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A Map of Baseball Nation

A Map of Baseball Nation | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Fans may not list which team they favor on the census, but millions of them do make their preferences public on Facebook. Using aggregated data provided by the company, we were able to create an unprecedented look at the geography of baseball fandom, going down not only to the county level, as Facebook did in a nationwide map it released a few weeks ago, but also to ZIP codes."


Via Seth Dixon
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unit 1 & 3

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Greg Russak's curator insight, April 29, 2014 12:53 PM

Maps and baseball - a good combination!

Wyatt Wolf's curator insight, October 30, 2014 7:46 PM

My favorite baseball team is the Philadelphia Phillies, here's everyone else's.

Global Speechwriter's comment, November 4, 2014 2:52 AM
Jays? C'mon.

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What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline

What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Picture this: Tourists visiting one of your city's most prominent attractions are unable to see it because of smog, haze and a bevy of other airborne pollutants. What's the solution?

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Summer reading KQ4: pollution, smog, megacity, sustainability

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Kendra King's curator insight, April 3, 7:43 PM

In the short term this might be a workable solution, but definitely not a long term one. To be clear, I think posing in front of a large representation of what the city should look like is ridiculous. There are still harmful pollutants surrounding the area and all the other pictures will show the reality of the situation. Honestly, one doesn’t need to stand in front of a poster showing what the city looked like, one could just superimpose the image of themselves from the comfort of their own home. Yet, tourists seem to be taking their pictures in front of the poster anyways without any regard for the environmental harm occurring the area. So on the other hand, I give points to the country for being creative enough to try and appease the tourist. I am not quite sure how much of their economy depends on tourism, but the fact that the country is dealing with a long term issue and still thought about how to make the most of it economically was a smart move on their part. Now, I will only continue to respect what Hong Kong does if their government actually steps up to the plate and starts regulating the boats that are causing “more pollution than… anticipated.” Also, I will actually say the solution is horrible if the use of this backdrop acts as an enabler (i.e. without pressure from a decrease in tourist, the country then decides not to regulate for the long term benefit of the country until later). It will be something interesting to watch over the next couple years. 

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 13, 11:55 AM

This article is a little sad. If you're traveling across the world and want to take pictures for memories, using a backdrop would not be the first thing that comes to mind. Tourists use a backdrop to show the Hong Kong skyline on a clear and sunny day because you have trouble seeing it most days due to all of the pollution. It's crazy that you cannot even take a picture of the actual skyline because the pollution is so bad. This temporary fix has overlooked that actual problem here. People are fascinated that they are being provided with an alternative of what it would look like but something should be done so that people can actually experience the real thing. This backdrop is putting a band-aid on the issue in the mean time but all of this pollution is not safe and something needs to be done to start fixing it. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 7:17 PM

Major cities in the world should take a deeper look into controlling pollution problems in their cities.  At some point, these places will no longer attract people to live in these areas, thus lowering the impact that these industries may have.  But as long as people are still living here by the millions and there is tourism, and buisness is booming, nothing will be done about the issue.

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River Meanders: Red River: Oklahoma-Texas Boundary

River Meanders: Red River: Oklahoma-Texas Boundary: It all comes down to ... Geography.

 

This natural and physical border is examined by @josephkerski.


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Unit 4: natural and physical boundaries

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Plate Tectonics and the Formation of Central America and the Caribbean

This animation is made from a time series of maps reconstructing the movements of continental crust or blocks, as South America pulled away from North America, starting 170 million years ago. Note that South America is still clinging to Africa at the beginning of the series.

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Summer reading KQ1

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 22, 4:37 PM

The land bridge connecting North and South America is hardly permanent (on a geological time scale that is).  This video is an animated version of the still maps from this article.  


Tags: Mexico, tectonicsphysical, video, Middle America.

Sameer Mohamed's curator insight, May 27, 8:54 AM

The intriguing thing about this video is that it puts into perspective the amount of time that humans have been on this earth. In in less than a million years we have gone from not existing to shaping the ground that we walk on.

