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Urban Morphology in Mexico City

Urban Morphology in Mexico City | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Mexico City is a giant laboratory of urban morphology. Its 20 million residents live in neighborhoods based on a wide spectrum of plans.  The colonial center (above) was built on the foundations of Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec empire. The old city was on an island in Lake Texcoco. The lake was drained to prevent flooding as the city expanded.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl, Dennis V Thomas
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 7

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 3, 2014 1:31 PM

The dense population of Mexico City requires creative and highly organized use of space to make room for all the people. These pictures show just how organized this chaotic cities layout is, with many places resembling tight grids or computer motherboards. Poor areas tend to take on rigid block designs in a cookie-cutter pattern, and the richer areas are more flowing with curved streets and interesting layouts. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 14, 2014 10:20 PM

The images that show the various parts of Mexican neighborhoods are examples that the urban morphology is a diverse as the different levels of income and society.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 2:22 PM

Mexico City has grown so fast that city planners have a dilemma on their hands; what to do to maximize real estate utilizing the available real estate and somehow building enough homes to support this mega-city of 20 million people.

They have faced numerous hurdles including draining a lake that used to flood the city every year to using geometry in their favor. Some of these areas are gridded much like New York City, while some are used to fit as many people as possible into one area. Seems geometry plays a bigger role than one might think initially. Where rivers, streams and other natural resources exist they are used for the wealthy, while the poor suffer the indignation of homogenous lines, look alike homes, and squared plots.

The satellite photos are beautiful in their simplicity but show a much more detailed explanation for the way Mexico City has been laid out. One positive dynamic is that urban sprawl is being kept to a minimum or as much a minimum that 20 million people can occupy. This should help with services like electricity, water, gas/oil and other utilities and keep the relative costs down. This should provide affordable basics for the poor and wealthy alike.

The red stripes that run through the photos are of street markets that serve as a bit of an informal economy for the areas. This helps the area merchants, while unfortunately keeping the poor, just that way as taxes are not collected on their goods that ultimately could help fund programs that would help these people climb out of poverty.

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How does the United Nations work?

"Ever curious about the reaches of the United Nation and what they do? Here's a great video featuring Dr. Binoy Kampmark from RMIT University.  This short video can help improve your understanding of the UN, including its role in world politics and policy making."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 4

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zane alan berger's curator insight, March 25, 5:32 PM

this video explains- as it says in it's headline- how the UN works. It essentially covers the different operations the UN takes part in to maintain world peace; ranging from security to human rights to disease and so on. It also talks about the security council which consists of France, the UK, US, China, and Russia, along with the general assembly.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 25, 9:11 PM

The United Nations (UN) constantly works on maintaining international peace, economic issues, and cultural and human rights around the world. The UN has a tremendous impact around the world, with 193 nations participating in frequent meeting about how to resolve global and domestic issues and making policies for the world. The UN plays an important role in &maintain[ing] international peace and security; to develop friendly relations among nations; to operate in solving international problems and in promoting respect for human rights; and finally to be a center for harmonizing the actions of nations&(WWW.UN.org). The UN has a lot of responsibilities as it tries to keep the whole world at peace.

Carlee Allen's curator insight, March 26, 7:03 PM

This is a very short and simplified video that explains all about what the UN is and what they do. The UN plays a major role in helping developing countries and taking part with them if they are in need of help or in a crisis. This video also explains what the security council is and what they do.

 

I already knew most of the things mentioned in the video, but I always think that UN things are interesting and I'm always willing to learn more about what they do and how they are helping the world.

 

 

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The shocking differences in basic body language around the world

The shocking differences in basic body language around the world | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The body speaks volumes. But what it says depends on the culture you're in.


Tags: culture, infographic, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
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unit 3

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Keegan Johns's curator insight, March 23, 9:49 AM

It is interesting that these body languages mean different things in different cultures. Shaking your head up and down can mean "yes" in the west but in other countries it can be a negative response. Some things can be nice or friendly gestures here, but can be rude or disrespectful in other countries.

