AP Human Geography
Follow
Find
1.4K views | +3 today
 
Scooped by Courtney Barrowman
onto AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Chicago green lights $1 lot purchase program

Chicago green lights $1 lot purchase program | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The city of Chicago is moving forward with its $1 lot purchase program, declaring the pilot effort a success even before lot sales have been finalized.
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 7

more...
No comment yet.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geography Soup

"A great resource full of great links to accompany the Geography Soup channel on Vimeo."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Course resource

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 3, 7:19 PM

Geography Soup is a Vimeo channel designed to include interesting videos that are laden with geographic content in them.  This powerpoint slideshow has resources designed to help you get the most flavor and substance out of these (and any other) video resources.  This is especially great for K-12 students, physical and regional geography.


Tags: K12, video.

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The world as it is: The influence of religion

The world as it is: The influence of religion | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Seldom has it been more important for Americans to form a realistic assessment of the world scene. But our current governing, college-­educated class suffers one glaring blind spot.

Modern American culture produces highly individualistic career and identity paths for upper- and middle-class males and females. Power couples abound, often sporting different last names. But deeply held religious identities and military loyalties are less common. Few educated Americans have any direct experience with large groups of men gathered in intense prayer or battle. Like other citizens of the globalized corporate/consumer culture, educated Americans are often widely traveled but not deeply rooted in obligation to a particular physical place, a faith or a kinship."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 3

more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, September 21, 12:45 PM

Other peoples, with different histories, cultures, etc, are not going to be like us.

 

Ever.

 

Period.

 

Might as well learn to accept that (and learn it in general) so that we do not invoke negative sentiments to develop.

 

 

MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 3:12 PM

APHG-U3

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 22, 11:57 AM

Religion and its influence

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why this Ebola outbreak became the worst we've ever seen

"The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more people than sum total of all the previous outbreaks since the virus was first identified in 1976. This video explains how it got so bad."  


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 1

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 10:07 PM

In a word, geography.  The geographic factors facilitated the diffusion of Ebola and have slowed down the preventative measure and limited their success.  This shows how porous borders, cultural patterns of health care, limited facilities a low literacy rates all contribute to to creating this nightmare.


Tags: medical, development, diffusion, Africa.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 18, 10:10 AM
Why this Ebola outbreak became the worst we've ever seen
Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

38 maps that explain the global economy

38 maps that explain the global economy | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Commerce knits the modern world together in a way that nothing else quite does. Almost anything you own these days is the result of a complicated web of global interactions. And there's no better way to depict those interactions than some maps.

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 6

more...
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 26, 11:04 AM

Mapas ...

Mr. Lavold's curator insight, September 28, 7:05 PM

Many ideological issues  relate to economics - and many economic issues related to geography. Take a look at these maps and see if they help you understand the global economy and where Canada fits in. Consider how different ideologies might view these maps and the data that they contain.

Maghfir Rafsan Jamal's curator insight, September 28, 10:45 PM

I find a treasure.. :D

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe

No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Birthrates across the Continent are falling at drastic and, to many, alarming rates. Why are Europeans so hesitant to have children, and what does it mean for their future and for ours?

 

Nice piece that show work well for understanding the demographic transition, which links population growth rates with levels of human development.


Via Kevin Suess, Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 2

more...
Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:28 AM

Amazing to see that the birth rates are so low in Europe.  When at one time there were soo many people that many of them were part of the huge immigration to the US in the 19th and early 20th century.  Now some of these nations are having worker shortages as their populations get older.  The result of this is workers from other countries moving into European countries to work and fill the jobs.  This in turn has led to racial tensions in some European countires where people are stating that the jobs are being taken by these foregin workers.  However, it is the people of these countries that have having fewer children, whether it be a lifestyle choice or just plain economic factors.  It becomes a circular argument eventaully.  Will there be a change in the birth rate in Europe?  Only time will tell, but by the looks of itm it is not going to be anytime soon.  

