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Tunisia's street artist

Tunisia's street artist | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Following the uprising that toppled the government in 2011, he has become a well known graffiti artist hoping to revive and modernise the ancient art of Arabic calligraphy in Tunisia. He calls his style "calligraffiti".


Via Seth Dixon
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unit 3

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Albert Jordan's curator insight, May 1, 2014 1:58 PM

Considering hip hop is a distinctly American born cultural phenomenon, this goes to show how something that was born of one nations deprived social class can leap to a nation that is very different and still put forth the same message, as well as be used in the same way. Just like in the Bronx when hip hop was just starting off it was used to get people together, in Tunisia it is being used in the same way. Graffiti itself, while seen by many as simple vandalism, can be a powerful symbol of social change. As this artist is doing, using themes from hip hop and taking old Arabic calligraphy, mixing these up and then applying them to the side of a prison which has personal as well as local symbolism - it goes to show that post Arab Spring some places are seeing real change.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 2, 2014 3:19 PM

Following the Arab Spring, Karim Jabbari is hoping to help rebuild and recreate Tunisia through his own form of cultural expression which he calls "calligraffiti".  Calligraffiti is a blend of Western Street art and North African Arabic calligraphy.  This artistic expression works to spread messages pertaining to the recreating of the social and political environment of the country and by attracting and empowering Tunisia's youth in this endeavor.  

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:24 PM

The video shows how Karim Jabbari, is able to combine folk culture (ancient arabic writing) in with the western graffiti art. He is able to use his art to express political ideals and beliefs

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Up on the Roof: Top-Floor Attractions Help Maximize Revenues - NYTimes.com

Up on the Roof: Top-Floor Attractions Help Maximize Revenues - NYTimes.com | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
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Unit 7
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The world reshaped

The world reshaped | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
In 2015 demographers, teachers and politicians will stop talking about the population pyramid and start referring to the population dome. The change in terminology...
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unit 2

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Animaniacs - Yakko's World - HIGH QUALITY - YouTube

great song to learn the countries, and you can combine to learn the nationalities
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

For fun and inspiration prior to the locational geography exam.

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Comparing the five major world religions

"It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths. John Bellaimey explains the intertwined histories and cultures of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam."


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unit 3

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MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:48 AM

APHG-Unit 3

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:13 AM

Great insight into our 5 major world religions.

Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, January 28, 12:06 PM

This is also a good introductory video for the Religion unit.  It will at least give students a general overview of the major world religions as a baseline of information to reference when diving deeper into the unit content.

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Prayer in Various Global Faiths

Prayer in Various Global Faiths | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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unit 3

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 20, 12:15 PM

See how people around the world pray...video examples of prayer and the cultural/spiritual significance are shown highlighting Buddhists, Mormons, and Sikhs.  Place is very important component to prayer for many and the 4th example shows how some use a labyrinth as a tool to commune with the divine.


Tags: religion, culture, Christianity, Buddhism.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 9:54 AM

unit 3

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The case for engineering our food

Pamela Ronald studies the genes that make plants more resistant to disease and stress. In an eye-opening talk, she describes her decade-long quest to help create a variety of rice that can survive prolonged flooding. She shows how the genetic improvement of seeds saved the Hawaiian papaya crop in the 1950s — and makes the case that it may simply be the most effective way to enhance food security for our planet’s growing population.


Tags: GMOs, technology, agriculture.


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unit 5

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MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:27 AM

Ag Unit

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 27, 12:57 PM

Pamela Ronald studies the genes that make plants more resistant to disease and stress. In an eye-opening talk, she describes her decade-long quest to help create a variety of rice that can survive prolonged flooding. She shows how the genetic improvement of seeds saved the Hawaiian papaya crop in the 1950s — and makes the case that it may simply be the most effective way to enhance food security for our planet’s growing population.

Jill Wallace's curator insight, May 30, 9:38 PM

Agriculture

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What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline

What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Picture this: Tourists visiting one of your city's most prominent attractions are unable to see it because of smog, haze and a bevy of other airborne pollutants. What's the solution?