 

-KJ

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, March 23, 7:41 PM

How to understand and interpret the implications of associations among phenomena in places

This article shows different gestures and describes the meaning of each. However, the meaning of each gesture depends on where you are in the world. Different places determine if a gesture is appropriate or inappropriate. 

This relates to our unit because it is about the behaviors of people depending on where they live in the world. This article teaches people about the behaviors of others and helps us understand the differences in cultures based on the region of the the world they live in. 

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 25, 9:14 PM

People say that actions speak louder than words. However, as far as body language is concerned, actions can possess different meanings in other parts of the world. As a result, some things are better expressed through annunciation than action. It is interesting to consider the many ways body language is interpreted in different countries.  For example, for business purposes, people need to be well versed in the culture of the country and their current business practices. Otherwise, there could be harmful consequences in regards to the economy. In some countries, body language means different things in different regions. This is why it is important for people to be conscious about the culture and appropriate etiquette in different countries.

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A Japanese restaurant is selling KitKat sandwiches

A Japanese restaurant is selling KitKat sandwiches | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
KitKat sandwiches are officially a thing, and apparently they're delicious
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 3, far from the strangest menu item I've seen come out of the region, but it always makes me ask why do we have the unhealthiest reputation again?  Japan has 15 different flavors of the kit kat bar alone :)

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Who would have guessed that Lincoln Park was seeing population loss?

Who would have guessed that Lincoln Park was seeing population loss? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Chicago's affluent North Side has lost a lot of people. That's a problem for businesses, residents of moderate means and anyone who would like to move there but can't afford to.
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 7 Sometimes "trendy" can be a problem! 

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You Won't Believe How Much Sprawl Costs America

You Won't Believe How Much Sprawl Costs America | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
More than $1 trillion, according to a new report.

Via Allison Anthony
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unit 7

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Redrawing the map of Europe

"Fantasy cartography: An animated redrawing of the map of Europe.
Imagine a world in which countries could move as easily as people. A suggestion for a rearranged Europe."


Via Seth Dixon
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unit 1

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Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 4:13 PM

Summary: This is an interesting video that rearranges all the countries of Europe and moving them to the most convenient locations. This gives us a good idea of what Europe may look like if countries could move like people. 

 

Insight:This video really illustrates the 1st unit because it gives a good example of how greatly place can influence many other geographic concepts such as international relations.

Gabby cotton's curator insight, March 24, 1:49 AM

Unit 4: Political organization and space

This short video analyzes European countries and their relations and tries to reorganize accordingly, the grouping categories seem to be relations, languages, and Ethnic groups.

 

This relates to human geography because it talks about how different countries and ethnic groups get along and try to find the best possible solution to ensure the comfort of all involved nations. It talks about re-arranging borders and population density. 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, March 24, 2:01 AM

Unit 1

Summary

This video shows countries being able to move easily in order for each countries benefit. Many countries are moved away from their enemies or other feared countries. Also in this idealistic video countries that are landlocked are able to move to places with easier access to water. It also includes moving countries and territories to be near countries that would work well together.

Insight

This personifies countries as moving as they please, literally. I found this a little funny and pretty interesting to see what countries would do if they could daily move. It really reveals the importance of location and geography for countries in that countries are stuck where they are for the most part ad can't just move away from their enemies of conditions. 

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Morocco: Western Sahara Conflict Reaches British Court

Morocco: Western Sahara Conflict Reaches British Court | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Europeans are familiar with efforts, some of them successful, to label agricultural and consumer products produced by Jewish settlers in the West Bank as coming from the Palestinian West Bank, not from Israel, in order to allow consumers to make an educated decision about whether or not they wish to support Israel's continuing occupation of that territory. A similar effort is now underway in the United Kingdom to label produce coming from Western Sahara. The campaign, launched by campaigners for the freedo
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 4 and a little bit of 5-6

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Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 8:23 PM

This article discusses the labeling of products that are produced by Jew peoples in the West Bank, versus people coming out of the Palestinian West Bank. This applies to the labeling practices we discussed when learning about agriculture and the steps that should be taken in order to ensure the people about what exactly they are consuming, and in this case, the origin of the product as well.