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 5:39 PM
That is very odd because usually it is the Europeans who want to have many kids. It seems that the Europeans are not so interested in having kids. They just want to enjoy their lives to the fullest. Not having kids could be a bad thing for the population. One reason would be the family genes would be gone because there are no more family members to keep it going. There is one good thing to the decrease of population, which are less people to care for in the world. But Europe should have seen this coming because there was at one point in time there were the most populated country now it has changed to the least populated who would have thought that would happen. But having kids is a great accomplishment that not everyone can have. Many people have disease that stop the production of having kids.
Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 7:14 PM

This is showing how in the future due to more woman's rights and better  education systems, woman are losing interest in having babies at an early age. Therefore the population in Europe is declining. 

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Cultural Patterns and Food

"Berlin Bureau Chief Michael Slackman looks into the obsession with currywurst, a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder, and brings different Berliners together."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 3

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 24, 8:43 AM

This short video has been added to the the interactive map, Place-Based Geography VideosThis depiction of street foods in German cities is a rich, tangible example to show cultural patterns and processes.  Currywurst is a unifying force across socioeconomic classes in Germany, but it is also a product of globalization and cultural interactions across regions.  Culture is not static and this New York Times video can be used to teach the various concepts of culture; per the updated APHG outline, the initial concepts of culture are:  

  • Culture traits
  • Diffusion patterns
  • Acculturation, assimilation and multiculturalism
  • Culture region, vernacular region, cultural hearth
  • Globalization and the effects of technology on culture.


Question to Ponder: How are these 5 major elements of culture seen in this video?


Tags: food, migration, culturediffusion, globalization, consumption, APHG.

Adriene Mannas's curator insight, September 25, 8:00 PM

Unit 1! Culture

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Scoop.it!

Most Commonly Spoken Language Other Than English or Spanish in Each State

Most Commonly Spoken Language Other Than English or Spanish in Each State | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Allison Anthony
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 3

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Scoop.it!

A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates

A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Dueling projections of population growth present different visions of the world's future.


Via Allison Anthony
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 2

more...
Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Stamford Hill council removes 'unacceptable' posters telling women which side of the road to walk down

Stamford Hill council removes 'unacceptable' posters telling women which side of the road to walk down | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A London council has removed “unacceptable” posters instructing women which side of the road they should walk down.

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 3

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 25, 1:07 PM

Part of this story is cultural misunderstandings, but I think that it is more than just that.  The signs were put up for an Orthodox Jewish street event; many in this community were shocked at the notion that anyone would attempt to regulate the use of space based on gender.  Some even put up protest signs saying, "women – please feel free to walk wherever you want…it’s 2014."

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 2

more...
Silvina Paricio Tato's curator insight, September 17, 12:42 PM

Via Javier Marrero Acosta

MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 3:16 PM

APHG-U2

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 11:17 PM

Unit 2

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Scoop.it!

2014 World Population Interactive Map


Via Allison Anthony
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 2

more...
Allison Anthony's curator insight, September 16, 4:42 PM

HOT off the press!  World Population Data Sheet.  Get yours today!

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Scoop.it!

Shocking Documentary Qatar's World Cup by ESPN E60 - YouTube

"Here is ESPN's shocking documentary on slave labor in Qatar."


Via Allison Anthony
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 2 migration and guest workers

more...
Allison Anthony's curator insight, September 14, 8:35 PM

Population/Migration unit and guest workers.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 16, 12:45 PM

Unit 2 Population/Migration

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from World Geography at Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Scoop.it!

How languages evolve - Alex Gendler

How languages evolve - Alex Gendler | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past.

Via Allison Anthony
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 3

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world

13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The transition from childhood to adulthood -- the 'coming of age' of boys who become young men and girls who become young women -- is a significant stepping stone in everyone’s life. But the age at which this happens, and how a child celebrates their rite of passage into adolescence, depends entirely on where they live and what culture they grow up in.  Looking back, we'll never forget the majesty that was prom, or the excitement of hitting the dance floor at our friends' co-ed Bar and Bat Mitzvah parties, and why should we? Embarassing or amazing, they were pivotal moments in our lives that deserve remembering. On that note, here are thirteen of it the world’s most diverse coming of age traditions."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, culture, indigenous, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 3

more...
Katrina Miller's curator insight, September 26, 1:24 AM

This article is particularly interesting because I've visited some of the locations where the coming of age practices originated. One this I think is important to note is that parts of China actually have coming of age ceremonies for both girls and boys (Ji Li and Guan Li). Other cultures, Central and South America for example, celebrate a girl's coming of age with a Quinceanera, but there is no such celebration for the males. What social implications might this make?