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3 easy ways to tell if a viral photo is bogus

3 easy ways to tell if a viral photo is bogus | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Many people posting it wrote that the photo was taken during the recent Nepal earthquakes, and that it depicts 'a brother protecting his sister.' Pretty heartwarming, right? It’s the exact sort of thing your aunt would share on Facebook. A perfectly clear, resonant message about survival and empathy and inequality, all that good stuff.  There’s only one problem: That picture is fake."


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Courtney Barrowman's insight:

course resource, life resource :)

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Allan Tsuda's curator insight, May 26, 7:43 PM

Nice tip.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:28 AM

Study Skills

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 27, 1:05 PM

This picture supposedly taken in Nepal of a brother protecting his younger sister due to recent earthquakes is, in fact, false. These kinds of photos portraying helpless people in foreign countries are often created to increase Instagram likes and retweets on twitter. Some times are real photos of someone or something going through tragedy, but often they are not.    

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The 9 Worst-Designed Cities in the World

The 9 Worst-Designed Cities in the World | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"To get to the bottom of what qualifies as 'badly designed,' we picked the brains of several urban planners to highlight the flaws of some of the world's biggest cities. In the end, that birthed a list of nine cities that, for various reasons, are gigantic messes in some way or another."


On the list: Jakarta, Dubai, Atlanta, Naypyidaw, São Paulo, Boston, Brasilia, Missoula and Dhaka. 


Tags: urban, planning, urbanism.


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unit 7

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Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 5:46 AM

Reading about these different cities makes me cringe. Either the rich is priority, politicians are priority, or traffic is insane to the point going to the grocery store for milk will cost you two hours in traffic.

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 10:12 AM

Reflection of development. Sometimes commercialization in less developed or developing countries causes issues due to lack of finances when trying to industrialize the region. This poses problems such as the ones described in the article. 

christian's curator insight, May 27, 12:01 PM

Unit 6: urban land use 

This article is mainly about how bad some of the worlds urban areas are. The article shows and explains why they are bad and also why they were even designed in the way that they were. One example is Brasilia, which, was designed to have a population of 500,000, instead it has a population of about 3 million.

This article ties into unit 6 by showing some of the worst urban areas throughout the world. And also why they were even designed to be a CBD.

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First taste of chocolate

"To be honest I do not know what they make of my beans," says farmer N'Da Alphonse. "I've heard they're used as flavoring in cooking, but I've never seen it. I do not even know if it's true." Watch how the Dutch respond to a cocoa bean in return or you can watch our entire episode on chocolate here.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 6 key concepts development, poverty, globalization, industry, labor

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:03 PM

It's interesting and fascinating to see how the workers that harvest the cocoa bean are so excited about the results of their hard work. Having grown up, our entire lives we have been exposed to chocolate and have taken it for granted, but seeing the men who gather the beans enjoy chocolate so much was cool because they did not know what the bean was being used for and seeing their hard work make something sweet is a nice surprise for them. Due to chocolate being expensive in Ivory Coast, the people can not enjoy the fruits of their labor as much as they would like, but shows how home grown products can't be enjoyed by those that make them.

Kendra King's curator insight, March 15, 6:30 PM

This is a reminder of how well off the past colonizers really are in comparison to the once colonized lands. When describing the chocolate some of the African workers called it “a precious gift” and a “privilege to taste.” Yet even I, a huge chocoholic, think both of those descriptions are extreme. My reaction to this stems solely from that fact that I am lucky enough to have what I think is a simple commodity in the United States. Really, the descriptions from the farmers probably isn’t that far off since they never ate it before. Hearing their reactions though was just a bit it is actually a bit sad. They handle a part of the produce every day, but never knew what it was like. Now that the farmers know it is going to be bitter sweet as well. On the one hand, they had the pleasure of knowing. However, they probably won’t have an opportunity to eat the chocolate ever again give how expensive and rare it is in their country. I wonder of many years from now, the Ivory Coast will ever be able to raise the standard of living within the country enough so that chocolate will one day be seen as common place? 