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The Runner-Up Religions Of America

The Runner-Up Religions Of America | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

 

"Glance at the map above, Second Largest Religious Tradition in Each State 2010, and you will see that Buddhism (orange), Judaism (pink) and Islam (blue) are the runner-up religions across the country.

No surprises there. But can you believe that Hindu (dark orange) is the No. 2 tradition in Arizona and Delaware, and that Baha'i (green) ranks second in South Carolina? These numbers, although they look impressive when laid out in the map, represent a very tiny fraction of the population in any of the states listed."


Via Seth Dixon
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unit 3

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Matthew Connealy's curator insight, March 23, 9:42 PM

This map and article tells us about the runner up religions in each state of the U.S. More specifically, the Baha'i faith in South Carolina is a very rich and historical religion in the area, despite being so small. There are many Baha'i organizations in the cities and since the 60's their goal is to bring different races together and form community with one another. In Delaware, Hinduism is the runner up religion. With most Indians dominating the software engineering field, they flock towards these jobs in Delaware, thus increasing the Hindu population.

 

Christianity is the most followed religion in the U.S., and this map is very interesting to analyze. It was coo to read about the Baha'i influence in South Carolina and look at how they make an impact. This article slides right in with religion in the syllabus.

Zeke Robinson's curator insight, March 23, 11:49 PM

I think that this is very intresting about how the country is divided up into the different religion barriers.

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, March 24, 9:40 PM

Religion and sacred places-

 

This article displays the second most known and used religions  in the US. This explains why their is no christianity in the picture. In the end, the Islamic religion is mostly used in the eastern countries, and Buddhism is the mostly used religion in the western countries.

 

This article represents religion and sacred places because it  portrays the image of how so many different religious divides there are in the US.

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Colombia: from failed state to Latin American powerhouse

Colombia: from failed state to Latin American powerhouse | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
In the shadow of a violent and drug-fuelled past, business confidence is growing in Colombia, a country that has been transformed over the past decade


Tags: South America, Colombia, development, economic.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 6

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Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 15, 8:03 PM

Breeding fame and lie down to sleep......Colombia, one of the most violent countries of South America two decades ago, was having problems with narc-traffic and kidnapping by terrorist. Now its economy is coming back stronger than ever doing business and adopting globalization. Their culture on doing business is attached to a good sense of humor. Government has influenced on seal deals internally and most likely externally.  Colombia is still dealing with economic gaps and improvements in terms of knowledge and skills. Informal business on the streets have been practicing for decades since, at one point, it was the only way to survive. The economic security has started to build confidence within citizens and attract international business. Better infrastructure ideas for larger cities  such as Bogota has provided stability within the economy for both the public and private sectors. Colombia is bringing more outsiders companies in order to establish their businesses in different cities as well. 

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These twins can teach us a lot about racial identity

These twins can teach us a lot about racial identity | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Maria says she's black and Lucy says she's white. Together, they prove none of this makes sense.

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 3, super interesting!

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Savannah Rains's curator insight, March 24, 2:43 AM

Ethnicity is a man made classification of humans. We are all from the same earth correct? we are all made and born the same way correct? But for some strange reason we felt the need to divide ourselves and make pretend hate and hierarchy between people. This article proves just how weak the titles we put on ourselves are. Twins Lucy and Maria Aylmer were born but to everyone's surprise, one was "black" and one was "white". Does this make them biracial? can they flip flop what they wasn't to be? My personal ties to this article are surprising. I often feel like I am not the ethnicity I am labeled as. Both of my parents are "white" but I am always asked if I am "black" on top of that I have learned that I accept black culture and tastes more then white style. Does this make me a poser? or am I simply the victim of this false labeling we humans do. This article made it clear and fun to explore the ideas of ethnicity in a new light.

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, March 24, 12:57 PM

Cultural differences in attitudes toward gender-

This article explains how to twins do not care about each other's color, but how they are friends and help one another. They are both supportive to one another, and wish the best for eachother.