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Summer reading KQ4: pollution, smog, megacity, sustainability

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Kendra King's curator insight, April 3, 7:43 PM

In the short term this might be a workable solution, but definitely not a long term one. To be clear, I think posing in front of a large representation of what the city should look like is ridiculous. There are still harmful pollutants surrounding the area and all the other pictures will show the reality of the situation. Honestly, one doesn’t need to stand in front of a poster showing what the city looked like, one could just superimpose the image of themselves from the comfort of their own home. Yet, tourists seem to be taking their pictures in front of the poster anyways without any regard for the environmental harm occurring the area. So on the other hand, I give points to the country for being creative enough to try and appease the tourist. I am not quite sure how much of their economy depends on tourism, but the fact that the country is dealing with a long term issue and still thought about how to make the most of it economically was a smart move on their part. Now, I will only continue to respect what Hong Kong does if their government actually steps up to the plate and starts regulating the boats that are causing “more pollution than… anticipated.” Also, I will actually say the solution is horrible if the use of this backdrop acts as an enabler (i.e. without pressure from a decrease in tourist, the country then decides not to regulate for the long term benefit of the country until later). It will be something interesting to watch over the next couple years. 

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 13, 11:55 AM

This article is a little sad. If you're traveling across the world and want to take pictures for memories, using a backdrop would not be the first thing that comes to mind. Tourists use a backdrop to show the Hong Kong skyline on a clear and sunny day because you have trouble seeing it most days due to all of the pollution. It's crazy that you cannot even take a picture of the actual skyline because the pollution is so bad. This temporary fix has overlooked that actual problem here. People are fascinated that they are being provided with an alternative of what it would look like but something should be done so that people can actually experience the real thing. This backdrop is putting a band-aid on the issue in the mean time but all of this pollution is not safe and something needs to be done to start fixing it. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 7:17 PM

Major cities in the world should take a deeper look into controlling pollution problems in their cities.  At some point, these places will no longer attract people to live in these areas, thus lowering the impact that these industries may have.  But as long as people are still living here by the millions and there is tourism, and buisness is booming, nothing will be done about the issue.

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River Meanders: Red River: Oklahoma-Texas Boundary

River Meanders: Red River: Oklahoma-Texas Boundary: It all comes down to ... Geography.

 

This natural and physical border is examined by @josephkerski.


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Unit 4: natural and physical boundaries

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Plate Tectonics and the Formation of Central America and the Caribbean

This animation is made from a time series of maps reconstructing the movements of continental crust or blocks, as South America pulled away from North America, starting 170 million years ago. Note that South America is still clinging to Africa at the beginning of the series.

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Summer reading KQ1

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 22, 4:37 PM

The land bridge connecting North and South America is hardly permanent (on a geological time scale that is).  This video is an animated version of the still maps from this article.  


Tags: Mexico, tectonicsphysical, video, Middle America.

Sameer Mohamed's curator insight, May 27, 8:54 AM

The intriguing thing about this video is that it puts into perspective the amount of time that humans have been on this earth. In in less than a million years we have gone from not existing to shaping the ground that we walk on.

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3 easy ways to tell if a viral photo is bogus

3 easy ways to tell if a viral photo is bogus | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Many people posting it wrote that the photo was taken during the recent Nepal earthquakes, and that it depicts 'a brother protecting his sister.' Pretty heartwarming, right? It’s the exact sort of thing your aunt would share on Facebook. A perfectly clear, resonant message about survival and empathy and inequality, all that good stuff.  There’s only one problem: That picture is fake."


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course resource, life resource :)

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MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:28 AM

Study Skills

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 27, 1:05 PM

This picture supposedly taken in Nepal of a brother protecting his younger sister due to recent earthquakes is, in fact, false. These kinds of photos portraying helpless people in foreign countries are often created to increase Instagram likes and retweets on twitter. Some times are real photos of someone or something going through tragedy, but often they are not.    

Wendy Zaruba's curator insight, June 2, 9:21 AM

This is a GREAT Tip for checking out all those sad stories you see on Facebook and Twitter.  Once again Thank You Google!!

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The 9 Worst-Designed Cities in the World

The 9 Worst-Designed Cities in the World | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"To get to the bottom of what qualifies as 'badly designed,' we picked the brains of several urban planners to highlight the flaws of some of the world's biggest cities. In the end, that birthed a list of nine cities that, for various reasons, are gigantic messes in some way or another."


On the list: Jakarta, Dubai, Atlanta, Naypyidaw, São Paulo, Boston, Brasilia, Missoula and Dhaka. 


Tags: urban, planning, urbanism.


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unit 7

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Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 5:46 AM

Reading about these different cities makes me cringe. Either the rich is priority, politicians are priority, or traffic is insane to the point going to the grocery store for milk will cost you two hours in traffic.

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 10:12 AM

Reflection of development. Sometimes commercialization in less developed or developing countries causes issues due to lack of finances when trying to industrialize the region. This poses problems such as the ones described in the article. 

christian's curator insight, May 27, 12:01 PM

Unit 6: urban land use 

This article is mainly about how bad some of the worlds urban areas are. The article shows and explains why they are bad and also why they were even designed in the way that they were. One example is Brasilia, which, was designed to have a population of 500,000, instead it has a population of about 3 million.