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 9:24 AM

It is inconceivable that these farmers did not know what the end product was. A little suspicious of the lack of knowledge given the relative ease of access to the internet. the point is still valid as the real factor here is the inputs of labor being so inexpensive. In class last week, we learned that Africa is by far the youngest continent in the world and thus is ripe for exploitation of young and plentiful labor. Seems Africa can't win when it comes to slavery; from the exportation of slaves to the Americas and Europe in the late 1700's to mid 1800's to colonization efforts by Britain and other nations they can't catch a break. I love my chocolate and will not stop purchasing it. That is not the issue. The issue is slave labor and corrupt governments that support this problem. The Ivory Coast is aptly named; white supremacy at it's core....

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Fantasy frontiers

Fantasy frontiers | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
South-Asian territorial claims Current boundariesPakistan’s claimChina’s claimIndia’s claim Source: The Economist Source: The Economist Source: The Economist...
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unit 4 key concept: boundaries

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Obama Issues Warning On The Risks Of Climate Change

Obama Issues Warning On The Risks Of Climate Change | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
By Roberta Rampton NEW LONDON, Connecticut, May 20 (Reuters) - Rising seas and thawing permafrost caused by warmer global temperatures threaten U.S. military bases and will
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Summer reading KQ4: What policies are being adopted in response to environmental change?

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Desalination: Could One Of California's Drought Solutions Backfire?

Desalination: Could One Of California's Drought Solutions Backfire? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
By FOX News Radio's Jessica Rosenthal in California

The obvious solution to California's drought is water. A lot of it.

A NASA analysis late last year found the state needs 11 trillion gallons to get out of the drought. And if it's not coming from the sky, water agencies, politi
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Summer reading KQ3: What are the major factors contributing to environmental change today?

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Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt?

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

As the climate shifts, rivers will both flood and dry up more often, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Shortages are especially likely in parts of the world already strapped for water, so political scientists expect feuds will become even more intense. To track disputes worldwide, researchers at Oregon State University spent a decade building a comprehensive database of international exchanges—-both conflicts and alliances—over shared water resources. They found that countries often begin disputes belligerently but ultimately reach peaceful agreements. Says Aaron Wolf, the geographer who leads the project, “For me the really interesting part is how even Arabs and Israelis, Indians and Pakistanis, are able to resolve their differences and find a solution.”


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

summer reading KQ2: How have humans altered the Earth's environment?  Water Security

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Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, June 19, 2014 9:44 AM

El bien más preciado.  El recurso agotable más subvalorado del planeta. 

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 20, 2014 2:50 PM

Questões políticas... 

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, June 21, 2014 11:01 AM

Add water to geography education curriculum? You better believe it. The crisis of the 21st century is and will be water.  

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Changing Earth

Changing Earth | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Over the years, ISS astronauts have had a rare opportunity to witness climate change on Earth from space.
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Summer reading KQ4, What policies are being adopted in response to environmental change?

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Declining Populations

Declining Populations | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"All over the continent, potential parents have shown reluctance to have more babies. Hence, governments and advocacy groups are becoming increasingly creative about getting their citizens to make babies."

 

Tag: Europe, declining populations, population, demographic transition model.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 2

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Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 10:11 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This article is about declining population being a problem in many highly developed European countries, and measures that administrations are going through in these countries to promote population growth. In Denmark during sex ed, children are not only taught how to be safe and use contraceptives, but also the benefits of having children as a way to encourage this. Sweden compensates both moms and dads for staying at home with their new born children for up to a year, and it is very cheap to raise a child in France.

 

All of these measures relate to saving declining populations through government promotions to raise the population. This shows that not only rising populations are an issue to account for, but falling ones as well. 

Megan Becker's curator insight, May 26, 11:41 PM

Summary: This article touches on the methods that several different European countries have tried to create a population growth by convincing the public to have more children. From TV ads, to discount prices for children, these countries try several methods to aid in their countries population crisis. 