 

This portrays the idea of cultural differences in attitudes toward gender because both of them do not care what color they are and what gender, therefore, they have identical attitudes toward gender.

zane alan berger's curator insight, March 24, 3:45 PM

This article relating to Unit 3 (culture) headlines a story about twins of different races. In the blog it argues two cases; one being that this proves how far-fetched racial categorization is and the other being that they categorize themselves as black or white

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Our Blessed Homeland

Our Blessed Homeland | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it



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unit 3

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 6, 2:36 PM

One of the main reasons I wrote this article for National Geographic about how to teach cultural empathy is nicely conveyed in the cartoon above--in spite of our cultural differences, I want people to see themselves in others.  This is reminiscent to this New Yorker cartoon on the why there should not be religious conflicts in the world.  


Tags: conflictracismreligion, perspective.

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 19, 3:45 PM

How we view each other is often incredibly rash. This cartoon displays this very well. Other cultures often seems as alien as other species. However if one looks closely they can find many similarities in their cultures. This misunderstanding of culture has been at the root of many disputes and the understanding of culture has been the road to understanding  and peace. Unit 3 Culture

Michael Amberg's curator insight, March 22, 2:24 PM

This picture definitely sums up almost all the wars in history, how one side is right, and one side is wrong, but according to the two sides the enemy is the one who is evil.

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These Amazing Maps Show the True Diversity of Africa

These Amazing Maps Show the True Diversity of Africa | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"African countries are also quite diverse from an ethnic standpoint. As the Washington Post's Max Fisher noted back in 2013, the world's 20 most ethnically diverse countries are all African, partially because European colonial powers divvied up sections of the continent with little regard for how the residents would have organized the land themselves. This map above shows Africa's ethnographic regions as identified by George Murdock in his 1959 ethnography of the continent."


Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, political, language, ethnicity.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

units 3-4

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Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 25, 7:40 PM

Africa is the most diverse continent in the world. With 1,000 to 2,000 language being spoken there. Africa also holds the world’s 20 most ethnically diverse countries. This article says that this diversity is partially due how European powers divided up sections of the continent with no regard to how the residents would adapt. There are also other countries that have tried to/or colonized African countries which has further diversified Africa. The Largest City is Lagos in Nigeria with over 8 Million people

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 26, 10:42 AM

It is mind-boggling how this beautiful continent is studied so little in America.  For some reason, Africa is not glorified as a ethnic melting-pot or a growing economy.  This article and subsequent maps detail how special Africa really is.  Most people think of Africa as having one race and ethnicity living in a dry desert.  This could not be further from the truth.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 4:53 PM

Truly amazing of how diverse Africa is.  They call America the melting pot of the world, but Africa's diversity as a continent is baffeling. It makes sense due to all of the different tribes and countries who have ruled land here over the last few thousand years, but still amazes me when you look at the numbers, especially the fact that there are 2000 languages spoken here.  The ethnographic map was the craziest map in my opinion.  No surprise that there conflict arising constantly in Africa's countries.

 

 

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Why Starbucks Is The Way To Boost Your Home's Value

Why Starbucks Is The Way To Boost Your Home's Value | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
We're always hunting for ways to increase the value of our homes -- and interior revamps or full-on remodels may do the trick.

Or you could just move near a Starbucks.

Homes located near a Starbucks coffee shop appreciate (aka increase in valu...
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 7.  Not noted in this article but the study also indicated that Homes on roads called courts or ways gained value faster than homes on boulevards or streets.

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A bird's-eye view of war-torn Syria

A bird's-eye view of war-torn Syria | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A school that lays in ruins, hospitals and refugee camps under attack, and a city center with the size of Manhattan destroyed by shelling — these are some of the shocking details of a new United Nations report on the conflict in Syria, four years after in began.


Tags: Syria, MiddleEast, conflict, political, remote sensing.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 4

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Connor Hendricks's curator insight, March 23, 4:31 PM

This is a artical about how Syria is in the middle of a war. I think this a good example of how some nationalities are thrown together and each one if fighting for control of the state.