This article ties into unit 6 by showing some of the worst urban areas throughout the world. And also why they were even designed to be a CBD.

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First taste of chocolate

"To be honest I do not know what they make of my beans," says farmer N'Da Alphonse. "I've heard they're used as flavoring in cooking, but I've never seen it. I do not even know if it's true." Watch how the Dutch respond to a cocoa bean in return or you can watch our entire episode on chocolate here.


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Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 6 key concepts development, poverty, globalization, industry, labor

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:03 PM

It's interesting and fascinating to see how the workers that harvest the cocoa bean are so excited about the results of their hard work. Having grown up, our entire lives we have been exposed to chocolate and have taken it for granted, but seeing the men who gather the beans enjoy chocolate so much was cool because they did not know what the bean was being used for and seeing their hard work make something sweet is a nice surprise for them. Due to chocolate being expensive in Ivory Coast, the people can not enjoy the fruits of their labor as much as they would like, but shows how home grown products can't be enjoyed by those that make them.

Kendra King's curator insight, March 15, 6:30 PM

This is a reminder of how well off the past colonizers really are in comparison to the once colonized lands. When describing the chocolate some of the African workers called it “a precious gift” and a “privilege to taste.” Yet even I, a huge chocoholic, think both of those descriptions are extreme. My reaction to this stems solely from that fact that I am lucky enough to have what I think is a simple commodity in the United States. Really, the descriptions from the farmers probably isn’t that far off since they never ate it before. Hearing their reactions though was just a bit it is actually a bit sad. They handle a part of the produce every day, but never knew what it was like. Now that the farmers know it is going to be bitter sweet as well. On the one hand, they had the pleasure of knowing. However, they probably won’t have an opportunity to eat the chocolate ever again give how expensive and rare it is in their country. I wonder of many years from now, the Ivory Coast will ever be able to raise the standard of living within the country enough so that chocolate will one day be seen as common place? 

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 9:24 AM

It is inconceivable that these farmers did not know what the end product was. A little suspicious of the lack of knowledge given the relative ease of access to the internet. the point is still valid as the real factor here is the inputs of labor being so inexpensive. In class last week, we learned that Africa is by far the youngest continent in the world and thus is ripe for exploitation of young and plentiful labor. Seems Africa can't win when it comes to slavery; from the exportation of slaves to the Americas and Europe in the late 1700's to mid 1800's to colonization efforts by Britain and other nations they can't catch a break. I love my chocolate and will not stop purchasing it. That is not the issue. The issue is slave labor and corrupt governments that support this problem. The Ivory Coast is aptly named; white supremacy at it's core....

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Fantasy frontiers

Fantasy frontiers | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
South-Asian territorial claims Current boundariesPakistan’s claimChina’s claimIndia’s claim Source: The Economist Source: The Economist Source: The Economist...
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unit 4 key concept: boundaries

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Texan tug-of-war

Texan tug-of-war | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
More annexation on the horizon ALAMO RANCH, at the edge of San Antonio’s outer ring road, is hardly a glamorous place. New strip malls stretch along access roads;...
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Unit 7
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Abandoned Athens Olympic 2004 venues, 10 years on – in pictures

Abandoned Athens Olympic 2004 venues, 10 years on – in pictures | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A decade after Greece hosted the world’s greatest sporting extravaganza, many of its once-gleaming Olympic venues now lie abandoned
Courtney Barrowman's insight:
Unit 6-7, Reminds me of "development" pics from Brazil and the World Cup, maybe we should reconsider calling it "winning" the bid to host?!
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Why do competitors open their stores next to one another?

"Why are all the gas stations, cafes and restaurants in one crowded spot? As two competitive cousins vie for ice-cream-selling domination on one small beach, discover how game theory and the Nash Equilibrium inform these retail hotspots."


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unit 6

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:56 PM

APHG-U6

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 8:03 PM

For use in understanding the placement of businesses in Human Geography.

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 2014 3:34 AM

A great video lesson that gets at the heart of location theory and competition.

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'Love locks' to be removed from Paris bridge

'Love locks' to be removed from Paris bridge | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The city of Paris will start removing padlocks from the Pont des Arts on Monday, effectively ending the tourist tradition of attaching 'love locks' to the bridge. For years, visitors have been attaching locks with sentimental messages to the bridge in symbolic acts of affection. Some further seal the deal by throwing keys into the Seine River below.  It was considered charming at first, but the thrill wore off as sections of fencing on the Pont des Arts crumbled under the locks' weight. The bridge carries more than 700,000 locks with an estimated combined weight roughly the same as 20 elephants."