 

Insight: This is an extremely odd article, in that the European ideas to grow populations are somewhat unconventional and strange. The Danish dating website made only for people who want to have children struck me as especially strange, in the new couples in the US don't even talk about children until way into the relationship. It relates to unit 2 in that it shows European population growth and decline, which eventually can lead to economic instability. 

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 12:53 PM

Effects of national population policies: promoting population growth in some countries or reducing fertility rates in others-

This article explains how Europe's population is starting to run lower and lower, so governments are trying to get people to have more children. In fact, the government is doing as much as they can without intervening with the families.

This article shows effects of national population policies: promoting population growth in some countries  by showing how some countries populations are declining, and the government is doing everything they can to get the fertility rate up again.

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Mapping Migration in the United States

Mapping Migration in the United States | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
An interactive map showing nationwide migration patterns in the United States since 1900.

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 2

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Alexa Earl's curator insight, May 26, 7:10 PM

This map shows migration patterns in the US. This goes along perfectly with migration in the US and it shows how it changes. This map shows the migration slow in and out.

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 10:04 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This article features a map that displays migration within the US. The map showcases data about the percentage of people in each state that were born there, and then the smaller sections within the state show the percentages of people that have migrated there from other states. This shows the nationwide migration patterns of the US in the last 100 years, and which states have the most migration in  and out of them.

 

This showcases a particular type of migration called internal migration, as it all takes place within the borders of the US. 

Megan Becker's curator insight, May 26, 11:01 PM

Summary: This interactive map from the New York Times shows where people in each state are born, highlighting the growing internal migration in the United States alone. For example, only a small percentage of people living in Florida were actually born there, while the majority of Louisiana residents were born there.

 

Insight: I think this is an interesting map mostly because of it's interactive feature, in that you can see how internal migration has drastically changed since 1900. It relates to unit 2 in that migration patterns are always changing, whether they be internal or external. 

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Geography of a Pencil

Geography of a Pencil | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Students map the origins of a pencil, predict and map trade and transport networks, and relate what they learn to globalization.
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

summer reading KQ3,: key concepts globalization, transportation

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Stunning Satellite Images of Earth

Stunning Satellite Images of Earth | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Exclusive timelapse: See climate change, deforestation and urban sprawl unfold as Earth evolves over 30 years.

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

summer work KQ2 key concepts: remote sensing, deforestation, desertification, land use, geospatial

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Tracy Young's curator insight, May 12, 2013 6:12 PM

Very useful visual tool for exploring patterns of change

oyndrila's curator insight, May 17, 2013 1:24 PM

Exciting!!

Ishola Adebayo's comment, July 31, 2013 9:07 AM
good day Sir, pls need help on fixing scan line errors on lansat7 ETM images from 2003 using for example ArcMap9.3 or ENVI4.5 or.........thank you so much
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How Suburban Are Big American Cities?

How Suburban Are Big American Cities? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"What, exactly, is a city? Technically, cities are legal designations that, under state laws, have specific public powers and functions. But many of the largest American cities — especially in the South and West — don’t feel like cities, at least not in the high-rise-and-subways, 'Sesame Street' sense. Large swaths of many big cities are residential neighborhoods of single-family homes, as car-dependent as any suburb.

Cities like Austin and Fort Worth in Texas and Charlotte, North Carolina, are big and growing quickly, but largely suburban. According to Census Bureau data released Thursday, the population of the country’s biggest cities (the 34 with at least 500,000 residents) grew 0.99 percent in 2014 — versus 0.88 percent for all metropolitan areas and 0.75 percent for the U.S. overall. But city growth isn’t the same as urban growth. Three cities of the largest 10 are more suburban than urban, based on our analysis of how people describe the neighborhoods where they live."


Tags: urban, suburbs, housing, sprawl, planning, density.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 7

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Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 26, 11:56 PM

Suburbanization in the United States has been a phenomenon for the past 60 or so years, and continues on to this day with massive highway transport systems centered around cars. Its no surprise with cheap suburban land and relatively easy commutes that many of the fastest growing cities in the US are seeing their growth largely in suburban areas, where many more people can afford to live than the big city.