Kyle Freeman's curator insight, March 23, 10:43 PM

This is an interesting article as it provides many before and after photos of conflict on the Syrian landscape. The distribution of the contestants for Syria is also interesting. The Kurds up at the top are not that far into Syria but have taken up a small portion. The Syrian government forces have large concentrations around the major cities that have not already been taken. The orange rebels (many different rebel groups) have taken a large portion of land between the two cities called Aleppo and Hama. While ISIS has taken Deir al-Zour, a city on the Euphrates river, which will provide a better farming area and source of natural water to use. This armed conflict is interesting because there are four factions at play all looking for a different goal. ISIS is on a religious quest to create an Islamic State. The kurds simply want a state of their own. The rebels are interested in overthrowing the current Syrian government where the Syrian government clearly doesn't want that to happen. All of these conflicting views has turned Syria into a battleground.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 25, 9:13 PM

It is heartbreaking to see these images from the satellite of how Syrian lands were devastated after massive shelling to different cities. Infrastructure had been destroyed and also left many causalities in multiple areas. Cities have been reshaped due to excessive migration of citizens to neighboring countries such as Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey, and Iraq. Around 3 million Syrian citizens have migrated since the conflict started between the rebellious Syrian government and terrorist Islamic state. Targeted cities such as as Aleppo suffered the most damage in the attacks. Refugee camps have stared to resemble big cities. Syrian citizens are living in makeshift camps, however refugee camps are supposed to be provisional but they have become permanent places to live in order to ensure survival.

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Roam the World in (Almost) Real Time

Roam the World in (Almost) Real Time | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A groundbreaking Mapbox project ushers in a new era for online cartography.

 

On Google Earth, the seasons rarely change. Most anywhere a digital traveler goes, the sky is cloudless and the grass is green. No snow on the ground in Iowa. No fire in Valparaiso. It's a big gap between the world as it is and as it's mapped.

Launched Thursday,a landmark project from Mapbox has changed the summertime paradigm for online cartography. Landsat-live reveals the planet's surface in real time and in stunning resolution, fed by a constant stream of public-domain imagery from NASA’s Landsat 8 satellite.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 1

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Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 12:47 PM

In this article we are shown the development and evolution of cartography. We can observe the changing geography on the planet and the real time gives us an accurate reading. I feel like this innovation could greatly help us.

YEC Geo's curator insight, March 23, 11:59 AM

This sounds really cool.

 

UPDATE:  I've had a chance to look at this. 

 

Cool things:  great images.

 

Not so cool:  It's not a substitute for Google Earth.   You can only pan out or in to a limited degree, so to go from Texas to Timbuctoo, for example, would take a lot of clicking and dragging.  Best way to get to a place is to type it in the search box.  No 3-D view also. And if there are a lot of clouds when the image was taken, they'll obscure the landscape.

 

That being said, if you want to see large-scale, recent images of a particular place, it's a good site. 

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 4:34 PM

Summary: This interesting article talks a lot about modern technologies effect on the popularity of geography. This article talks about how programs like Google Earth have caused a general interest to arise about physical geography.

 

Insight: This article is significant to unit 1 because it shows how GIS can be so influential to not only geographers but to the rest of society.

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Cartographically Inspired Fashion

Cartographically Inspired Fashion | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

I found this on pinterest (where else?) and decided to share the geographically inspired craftiness:

1. Paint your nails white/cream
2. Soak nails in alcohol for five minutes
3. Press nails to map and hold
4. Paint with clear protectant immediately after it dries.

This also works with newspaper, but don't try it with NatGeo Maps because the paper is of too high a quality to have the ink bleed out; I would recommend using an old USGS Topo map. 

 

Tags: fun, art.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

I heart maps!  I cant wait for spring break to try this :)

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Mrs. B's curator insight, March 25, 8:13 AM

Yes to map fashion! I saw a woman with a map skirt - so cool. MAPSMAPSMAPS!!!