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unit 1

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Leslie G Perry's curator insight, June 2, 8:32 AM

I LOVE Seth Dixon's insight on this and how it figures in with Design Technology. What mark do we leave and why? What are the unintended consequences of leaving out mark?

 

Seth Dixon's insight:

Graffiti, tombstones, love locks, monuments...each of these are manifestations of people's desire to have some tangible impact on the landscape.  Something that manifests a connection to place in a profoundly personal way. 

 

Questions to Ponder: Why do people want leave a mark on places that are meaningful to them?  When do you think that they that these markers are appropriate or inappropriate?  Do we have more of a 'right' to mark some places than others? Why do many oppose these personal marks on the landscape?

Linda Denty's curator insight, June 4, 8:32 PM

Great discussion point for your classes!  As Seth Dixon says why do people choose to leave a mark on certain places and is this appropriate?  Could people be doing something else that doesn't have such a deleterious effect on it's environment?  

CMuddGeo's curator insight, June 7, 6:29 PM

This is understandable but very sad...

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On the trail of Myanmar's Rohingya migrants

On the trail of Myanmar's Rohingya migrants | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Jonah Fisher has been to Rakhine state in Myanmar to meet Rohingya migrants who are being forced to return home - but at a cost.

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unit 2

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 24, 10:08 PM

The Rohingya that are in the news lately are refugees on boats that everyone agrees that SOMEONE should help, but that no country in Southeast Asia wants to bring in. 


Tags: migration, political, refugeesBurma, Southeast Asia.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:29 AM

Migration

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22+ International Borders Around The World

22+ International Borders Around The World | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
History (and sometimes, unfortunately, current events) shows us just how easily national borders can change, but we still like to think that they are permanent fixtures. These photos of different national borders around the world show you how both friendly and hostile nations like to fence off their turf.

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Unit 4

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 29, 11:53 AM

Borders can make for some striking manifestations of power on the landscape.  On the other hand as seen in this picture of Slovakia, Austria and Hungary, friendship and cooperation can also be inscribed into the landscape.  There are some great teaching images in this gallery. 



Tags: border, political, territoriality, sovereignty,  images, land use, landscape.

Level343's curator insight, June 1, 3:00 PM

Now that's cool!!

Dwane Burke's curator insight, June 3, 6:16 PM

What do these say about the world?

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Geography of a Pencil

Geography of a Pencil | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Students map the origins of a pencil, predict and map trade and transport networks, and relate what they learn to globalization.
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

summer reading KQ3,: key concepts globalization, transportation

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Stunning Satellite Images of Earth

Stunning Satellite Images of Earth | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Exclusive timelapse: See climate change, deforestation and urban sprawl unfold as Earth evolves over 30 years.

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Courtney Barrowman's insight:

summer work KQ2 key concepts: remote sensing, deforestation, desertification, land use, geospatial

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Tracy Young's curator insight, May 12, 2013 6:12 PM

Very useful visual tool for exploring patterns of change

oyndrila's curator insight, May 17, 2013 1:24 PM

Exciting!!

Ishola Adebayo's comment, July 31, 2013 9:07 AM
good day Sir, pls need help on fixing scan line errors on lansat7 ETM images from 2003 using for example ArcMap9.3 or ENVI4.5 or.........thank you so much
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How Suburban Are Big American Cities?

How Suburban Are Big American Cities? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"What, exactly, is a city? Technically, cities are legal designations that, under state laws, have specific public powers and functions. But many of the largest American cities — especially in the South and West — don’t feel like cities, at least not in the high-rise-and-subways, 'Sesame Street' sense. Large swaths of many big cities are residential neighborhoods of single-family homes, as car-dependent as any suburb.

Cities like Austin and Fort Worth in Texas and Charlotte, North Carolina, are big and growing quickly, but largely suburban. According to Census Bureau data released Thursday, the population of the country’s biggest cities (the 34 with at least 500,000 residents) grew 0.99 percent in 2014 — versus 0.88 percent for all metropolitan areas and 0.75 percent for the U.S. overall. But city growth isn’t the same as urban growth. Three cities of the largest 10 are more suburban than urban, based on our analysis of how people describe the neighborhoods where they live."


Tags: urban, suburbs, housing, sprawl, planning, density.


