, gerrymandering, mapping, unit 4 political.

Ethan Conner's curator insight, February 10, 9:34 AM

This video along with the following written paragraph highlights the unfairness and injustice of gerrymandering. This video raises the awareness of how unfair and illegal this is for map makers. Following in the paragraph below, it further explains how unfair this is. This is what the video and article are about

Logan scully's curator insight, February 10, 9:36 AM

I believe gerrymandering is unfair and just plain out dumb. Even though this commercial/ video is quite comical and not serious, it defines a serious problem in society. The practice of gerrymandering is something that some candidates don't want you to know about because they can choose who they want to vote for them. -L.S.

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How geography shapes international politics

How geography shapes international politics | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Tim Marshall explains how world geography colors national development and foreign relations.

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want to read...unit 4

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 8, 3:37 PM

I haven't read the book yet, but am interested to see how Tim Marshall handles the topic to see it is a nuanced telling of how geographic impacts politics or if it strays into environmental determinism.  Based solely on the reviews it should be worth a read and my copy is on it's way. 

 

Tags: book reviews, historical, geopolitics.

Jacob Clauson's curator insight, February 4, 9:56 AM

Maps!

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Romania’s lost generation: inside the Iron Curtain’s orphanages

Romania’s lost generation: inside the Iron Curtain’s orphanages | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Romania's Soviet-era approach to child rearing led to one of history’s most comprehensive studies on the effects of institutionalisation on young children.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 9, 10:00 PM

In the past I have highlighted pro-natalist government policies (and private encouragement) such as Singapore's National Night and Denmark's "Do it for Denmark!" Those programs and policies are designed to slow down declining populations; agency, choice and the well-being of the next generation are deeply embedded into the fabric of those plans.  This horrific, historical example shows everything that could go wrong with enforced pro-natalists policies in an authoritarian government.  

 

TagsRomania, declining populations, historicalgovernance.

 

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, February 4, 5:08 PM

Being isolatex out does just asmuch jarm as being institutionalized in

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Agromafia

Agromafia | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
In Italy, Bill Whitaker finds out that the long arms of the Mafia extend to agricultural products, especially olive oil, on which the mob makes huge profits by exporting imitations
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10 Countries With Weird New Year Traditions

10 Countries With Weird New Year Traditions | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Celebrating New Year is a global event. But there are a few countries, which go over the top. Here are 10 such countries with odd New Year traditions. Denmark


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Wherefore art thou Romeoville?

Wherefore art thou Romeoville? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Chicago suburbs of Romeoville and Joliet were once named Romeo and Juliet. We explored why.
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Do we live in a memorial or mistake Toponym ? Unit 3

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Why Little Kids in Japan Are So Independent

Why Little Kids in Japan Are So Independent | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
In Japan, small children take the subway and run errands alone, no parent in sight. The reason why has more to do with social trust than self-reliance.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, October 7, 2015 7:38 AM

social trust

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:49 AM

If this happened in the United States, it would lead the cable news channels for about a year. Most Parents in our country will hardly ever let their small children leave the house, never mind actually be by themselves for a long time period. This video is an excellent showcase of the differences between western and eastern cultures. The eastern culture prioritize independence at an early age. They make a point of making sure that children can become self sustainable. In the west, we go to extraordinary links to shield our children from the ugliness of every day society. We are more fearful of the horrors that might occur to our children if we allow them to explore society. Neither approach can be judged as correct or wrong. They are just two different ways of raising children in a complex and often freighting world.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:27 PM

It's interesting to see the cultural differences that facilitate these drastically different parenting strategies held by the Japan and the United States. In the US, our capitalistic society puts every man on his own- we are told not to help others, nor to ask for help. From the treks we made across the continent to our reluctance, as a society, to accept welfare programs as a necessity in an industrialized democratic society, Americans strive for solitude and independence. There isn't a sense of community in many parts of the country, and as a result, we are less likely to trust one another- I remember reading about two parents being invested by Child Services because they allowed their 9 year old child to walk with his younger sister to school. To think that such attitudes could be held on such a large scale, as they are in Japan, is laughable. We are told as we grow up how unsafe we really are. In Japan, the community- the collective- is held as the ideal, and people are taught to be able to trust strangers, to expect the best from them. The result? A safer society and the perception that Japanese society as a whole is safer. Children are able to walk freely in public and not be afraid, and public transit and walking are more widely accepted in urban areas. Tokyo may or may not be the world's safest large city, but it certainly feels so for its inhabitants, and I fail to see how that isn't better than the fear Americans have for our neighbors. This is something we need to address as a society, and we should start by looking at our ally across the Pacific. 