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Orthodox Jews in central Ohio toss old hot plates after tragic N.Y. fire

Orthodox Jews in central Ohio toss old hot plates after tragic N.Y. fire | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Some members of the Jewish community in central Ohio are tossing old appliances after seven Orthodox Jewish children died in a Brooklyn, N.Y., fire caused by a malfunctioning electric hot plate used to keep food warm during the Sabbath.
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 3, many have been questioning how long is too long before truly reconsidering a longstanding cultural tradition. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 11:50 AM

These deaths were so unnecessary, both from religious and a technological safety standpoints.  I do honor their desire to maintain religious purity and hope that everyone can finding a safe manner to do so; I think this will serve as a huge wake-up call to reconsider some traditions, or the interpretations thereof. 


All religions and folk cultures today are all searching for ways to maintain their most values tradition in a midst of a modernized, secular world that might often scorns them as backwards.  Most religions developed customs in a different technological and cultural context and finding how to do so is a balancing act...this was one of the over-arching themes of the classic film Fiddler on the Roof; Tevye, an observant Russian Jew searches for the core values behind his most prized traditions and seeks to keep observing them and his daughters continually push the limits of tradition.

Courtney Barrowman's comment, March 25, 12:36 PM
I like the way you pointed out the balancing act of finding a way to keep the most valuable traditions in a modern technological and cultural context. Thanks for your input-
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Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia

Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The purpose-built city of Naypyidaw – unveiled a decade ago this year – boasts 20-lane highways, golf courses, fast Wi-Fi and reliable electricity. The only thing it doesn’t seem to have is people, report Matt Kennard and Claire Provost


Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, urban, urbanism.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 7

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Jacob McCullough's curator insight, March 23, 6:55 PM

This building is awesome, it truly shows the marvles of architecture and the difference culture and religion make on it 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, March 24, 2:28 AM

Unit 3 

Summary

In Burma's city Naypyidaw, there are huge infrastructures that seem random and surrounded by rural life on the outside of the high city. The city is six times the size of New York and it is built with huge highways, some even with twenty lanes. Also the city has good electricity and WiFi connections. The city sounds great excepts there are barely enough people to fill the city. The he highways are a waste of space almost with no omen using them. 

Insight

This strange city i every peculiar to me too. The Placement of this rich city in the middle of what used to be rural land is odd and I don;t see if benefiting them now but maybe in the future. The city may be nice with buildings ad infrastructures, but it seems fake to people. Like the hotels may seem nice but overall feel cheap as some people say. This city is very strange but I hope one day it will be put to good use.

 

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 28, 3:16 PM

What went wrong in making Burma not attractive to tourists or corporate businesses? There are so many reasons for this empty capital. The government spent $4 billion on infrastructure repair, roads and even an airport for better capital in Burma. However, the regime in the region make the city non functional. A modern city with many amenities was, in reality, built for governmental purpose. Furthermore, the system threatened its residents and abused them, stripping them of their human rights. For a city to be functional with so much potential in areas such as infrastructure, there needs to be better leaders to reboost the economy in order to attract more people. There are a lot of strategies that the government has to implement to be able to succeed and start to compete with big cities around the world. Unfortunately, so far their efforts seem to produce nothing but failure.

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Quiz on the Differences Between Sunni and Shia Islam

Quiz on the Differences Between Sunni and Shia Islam | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Most of the world's major religions are made up of multiple sects or denominations, and Islam is no different. Islam's two major sects are the Sunnis and the Shiites, and the division and interplay between the two is a major factor in the geopolitics of the Middle East. How well do you understand Sunni and Shiite Islam? Take our quiz and find out!

Via Seth Dixon
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unit 3

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Connor Hendricks's curator insight, March 24, 8:09 AM

This is a quiz about the differences between Sunni and Shiite islam. I think this a cool way to see how much you know about them and learn new things about those religions.

BEAULIEU ADRIEN's curator insight, March 26, 5:53 AM

Comprenez la différence entre sunnites et shiites facilement grace à cet article;

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 4:17 PM

 A nice little quiz that tests your knowledge on Sunni and Shia Islam.  I myself scored a 69 so there is much to learn for me on the differences between the 2.  The Shia are thought of as the more extreme of the two sects, so I was shocked to see that Hussein and Bin Ladin were both Sunni.  The complications between these two are important to know about as they are making headlines in world news.  Its tough to understand these people when you know nothing about their history.