Sammie Bryant's curator insight, May 27, 12:07 AM

This article accurately depicts the difference between a normal city 50 years ago and a city today, as well as the continuing spread of suburbanization. For example, Austin, the capital of texas, a hustling, bustling always busy area, is predominantly suburban. As cities and countries continue to advance and develop and its citizens become more successful and family oriented, suburban homes for families will become more needed than something smaller, like condos or studio apartments. As the needs of the cities change, the structure of the city changes as well. This applies to our final unit of APHUG: Cities and Urban Land Use.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:29 AM

Urbanization

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Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia

Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The purpose-built city of Naypyidaw – unveiled a decade ago this year – boasts 20-lane highways, golf courses, fast Wi-Fi and reliable electricity. The only thing it doesn’t seem to have is people, report Matt Kennard and Claire Provost

 

Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, urban, urbanism.


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Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 7 key concepts: urban, urbanism, forward capital

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 4:35 PM

This was an interesting idea.  But it has not quite accomplished what they wanted.  Maybe they needed to build some businesses to draw the working class and middle class.  Otherwise, who wants to be in an area with no action.  

Campbell Ingraham's curator insight, May 25, 3:42 PM

This article talks about the strange city of Naypyidaw, Burma. Burma is a poor country in South east Asia, but right in the middle of the country is a huge developed city with 20-lane highways, golf courses, and Wi-Fi access. The only problem is that it has a deficiency of population. Barely anybody lives in this city, the streets are almost always empty, and happiness is low for the people who do live here. This city is 6 times the size of New York with barely a fraction of the population. 

 

This article relates to Variations in levels of development. It shows how poorer countries such as Burma use their money in inefficient ways to develop cities like Naypyidaw, while they only use 0.4% of their GDP to citizen health care. Barely anyone lives in this massive city, so it is obvious that this city has been a waste of money and resources, and doesn't stop the uneven development of Burma.

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 10:14 AM

Such a high luxury city, people in developing Burma cannot afford to live in this master planned community. This causes the company that produced it to lose a lot of money, due to the high amount they put into the project and the lack of response from the people of Burma.

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Gender Empowerment and Education

"In this exclusive, unedited interview, 'I Am Malala' author Malala Yousafzai remembers the Taliban's rise to power in her Pakistani hometown and discusses her efforts to campaign for equal access to education for girls. Malala Yousafzai also offers suggestions for people looking to help out overseas and stresses the importance of education."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 3 or 6

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analise moreno's curator insight, October 14, 2014 8:01 PM

This was one of our focuses last chapter. I totally agree with this because woman and as well as men deserve education they need education to have a successful life. I like how she describes this so well and thoroughly she talks about what she wants and needs in her life.

Cade Bruce's curator insight, March 19, 7:35 PM

This goes under the category of gender because she talks about how in Pakistan, many girls were not allowed an education. This relates to our studies on gender equality in different cultures by talking about the inequalities in Pakistan education for women. And especially reminds me of the seminar we had where we discussed what we should do to benefit gender equality, because she suggested what we should do, and that education should be assured.

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 8:42 PM

Summary: In this interview, Jon Stewart talks with Malala Yousafzai, a girl who outwardly fought for women's education, and in doing so, was shot by the Taliban. Even now, she continues to fight for women's equality and their right to education, after she won her Nobel Peace Prize. 

 

Insight: In this interview, the main topic is gender equality, and how it can lead to better education for women, which, in turn, gives women more power. Although developed countries, especially in Western Europe, already display high gender equality, more developing countries, especially in the Middle East, have hardly anything close to gender equality. Even with low amounts of gender equality, people like Malala and advocates in Western countries are striving towards this goal of gender equality.

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The Greatest Invention?

