AP Human Geography
Follow
Find tag "regions"
3.8K views | +0 today
AP Human Geography
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Redrawing the map of Europe

"Fantasy cartography: An animated redrawing of the map of Europe.
Imagine a world in which countries could move as easily as people. A suggestion for a rearranged Europe."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 1

more...
Gabby cotton's curator insight, March 24, 1:49 AM

Unit 4: Political organization and space

This short video analyzes European countries and their relations and tries to reorganize accordingly, the grouping categories seem to be relations, languages, and Ethnic groups.

 

This relates to human geography because it talks about how different countries and ethnic groups get along and try to find the best possible solution to ensure the comfort of all involved nations. It talks about re-arranging borders and population density. 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, March 24, 2:01 AM

Unit 1

Summary

This video shows countries being able to move easily in order for each countries benefit. Many countries are moved away from their enemies or other feared countries. Also in this idealistic video countries that are landlocked are able to move to places with easier access to water. It also includes moving countries and territories to be near countries that would work well together.

Insight

This personifies countries as moving as they please, literally. I found this a little funny and pretty interesting to see what countries would do if they could daily move. It really reveals the importance of location and geography for countries in that countries are stuck where they are for the most part ad can't just move away from their enemies of conditions. 

Aleena Reyes's curator insight, May 6, 11:53 PM

A very interesting and fun short video. It raises a lot of questions has to how this could be done (if it could) and how one creates borders and regions.

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map?

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers.  Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers."


Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, regions, gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, density.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 4

more...
Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Which States Are in the Midwest?

Which States Are in the Midwest? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Here's a somewhat regular argument I get in: Which states make up which regions of the United States? Some of these regions -- the West Coast, Mountain States, Southwest and Northeast are pretty cl...

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 1 

more...
Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 9:08 PM

I've gotten into this argument a couple times, the one that sticks out in my mind is one I had with a Rhode Island transplant from Illinois. Being a living historian of the American War for Independence, some of those 18th century ideas leak into my 21st century life. Those transplants, also living historians, were shocked to hear that I claimed anything West of the Appalachians was the "frontier" and therefore, anything above Kentucky and West of Nebraska was the "Midwest". We had a slight friendly exchange of words about what the Midwest is and where it really is. These regional borders Americans have created not only rely on topography, but also with vernacular and culture on a regional level. A state one day could be considered part of the Midwest but a few decades later could be part of Northeast, the South, or any of the other regions.

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 18, 12:03 PM

The map above shows the results of a survey that asked people if they thought their state was considered part of the Midwest or not. The highest percentage of responses of yes came from Illinoise at 81%. The lowest percentage of responses of yes came from Wyoming at 10%.This survey is a perfect example of how cultural factors influence how people see themselves spatially. Its a very interesting concept. Perceptual regions are hard to define by formal regions. It would have been interesting if this survey had shown where the responses were spatially in their state. 

Cade Bruce's curator insight, March 22, 6:39 PM

This survey illustrates how culture influences peoples perceptual regions. Even though Illinois is east of the actual midpoint of the United States, it is widely considered the midwest, where Wyoming, which is west of the middle of the United States is not considered by many to be part of the Midwest. People from different cultures have differing perceptual regions. This belongs in the category of major geographical concepts underlying the geographical perspective: because types of regions is a major geographical concept.

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A Map of Baseball Nation

A Map of Baseball Nation | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Fans may not list which team they favor on the census, but millions of them do make their preferences public on Facebook. Using aggregated data provided by the company, we were able to create an unprecedented look at the geography of baseball fandom, going down not only to the county level, as Facebook did in a nationwide map it released a few weeks ago, but also to ZIP codes."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 1 & 3

more...
Greg Russak's curator insight, April 29, 2014 12:53 PM

Maps and baseball - a good combination!

Wyatt Wolf's curator insight, October 30, 2014 7:46 PM

My favorite baseball team is the Philadelphia Phillies, here's everyone else's.