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First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga

First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

The first photographs have emerged of a newly formed volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean after three men climbed to the peak of the land mass off the coast of Tonga. Experts believe a volcano exploded underwater and then expanded until an island formed. The island is expected to erode back into the ocean in a matter of months.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 4

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Coco Angus's curator insight, March 17, 4:45 PM

Mountain building 

WebGems SNMinc's curator insight, March 18, 12:20 AM

Spectacular view!

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, March 24, 1:38 AM

I think this is a article about how a whole new island came up from a volcanic eruption. It gets even more interesting when you realize that it will disappear in a matter of months. This article shows photographs of this new island and information about it. I thought it was pretty interesting how seabirds are already laying eggs on the island!

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Inside the secretive state of Eritrea

Inside the secretive state of Eritrea | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
For the first time in nearly a decade, the BBC has been allowed to film inside Eritrea, one of the world's most secretive states but which has made progress in healthcare, as Yalda Hakim reports.
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 4, 5

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Ryan Tibari's curator insight, March 24, 9:58 AM

This article discusses the medical progress made in the secretive state of Eritrea. The state is very minimally populated, but they have made several important strides in efforts to improve healthcare for their people. Demonstrates the GDP model: less people = better education for the overall population, resulting in better jobs and a more reliable economy. 

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 24, 10:39 AM

Unit 4:

By being impacted by the globalization from neighboring developed and educated countries, the state of Eritrea has made many steps towards their goals in the region of healthcare. The small number of people that inhabit the region create a more viable and demanding economy due to the high education rates that are present. 

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Italy is a 'dying country' says minister as birth rate plummets

Italy is a 'dying country' says minister as birth rate plummets | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
New figures show the lowest total number of births since the formation of the modern Italian state


Fewer babies were born in Italy in 2014 than in any other year since the modern Italian state was formed in 1861, new data show, highlighting the demographic challenge faced by the country’s chronically sluggish economy.  National statistics office ISTAT said on Thursday the number of live births last year was 509,000, or 5,000 fewer than in 2013, rounding off half a century of decline.  The number of babies born to both natives and foreigners living in Italy dropped as immigration, which used to support the overall birth rate, tumbled to its lowest level for five years.


Tag: Italy, Europe, declining populations, population, demographic transition model.


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unit 2

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Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 7:52 PM

Summary: This article basically confirms the DTM. It talks about how because of Italy's wealth there population may cease to exist in the far future.

 

Insight: This article not only has a lot to do with the DTM, but it also analyzes several factors affecting population.

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 8:40 PM

Unit 2: 

Italy continues to round off half a century of declines in births. Recent statistics show that the countries birth rates are at the lowest rate they have been since the formation of the modern Italian state. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 11:53 AM

UNIT 2 POPULATION

This article is very informative on the current situation in Italy. Fewer babies were born in 2014 than in any other year since 1861, and this is said to be connected to the country's "sluggish economy". Immigration, a factor that previously contributed to the birth rate in Italy, has been at its lowest in five years. People in Italy are dying, and there are not enough births to balance out the country. As a result, the country is so called "dying". The government of Prime Minister Matteo Renzi is trying very hard boost the economy by reforming the labour market and trying to convince young adults to stay in Italy rather than working abroad. This whole conflict in Italy involves the promotion of population growth in a country, because the country is dying and needs a more stable population.

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City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs

City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

A new report tracks demographic trends across 66 U.S. metro areas.  The report provides comprehensive evidence for Aaron Renn's "new donut" model of cities (pictured in above image, on the right). Renn's model proposes that city centers and outer-ring suburbs are doing well economically, but inner-ring suburbs are struggling with a new influx of poverty."