"What was the greatest invention of the industrial revolution? Hans Rosling makes the case for the washing machine. With newly designed graphics from Gapminder, Rosling shows us the magic that pops up when economic growth and electricity turn a boring wash day into an intellectual day of reading."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 6 key concepts: industrialization, development, technology  

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Bibhya Sharma's curator insight, October 27, 2014 7:32 PM

unarguably one of the greatest inventions of mankind.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 4:05 PM

unit 6

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 10:23 AM

Washing machine, the greatest invention of the industrial revolution. Hans Rosling further proves this point, highlighting many aspects of how industrialization not only changed the economy, but the people.

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In One Photo, the Pope Does What Many World Leaders Haven't Had the Guts For

In One Photo, the Pope Does What Many World Leaders Haven't Had the Guts For | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The pope made an unexpected stop during his trip to the Holy Land, and his powerful gesture is making headlines across the globe.
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unit 3

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Smog remains as Olympics loom - Video on NBCNews.com

Video on msnbc.com: July 27: Chinese officials have spent a staggering amount of money preparing for the Olympics, but Beijing’s lingering pollution problem could distract from the games and hinder athletes. NBC’s Mark Mullen reports.
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Summer reading KQ4: What policies are being adopted in response to environmental change? key concepts: pollution, smog, sustainability, development  

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Californians get their drought-parched lawns painted green

Californians get their drought-parched lawns painted green | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
David Bartlett, owner of Xtreme Green Grass in West Sacramento, Calif. paints lawns green, a service that's shot up in popularity as the state's drought mandates water cutbacks.
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Summer reading KQ2; How Humans have altered Earth's Environment? Water

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Welcome to the Anthropocene

"A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. The film charts the growth of humanity into a global force on the equivalent scale to major geological processes."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Summer reading KQ1: How has the Earth's environment changed over time?

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, September 22, 2014 9:28 AM

More climate considerations

Olga Boldina's curator insight, September 24, 2014 10:39 AM

добавить свой понимание ...

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, September 24, 2014 11:55 AM

El Antropoceno,  nueva era geológica

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Why Geography?

Why Geography? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Geography. It lets you study the world. No, really, THE WORLD. Think about that. What other subject deals with rocks? Moving continents? AND climate? Diffusion of plants and animals? Water quality? Now, what if you add some human systems--do the other sciences let you relate the earth to economic or political systems? And culture--food, religion, music, housing, or language? How about urban systems and settlement forms? Past, present, and future, anywhere in the world? And how many subject areas let you look at something from a scientific, social-scientific, humanistic, AND artistic perspective? Yeah, I said artistic--I like to illustrate my findings with a nice map.

Tell me all about global studies or environmental science if you'd like--they're alright too. But NOTHING lets you see the world like geography does."


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beginning year :)

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 2014 11:17 AM

This 'sermon' from the Church of Geography is outstanding (the 'Church' is a geo-evangelizing group on Facebook and Twitter that is the home to the delightful memes pictured above).  Many organizations are trying to re-brand geography to gain greater public support at the same time that other interdisciplinary initiatives with geographic content are gaining traction: global studies, environmental sustainability, centers for spatial analysis, etc.  We don't need a name change as much as we need people to capture the vision of geography's centrality and holistic capacity. 


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education.

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 3, 2014 5:20 PM

This scoop caught my eye because of all the cartoons and memes. Some of them are pretty funny geography puns, and I'm sure other people will enjoy this.

There is world and human geography, and I have already learned world geography. World Geography has already helped me learn a lot about the world around me. Before, I was very illiterate in maps, but now I'm pretty decent. I can't wait to learn more in human geography! 

1) geography as a field of inquiry

It's a FB page of geography and it basically spreads the topic of geography, which is increasing in awareness. I think everybody should learn world geo and human geo is a good elective to take. 

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 2

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José Antônio Carlos - O Professor Pepe's curator insight, November 26, 2014 7:14 AM

Até a pirâmide demográfica está em crise!

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:08 PM

Spectacular changes in global demographics, a bit scaring to be honest

Bex Swaney's curator insight, December 5, 2014 12:27 PM

Growth of the ageing population, population change as a whole