Global Speechwriter's comment, November 4, 2014 2:52 AM
Jays? C'mon.
Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference

Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"I am torn about how to teach these two ideas about cultures and societies all around the world:

People and cultures are different all over the world.People and cultures are the same all over the world.

These points may seem like a contradiction, but when put into proper context they teach important truths about culture."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 3

more...
Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 9:48 PM

Unit 3:

Shines insight on stereotypes that are commonly used throughout the world. Reading this article really made me think about stereotypes that are so commonly used they are considered acceptable. It's a ridiculous idea to think that all people under a culture act and behave the same way. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 12:06 PM

UNIT 3 CULTURE

This article is written to compare and contrast various ways to teach young school children about global cultures. On one hand, we can relate all cultures to each other, due to their common goals and views. For example, all families around the world aim to do what's best for each other, love and cherish one another, and try their hardest to succeed economically. On the other hand, cultures are extremely different around the world, with different music, clothing, and underlying views on life. We can continue to say that popular culture has diffused so greatly, with advanced technologies and means of transportation, so it has influenced and homogenized our landscape quite a bit. Folk culture is obviously still a powerful force, but popular culture does have some effects around the world. I believe that children need to understand the importance of maintaining diversity thy preserving folk culture but they also need to acknowledge the pros and cons of the global diffusion of popular culture and how it connects us at a global scale. 

Danielle Smith's curator insight, April 12, 12:21 AM

I think Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference is a helpful article for teachers to read. This article considers ideas I constantly come back to, whilst collecting resources and ideas for teaching students about cultural diversity and identity. How do I teach students, that ‘people and cultures are different all over the world’ (Dixon, 2015, April 2), but also the same?

Dixon suggests that we need to teach that people and cultures worldwide are the SAME and DIFFERENT simultaneously.  In this way, students can appreciate the rich diversity of cultures and societies, whilst at the same time learning values of humanity and empathy, which unite us all.

 

I believe by recognising and appreciating the rich cultures of students in the classroom, we can explore and learn about cultural diversity in an honest, rich and non-stereotypical way and allow students to feel valued at the same time. In addition, as students know each other, this helps them relate to ‘people from other places, who speak other languages’ and follow different religions to their own (Dixon, 2015, April 2). Furthermore, this should help increase intercultural understanding in the classroom by developing a ‘socially cohesive’ environment that ‘respects, and appreciates cultural, social and religious diversity’ (MYCEETA, p. 7).

 

References

Dixon, S. (2015, April 2). Teaching cultural empathy: Stereotypes, world views and cultural difference. National Geographic. Retrieved April 7, 2015, http: http://blog.education.nationalgeographic.com/2015/02/04/teaching-cultural-empathy-stereotypes-world-views-and-cultural-difference/

 

Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training, and Youth Affairs. (2008, December). Melbourne declaration on educational goals for young Australians. Melbourne: Author. 

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
How alarmist, racist coverage of Ebola makes things worse. A dressing down of the latest #NewsweekFail.

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 3 and 4

more...
Danielle Lip's curator insight, March 15, 2:21 PM

Today these are still people who are racist in a way towards people of color, a sentence in this article states "people of color — were inherently less intelligent than northern Europeans with light-colored skin." Thinking that someone is less intelligent because of the skin color is very rude and unintelligent in a way. 

This article is describing how Africa is believed to be dirty, so that is how the Ebola virus was brought to the United States. A group of scientists proved that this is invalid. Ebola is caused by bushmeat and there is no chance of bush meat smuggling could bring Ebola to America. The whole Ebola case goes to show that Africa is still seen as dirty and unsanitary. This article is not focused primarily on Ebola but how the case showed how Africa is viewed in others eyes.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 9:12 AM

It's time to change our views on the "Dark Continent" known as Africa. Time to slow down the knee jerk reaction to newsworthy stories emanating from this geographical area. This is overt racism at its core. Africa as we learned in class last week has five of the top ten growing economies in the world. How can we help this continent thrive economically if we have so many preconceived notions of what this place is all about? 