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The Geography of E-Waste

The Geography of E-Waste | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The world is increasingly going hi-tech. Many people in our high consumption society want the latest and the greatest; last year’s much anticipated laptops and cell phones are miles behind the newest models that are coming out. So what happens with the old models? Even thrift stores are politely not accepting them as donations. Even some workable machines that were highly valuable 10 years ago are now functionally trash in our society. We can’t put it to the curb to end up in the landfill because of the lead, mercury, and other hazardous materials that can leak into the environment. This type of trash is what we call e-waste. The geography of e-waste is an ‘out of sight out of mind’ problem that we rarely think about but need to due to the ecological impacts of our collective consumption.


Tags: pollution, sustainability, environment, resources, Ghana, Africa.


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 4:04 PM

This is why there is so much illegal dumping that goes on because these companies make this hi-tech equipment knowing full well it becomes outdated in now probably a few years because they already have it planned out with new stuff every year to keep production going. Guess where all this dumping goes? To the poor countries let them deal with it. Really nice.

www.cheapassignmenthelp.com's curator insight, November 6, 2015 5:39 AM

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 6, 2015 5:22 PM

Areas of proaction and consumption / glean connections between places

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13 Regional Insults to Offend People Across the U.S.

13 Regional Insults to Offend People Across the U.S. | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Americans certainly don’t lack insults for people in other states or cities.
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Rio's Olympic village: a green housing dream, but a gentrification nightmare – video

Rio's Olympic village: a green housing dream, but a gentrification nightmare – video | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Ihla Pura, a huge new neighborhood under construction in advance of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, aims to be a model of sustainable development. But critics say it may only reinforce inequality in the area
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Gentrification: Views From Both Sides of the Street

Gentrification: Views From Both Sides of the Street | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Despite the fact that Detroiters will get the benefits of newfound energy, enthusiasm, and even money, it's unrealistic to expect a group who is scared of the unknown and having power stripped away to welcome outsiders with open arms.

 

 BM: Detroit has been down in a slump for a while and with gentrification(adding people of wealthier income) into the the Midtown neighborhood of Detroit. Despite the wealth of income in Midtown the rest of the City still has an average income of around $28,000 which is pretty weak compared to Midtown's average income of $111,000. One could argue that this gentrification project is not going at the pace desired. Slow and steady...


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EU debates biopiracy law to protect indigenous people

EU debates biopiracy law to protect indigenous people | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Pharmaceutical companies would need to compensate indigenous people for using their knowhow in creating new medicines

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 25, 2014 10:16 AM

new vocabulary for us all and unit 5!

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:27 PM

APHG-Unit 4

Shawn Wright's curator insight, September 7, 2014 8:20 AM

The  Nagoya protocol is an international biological diversity convention. The protocol would at it's core require permission, acknowledgment of source knowledge  or practice and compensation for the use of cultural wisdom.


i don't see Nagoya as a perfect solution - there is a lot of room for language interpretation so slick corporate lawyers will find ways to legally cheat indigenous peoples from their share but I do see it as at least A small step in the right direction.   


The World Health Organisation estimates that 4 billion people, 80% of the world's population, use herbal medicine in primary healthcare. 


Cherokees Believe and have practiced healing from plant and water for thousands of years. Every and any human sickness has a plant who can cure it. Every plant in the world has a purpose if we but learn to hear and understand what that is - there are no weeds to the Cherokee.


Yona Shawn

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"The Indian Wars Never Ended"- 2007 NARF PSA 30 sec.

Celebrating 38 years of standing firm for justice. Founded in 1970, the Native American Rights Fund (NARF) is the oldest and largest nonprofit law firm dedic...
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Unit 4-- I know its from 2007 but I just saw this last night :)

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Women expand their home on the range

Women expand their home on the range | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
According to the U.S. Agriculture Department, the number of women-operated farms increased from 5 percent to 14 percent between 1978 and 2007. Today, counting principal operators and secondary operators, women account for 30 percent of all farmers in the United States, or just under 1 million.Some women regard themselves less as entrepreneurs and more as gentle stewards of the land, or bulwarks against corporations overtaking family farms and developers sweeping in with seductive offers. Others are drawn to the farm-to-fork movement, where locally grown produce and meat hold much greater appeal. Also, more women are inheriting farms and ranches.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 27, 10:44 AM

When we discusss gender in an agricultural context, it is usually to point out that around the world, women are approximately half of the agricultural workforce, and in less developed countries they often comprise the majority of the the agricultural sector.  U.S. students find this shocking, given that traditional cultural norms often perceive farm work as a very masculine domain.  However, that has slowing been changing in the last 30 years as more women in the U.S. are owning and operating farms.  There isn't one simple reason to explain this shift, but it is indicative of broader social changes.