 

During a visit to the small village of Sultan Hammod in Kenya, quite close to Tanzania, I actually did not observe or hear of any coming of age traditions that the men partake in (drinking the mixture of cow's blood and alcohol). I wonder if the practice is carried on village by village, with some no longer participating?

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, September 26, 9:48 AM

This article is interesting in the sense that while marking your transition from childhood to adulthood is an important part into being initiated to society, it is one that also signifies the lack knowledge a child faces before being initiated. While some communities prepare the child for adulthood after their initiation ceremony, others leave the newly initiated to fend for themselves. A child spends several years preparing for their coming of age ceremony. In some communities, little teaching is given to what life is like after the ceremony's over. That's the problem with the Sweet Sixteen coming of age. Adolescents prepare for their sweet sixteen bash and are completely oblivious to the real challenges life has for them long term.

Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, September 29, 5:04 PM

Love seeing the many different traditions that people do when coming of age and also traditions in general. Growing up living in the United States my family still followed the many traditions they had where they came from. Both my parents are from Colombia and they brought down many of there family traditions and also world wide Spanish traditions also. For example, my sweet 15 was a very memorable tradition that many young Spanish girls have once they turn 15. Its a big celebration and festivities that are all very much traditional for us. Its interesting learning the traditions others have and learning about new places.

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 2

more...
Astienback J. Seb's curator insight, September 17, 5:47 AM

YOUNG AND POOR...

Silvina Paricio Tato's curator insight, September 17, 12:42 PM

Via Javier Marrero Acosta

MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 3:16 PM

APHG-U2

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Moving Argentina’s Capital From Buenos Aires Could Make Things Worse

Moving Argentina’s Capital From Buenos Aires Could Make Things Worse | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Argentina should be careful in considering the implications of the idea of moving the capital [from Buenos Aires] to Santiago del Estero. While a dramatic move might be appealing as a fresh start, it could end up aggravating the challenges of governing the country. Capitals, like flags, are symbols, but their choice has very real consequences."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 4

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 11, 2:22 PM

Countries occasionally choose to move their capital cities to a region of the country where they want to promote growth.  A new capital such as the one being considered in Argentina, would be called by geographers a forward capital.  Although that term is not used in the article, it is one of the few examples of a forward capital being discussed a news article and it nicely discusses some of the advantages and disadvantages of forward capitals and the impacts they can have of regional growth, regime stability and the political organization of space.  


Tagspolitical, governanceArgentinaSouth America, unit 4 political.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 3:15 PM

APHG-U4

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..".

Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..". | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

While global population now is almost reaching 7 billion, mainly to due high birth rates in the developing world, many of the more developed parts of Asia (and elsewhere) are facing shrinking population as fewer women are choosing to marry and have children. 

 

This is a very concrete way to discuss the Demographic Transition Model and population issues around the world.   Cultural values shifting, globalization and demographics all merge together in this issue. 


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 2

more...
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 3, 2011 8:05 PM
This is absolutely shocking! I never thought this was possible. It is even more shocking that it is so common within many countries and not just Hong Kong. The only two countries that seem to be in good standings are Canada and Brazil. All other 14 are at risk during the years 3000 to about 3050. Now due to this shrinking in female population then leading to just shrinking in population in general, wouldn't this then lead to a serious decrease in our global population and be for the better. Could this then mean more resources and less poverty? Although another idea that just came to mind, this situation would benefit India because they value males over females. The male is favored because they inherit land, pass on the family name, and financially provide for the parents. Overall this female population decline just merges a variety of concerns.
Robert Slone's curator insight, September 23, 8:40 AM

It is amazing how individual decisions can affect everything about the future,even the population of entire societies.

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

New Balance struggles as last major athletic shoe brand still manufacturing in U.S.

New Balance struggles as last major athletic shoe brand still manufacturing in U.S. | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Nike? Gone. Adidas? Gone. New Balance, the last major athletic shoe brand still manufacturing in the United States, fights to keep jobs here."   This is an excellent portal for discussing outsourcing, deindutrialization, sectors of the economy and globalization. 