"Bushmeat" is just another acronym that is contextually manipulated to give inaccurate information and to sell print. As the author states, just call it game as most of the free world acknowledges it. Africa is a rich country with multiple heritages albeit with a long history of repression and fractured civilizations. It's time we pay them back with financial support via The World Bank, and start to change our distorted views of this area. It's abundant natural resources are just waiting to be harvested, which when allocated morally correctly will bring this impoverished continent out of the Third World and into sustainability for its peoples.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2:21 PM

Before I even read the article, my first thought went to the Linneaus classification.  That really damaged history with this one chart.  I think people still think of Africans and blacks(very dark blacks) as dirty or unintelligent.  Which is horrible and couldn't be further from the truth.  Misinforming the public is criminal.  News media and social media need to be careful and educate properly.  I've been asked from a customs offical, "Have you been to Africa in the past 6 months?"  Which is a very blanket question because Africa is a continent.  There were areas that were not hit with Ebola.  

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Topography of Religion

Topography of Religion | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The Pew survey sorts people into major groupings--Christians; other religions, including Jewish and Muslim; and 'unaffiliated,' which includes atheist, agnostic and 'nothing in particular.'  Roll your cursor over the map to see how faiths and traditions break down by state."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 3

more...
Ignacio Quintana's curator insight, December 1, 2014 6:56 PM

Even though this is just an info-graphic, this is very interesting. What we can see from this map is the spatial organization of religion specifically in the U.S. It's interesting to see how protestant makes up the majority (but apparently not according to the article above this from Haak's page) and how drastically these views can change from coast to coast, and state to state. What I find particularly interesting is that you can clearly find hearths of many of these religions, for example, Utah has an extremely out-numbering amount of Mormons. For obvious reasons that is, but still very educational to see the centers of many of the big religions in the United States.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 8:46 PM

Looking at the map, it looks like the Northeast is predominately Catholic while the further South you go along the Eastern coast, you find more Protestants, mostly Evangelical, especially in the from Confederate States. The Mid and Northwest seems to hold a healthy mix of all the Christian denominations while places in the Southwest have a higher Catholic percentage, my guess would be from immigration from Mexico. The one odd ball out in the Southwest is Utah with its 58% of Mormons.

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 4:04 PM

Different cultural religions and senses of place in America. This graph shows the diversity of religion around the united states as it varies from place to place. 

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Regional slang words

Regional slang words | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

How many of these 107 regional slang words do you use?  This week on Mental Floss' YouTube information session, author and vlogger John Green explains 107 slang words specific to certain regions.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
more...
Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 8:50 PM

Although this was a rescooped article from another geography profile, when you clicked on it the link didn't come up. Here is the main link: http://mentalfloss.com/article/52558/107-regional-slang-words. A ton of people use slang words, but can you think of one hundred and seven different ones that you use? I know before I watched this video I couldn't. Just the first seven listed in this video were all describing a can of Dr. Pepper. One term they used that I had never heard was a Tonic. This was used in Boston so it was surprising to not here of it, especially when being so close to RI. Other slangs words varied from calling a grinder a hoogie, saying something is Baltic, meaning cold, and streams being called branches, usually in Wisconsin. It was interesting to see all the different words used to describe everyday items all around the world. We may talk a lot of slang, but I can guarantee that no one has heard of all these different slang terms. Great video produced by a funny guy, really enjoyable.  

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, January 30, 11:10 AM

This was a neat video.  Many of the slang words that I knew about were touched upon, but many were very new to me.  I never knew the "bubbler" originated in Wisconsin.  I thought that was purely a R.I. thing.  Watching the video made me think of how different regions were originally settled by different ethnicity groups between the early 1600's and 1800's, which almost surely led to these slangs, in my opinion.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 4, 6:55 PM

This was a great video describing what people call different items all over the world.  Just in Rhode Island alone, people from different parts of the state refer to items in different ways.  I think it could have been better if he stuck to the United States only.  Its crazy how different people experience things so close in proximity to each other.  It also would have been great to show how different regions in the U.S. say certain words.  He probably could have made a 30 minute video on that alone and it would have been hilarious.