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, cultural norms, gender, agriculture, labor.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, March 14, 8:49 AM
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Why don't black and white Americans live together?

Why don't black and white Americans live together? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
In many parts of the US, Americans of different races aren't neighbours - they don't go to the same schools, they don't always have access to the same services.

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unit 7

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 9, 9:11 PM

This article is filled with good geography (and more specifically AP Human Geography) vocabulary.  Redlining, blockbusting, and racial covenants are all discussed as spatial process that have shaped socioeconomic and racial characteristics in American cities. 

 

Tags: neighborhood, urban, socioeconomic, racepoverty, spatialhousing.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, February 2, 9:30 AM

We have the same separation in DC. East of the River...

Pieter de Paauw's curator insight, February 15, 6:22 AM

Segregatie in beeld

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English and Its Undeserved Good Luck: Lingua Franca

English and Its Undeserved Good Luck: Lingua Franca | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"In my post last week I cited a few ways in which English is unsuitable as a global language, and mentioned that its being one anyway is attributable at least in part to undeserved luck. Of course, it wasn’t all luck."

 

Tags: language, colonialism,  diffusion, culture, English.


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jorden harris's curator insight, March 10, 10:02 AM
the fact that out of all of the languages that could have been a lingua franca is suprising J.H.
Logan scully's curator insight, March 10, 10:13 AM
It is astouding to me that out of all those languages that could have been a lingua franca.-L.S.
Cohen Adkins's curator insight, March 10, 10:18 AM
In my opinion i believe that English should be used and learned by every country since most of the world already uses it.It would be more convenient for others to speak English however people should also be required to learn a side language and not just for college. -C.A
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Saudi Arabia severs ties with Iran as protests rage - CNN.com

Saudi Arabia severs ties with Iran as protests rage - CNN.com | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia is severing ties with Iran after an attack on the Saudi embassy in Tehran. The attack came after Saudi Arabia executed Shiite cleric Nimr al-Nimr.

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Units 3 and 4

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Pidgin now recognized as official language

Pidgin now recognized as official language | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
HONOLULU – It was born on the Hawaiian plantation fields. It now resides in the U.S. Census. Pidgin, the unmistakable, enchanting language of locals has been recogniz
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Why Somaliland is not a recognized state

Why Somaliland is not a recognized state | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"SOMALILAND, a slim slice of Somali-inhabited territory on the southern shore of the Gulf of Aden, ticks almost all the boxes of statehood. It has its own currency, a reasonably effective bureaucracy and a trained army and police force. But it has yet to receive official recognition from a single foreign government in the years since it declared independence in 1991. To the outside world, it is an autonomous region of Somalia, subject to the Somali Federal Government (SFG) in Mogadishu. Why is it not a state?  Throughout the post-independence era, geopolitics in Africa has tended to respect 'colonial borders', i.e. the borders laid down by European colonial powers in the 19th century. Across the continent, there have been only two significant alterations to the colonial map since the 1960s: the division of Eritrea from Ethiopia, in 1993; and South Sudan from Sudan, in 2011."


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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, November 19, 2015 7:55 AM

SOMALILAND,

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 19, 2015 1:35 PM

unit 4

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:55 PM

Like many new developing countries, it is hard to overcome the hardships to prove that you deserve to be recognized as a new nation. Being recognized as a true nation means that there is political and economic stability within a country. The area where Somaliland is located is very unstable. Its parent nation, Somalia is very unstable. For example, in Somalia, there are pirates who hijack mariners and take them and the vessel hostage. Stability within a country is a major aspect for the international community to look at to recognize new countries.

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How People Around the World Take Exams

How People Around the World Take Exams | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Examinations, tests, assessments—whatever the nomenclature, it’s hard to imagine schooling without them. Testing is the most popular method of quantifying individuals’ knowledge, often with the intention of objectively measuring aptitude and ability. Test-taking is a dreaded experience that the country’s kids and young adults share with their counterparts across the globe. The ritual at its core doesn’t vary much: Students sit at a table or a computer desk (or sometimes, as shown below, on the floor), pencil and/or mouse in hand, the clock ticking away mercilessly."


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John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 7:34 AM

So we can see similarities in testing all over the world....but now we can see how we have to take a test in different fashion! Imagine taking an APHG test in these different ways! 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:58 AM

unit 3

careerpath12's curator insight, March 11, 1:10 AM

I am torn on how to teach these two ideas about cultures and societies all around the world:

People and cultures are different all over the world.People and cultures are the same all over the world.

Cultural practices are often so similar, are done in slight different fashion.  This photo gallery can create opportunities for our students to 'see' themselves in other cultures while at the same time seeing the richness of global cultural practices. 


Tags: education, K12, worldwide.