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 6

more...
Stacey Jackson's comment, February 7, 2013 5:51 PM
I had no idea that New Balance still manufactured their shoes in the US. Sadly, I assumed they were made overseas as most textiles are these days. I'll have to go out and buy a pair of New Balances now.
Cam E's curator insight, January 29, 2:03 PM

The United States, known for its industrial prowess in the past, has become a shadow of what it used to be. Our economy has taken a major turn to a majority service oriented one, with about 70 percent of our GDP coming from Consumption rather than production. Even since the year 2000 the US has lost around 32 percent of its manufacturing jobs. All that can be said through my limited knowledge on the topic is that a nation which switches from production to consumption will likely fall behind others on the path of technological advancement.

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Which States Are in the Midwest?

Which States Are in the Midwest? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Here's a somewhat regular argument I get in: Which states make up which regions of the United States? Some of these regions -- the West Coast, Mountain States, Southwest and Northeast are pretty cl...

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 1 

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 2:58 PM

Vernacular regions aren't defined by a one particular trait, but are how we think about places.  These 'regions of the mind' are how we organize information about places, which is why these regions aren't sharp or precise.  In a similar article, they investigate what we consider to be a part of the South using similar crowdsourcing data. 

 

Tags: USA. regionsmapping.

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Scoop.it!

As World’s Population Booms, Will Its Resources Be Enough for Us?

As World’s Population Booms, Will Its Resources Be Enough for Us? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
As world population projections soar, there are rising concerns about the impact billions more people will have on the planet.

Via Allison Anthony
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 2

more...
Emily Bian's curator insight, September 28, 8:31 PM

The human impact on the environment is getting larger, and not in a good way, as you can tell from the picture. The rise from 1950 to 2011 is HUGE, compared to the rise from 1900 to 1950. Is there anything we can really do about it? Or do we just keep  going at the pace we are going, and just let things happen?

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Scoop.it!

How The Millennials May Save America

How The Millennials May Save America | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Millennials are the most populous generation in America. From a demographic perspective, this is very good news.


Via Allison Anthony
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 2

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

The Newest Countries in the world

The Newest Countries in the world | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Will Scotland follow the same fate as any of the other young nations in the world? Perhaps, but probably not. A glance down the list of the nine newest sovereign states below reveals that each situation is unique: It's hard to fully equate Scotland's situation with that of Slovakia, let alone with East Timor.

Even so, a glance back at history does show that the world's borders are changing more than we might appreciate: And the changes can sometimes take some time to settle."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 4

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 17, 8:58 AM

The recent histories of new countries getting started is important to reflect on as the world might get a new addition to this list. 

  1. South Sudan (July 2011)
  2. Kosovo (Feb 2008)
  3. Montenegro (June 2006)
  4. Serbia (June 2006)
  5. East Timor (May 2002)
  6. Palau (Oct 1994)
  7. Eritrea (Apr 1993)
  8. Czech Republic (Jan 1993)
  9. Slovakia (Jan 1993)
MsPerry's curator insight, September 18, 12:20 PM

APHG U4

Maghfir Rafsan Jamal's curator insight, September 29, 4:57 AM
The Newest Countries in the world
Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Scoop.it!

The Good Country Index

The Good Country Index | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Good Country Index is pretty simple: a measure of what each country on earth contributes to the common good of humanity

Via Allison Anthony
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 4

more...
Allison Anthony's curator insight, September 16, 4:56 PM

Cool look at some positive data for a change!

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Scoop.it!

Map: How the Ebola Outbreak Spread through Africa – Ebola Outbreak - FRONTLINE

Map: How the Ebola Outbreak Spread through Africa – Ebola Outbreak - FRONTLINE | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
From Patient Zero to today, here is a look back at how the West Africa Ebola outbreak grew to become the worst on record.

Via Allison Anthony
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 1 diffusion

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from World Geography at Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Scoop.it!

Scottish Independence: Animation on Scotland and the EU

Scottish Independence: Animation on Scotland and the EU | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"On 18 September there will be a referendum asking whether Scotland should be an independent country.  As the build-up to the vote continues, this animation takes a look at Scotland's relationship with the European Union."


Via Allison Anthony
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 4

more...
No comment yet.