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unit 7

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Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 26, 11:56 PM

Suburbanization in the United States has been a phenomenon for the past 60 or so years, and continues on to this day with massive highway transport systems centered around cars. Its no surprise with cheap suburban land and relatively easy commutes that many of the fastest growing cities in the US are seeing their growth largely in suburban areas, where many more people can afford to live than the big city.

Sammie Bryant's curator insight, May 27, 12:07 AM

This article accurately depicts the difference between a normal city 50 years ago and a city today, as well as the continuing spread of suburbanization. For example, Austin, the capital of texas, a hustling, bustling always busy area, is predominantly suburban. As cities and countries continue to advance and develop and its citizens become more successful and family oriented, suburban homes for families will become more needed than something smaller, like condos or studio apartments. As the needs of the cities change, the structure of the city changes as well. This applies to our final unit of APHUG: Cities and Urban Land Use.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:29 AM

Urbanization

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Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia

Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The purpose-built city of Naypyidaw – unveiled a decade ago this year – boasts 20-lane highways, golf courses, fast Wi-Fi and reliable electricity. The only thing it doesn’t seem to have is people, report Matt Kennard and Claire Provost

 

Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, urban, urbanism.


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unit 7 key concepts: urban, urbanism, forward capital

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 4:35 PM

This was an interesting idea.  But it has not quite accomplished what they wanted.  Maybe they needed to build some businesses to draw the working class and middle class.  Otherwise, who wants to be in an area with no action.  

Campbell Ingraham's curator insight, May 25, 3:42 PM

This article talks about the strange city of Naypyidaw, Burma. Burma is a poor country in South east Asia, but right in the middle of the country is a huge developed city with 20-lane highways, golf courses, and Wi-Fi access. The only problem is that it has a deficiency of population. Barely anybody lives in this city, the streets are almost always empty, and happiness is low for the people who do live here. This city is 6 times the size of New York with barely a fraction of the population. 

 

This article relates to Variations in levels of development. It shows how poorer countries such as Burma use their money in inefficient ways to develop cities like Naypyidaw, while they only use 0.4% of their GDP to citizen health care. Barely anyone lives in this massive city, so it is obvious that this city has been a waste of money and resources, and doesn't stop the uneven development of Burma.

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 10:14 AM

Such a high luxury city, people in developing Burma cannot afford to live in this master planned community. This causes the company that produced it to lose a lot of money, due to the high amount they put into the project and the lack of response from the people of Burma.

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Gender Empowerment and Education

"In this exclusive, unedited interview, 'I Am Malala' author Malala Yousafzai remembers the Taliban's rise to power in her Pakistani hometown and discusses her efforts to campaign for equal access to education for girls. Malala Yousafzai also offers suggestions for people looking to help out overseas and stresses the importance of education."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 3 or 6

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analise moreno's curator insight, October 14, 2014 8:01 PM

This was one of our focuses last chapter. I totally agree with this because woman and as well as men deserve education they need education to have a successful life. I like how she describes this so well and thoroughly she talks about what she wants and needs in her life.

Cade Bruce's curator insight, March 19, 7:35 PM

This goes under the category of gender because she talks about how in Pakistan, many girls were not allowed an education. This relates to our studies on gender equality in different cultures by talking about the inequalities in Pakistan education for women. And especially reminds me of the seminar we had where we discussed what we should do to benefit gender equality, because she suggested what we should do, and that education should be assured.

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 8:42 PM

Summary: In this interview, Jon Stewart talks with Malala Yousafzai, a girl who outwardly fought for women's education, and in doing so, was shot by the Taliban. Even now, she continues to fight for women's equality and their right to education, after she won her Nobel Peace Prize. 

 

Insight: In this interview, the main topic is gender equality, and how it can lead to better education for women, which, in turn, gives women more power. Although developed countries, especially in Western Europe, already display high gender equality, more developing countries, especially in the Middle East, have hardly anything close to gender equality. Even with low amounts of gender equality, people like Malala and advocates in Western countries are striving towards this goal of gender equality.

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The Greatest Invention?

"What was the greatest invention of the industrial revolution? Hans Rosling makes the case for the washing machine. With newly designed graphics from Gapminder, Rosling shows us the magic that pops up when economic growth and electricity turn a boring wash day into an intellectual day of reading."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 6 key concepts: industrialization, development, technology  

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Bibhya Sharma's curator insight, October 27, 2014 7:32 PM

unarguably one of the greatest inventions of mankind.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 4:05 PM

unit 6

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 10:23 AM

Washing machine, the greatest invention of the industrial revolution. Hans Rosling further proves this point, highlighting many aspects of how industrialization not only changed the economy, but the people.