Tags: urban, economic, urban models, APHG.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 7

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Raven Blair's curator insight, March 10, 10:06 AM

A new model, called the "New Donut" is being supported for the way cities are changing. City centers are beginning to be equal in income and education levels to the inner suburbs of the city. AS of 2012, Charlotte, North Carolina is one of the best examples that would support the new model.

jada_chace's curator insight, March 10, 10:06 AM

The suburbs thrive since families enjoy living in the areas because they provide safe and friendly neighborhoods for their children to live. The suburbs are a perfect location to live and they are closer to the city than the rural areas. The inner-ring suburbs are struggling since not many families enjoy living there. They may attract younger individuals that are in search of a job or young adults that are educated. Since they are more individuals wanting families and a safe environment to live in the inner-suburbs are losing people to keep them alive. 

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, March 24, 10:00 AM

Although this is a unit 7 concept, this idea can also be applied to our unit 5 agriculture studies. Set up like the von Thunen model, city centers are starting to lose economic gains and opportunities, while the city suburbs suck them all up. This change in economic shifts can extremely effect the way that the central business district of a political region is set up. 

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Why the side-hustle is key to Nigeria's economy

Nkem Ifejika meets with Nigerian entrepreneurs who show how the nation's economy is finding lubricants other than oil.

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 6

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 20, 12:17 PM

The shadow economy, the black market or the side-hustle; these are all names for the informal sector of the economy.  In many countries such as Nigeria, this is a way of making money outside their normal jobs to boost their income and try to rise above just getting by.  "It was my grandmother who taught my mum that if you were lucky enough to have a salaried job, that was just pocket money. The real money came from your five to nine."  If working 9-to-5 represents the formal economy, this BBC podcast (and accompanying article) are all about the 5-to-9 economy. 


Tags: economic, laborNigeria, podcast

Rowena Spence Cortina's curator insight, March 10, 10:37 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

The shadow economy, the black market or the side-hustle; these are all names for the informal sector of the economy.  In many countries such as Nigeria, this is a way of making money outside their normal jobs to boost their income and try to rise above just getting by.  "It was my grandmother who taught my mum that if you were lucky enough to have a salaried job, that was just pocket money. The real money came from your five to nine."  If working 9-to-5 represents the formal economy, this BBC podcast (and accompanying article) are all about the 5-to-9 economy

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'Dirty Old London': Geographies of Human Waste

'Dirty Old London': Geographies of Human Waste | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

In the 19th century, London was the capital of the largest empire the world had ever known — and it was infamously filthy. It had choking, sooty fogs; the Thames River was thick with human sewage; and the streets were covered with mud.  But according to Lee Jackson, author of Dirty Old London: The Victorian Fight Against Filth, mud was actually a euphemism. 'It was essentially composed of horse dung,' he tells Fresh Air's Sam Briger. 'There were tens of thousands of working horses in London [with] inevitable consequences for the streets. And the Victorians never really found an effective way of removing that, unfortunately.'"


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Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 6-7 ewwwwwwww

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FCHSAPGEO's curator insight, March 14, 11:19 AM

We just spoke about this in class!

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 15, 8:09 PM

It was after the 19th century that Joseph Bazelgette invented the sewer system in London that ultimately decreased the death rate in the city. At this time, horses served as the primary mode of transportation but also caused significant health problems due to the the excrement and urine left in the streets. Although we no longer rely on horses as a main soruce of transportation, we are experiencing another type of pollution caused by the ommission of harmful gases from automobiles. Infrastructure was not ideal and appropriate for most residents in the London. Dumping wastes into the river and drinking the water without any chemical treatment was one of the major health issues with which communities struggled. However, in present day China, people and industries continue to dump wastes into the rivers where local fish are caught for consumption. The lack of urban planning in London left 15,000 people dead. With so mmany people living in such close vicinity to each other, the diseases sread rapidly and wiped  out many impoverished communcities. Innovation in public health improved sanitiation conditions with the introduction of the toilet.However, in early 20th century culture, women were not comfortable using public toilets.

Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 12:03 PM

London has come a far way from the industrial town it was in the 19th century, and is now cleaner than ever. But pollution led to many issues in London at the time. This is also evident in the developing world today, such as in China, Africa, and South America.