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Imaginary Geographies

Imaginary Geographies | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
This fabulous 1927 map shows some of the key reasons why the movie industry flourished in Los Angeles–California’s physical geography is incredibly diverse. As the industry was emerging in the first half of the 20th century, they didn’t have massive budgets to travel the world to give their locations a great degree of geographic accuracy it their set locations. Southern California was the ideal home base for a wide range of locations that could physically approximate so many environments and ecosystems. This cost saving strategy had more than economic ramifications; this strategy reinforced many spatial (and cultural) stereotypes in the movies that powerfully influenced how people conceptualized what these places were like. These geographies of cinematic imagination, created for economic purposes, shape our regional perceptions.

 

Tags: place, California, landscape, popular culture, industry.


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John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 7:17 AM

This is really cool. The movie industry thrives in California for many reasons. Good weather was a major one, but having so many different "climate types" in one area was very beneficial.  

sharon siwela's curator insight, November 6, 2015 7:59 AM

couldn't agree with this more.

FCHSAPGEO's curator insight, November 7, 2015 2:20 PM

Going to California next week and this is really interesting!

 

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How being surrounded by water made the Dutch different

How being surrounded by water made the Dutch different | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
While researching a book on ‘Why the Dutch are Different’, Ben Coates realised that an amazingly large number of the things which an outsider might think of as ‘typically Dutch’ could be explained at least in part by a single factor: water.

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https://www.fiverr.com/services_va's curator insight, October 14, 2015 6:09 PM

Get a winning #Resume and #CoverLetter here: https://www.fiverr.com/services_va/write-a-professional-resume-cv-or-cover-letter ;… #jobsearch #jobboard #TheApprentice #WCW

asli telli's curator insight, October 15, 2015 1:37 AM

What is "typically" #Dutch? #sea #saltwater #sailing #trade #ancient #heritage

Sarah Nobles's curator insight, November 27, 2015 7:55 AM

Environmental Determinalism....Unit 3

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Rust Belt Rebirth Through Gentrification?

It’s become difficult to afford urban living in places like San Francisco, New York or even Portland, but there is an alternative. In Rust Belt cities like Pittsburgh, Buffalo and Cincinnati, you can buy or rent for about 1/10th the price.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 18, 2015 11:37 AM

I've discussed Cincinnati's gentrification several times here, but this video adds the personal touch where you can see into the mind, ethos and motives of those moving in to poorer neighborhoods with hopes to renovate a community where the logic of 'disinvestment' has prevailed for decades.  Gentrification is often criticized for displacing the urban poor, but this shows how some are eager to tie themselves into the fabric of the neighborhood as the neighborhood is changing; they aren't just wealthy people buying out the poor. 


Tags: neighborhoodlandscape, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economicAPHG, Cincinnati

Nicholas Widaman's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:54 PM

This clip talks about how people are "migrating" to more industrial based cities because the rent is so cheap.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 4:24 PM

I like this idea of gentrification, meaning you rebuild and renovate something that is old, dilapidated, and really not worth fixing up. Renovating places like this brings a whole new atmosphere to the area, it brings it to life, a life it once had that it lost. Renovating these areas is also probably good, because it raises the value of the area and higher value areas may just attract people to come see. Also, fixing up old restaurants, bars or other forms of entertainment might be enticing to people that are local and far away to check out what is new. Also, in general it will bring new economy to the area, renovating means construction jobs, finished construction jobs lead to new jobs because something can open in a newly renovated building and that new business will need employees. 

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These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore

These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
How vacant houses trace the boundaries of Baltimore's black neighborhoods.

 

The map on the left shows one very tiny dot for each person living in Baltimore. White people are blue dots, blacks are green, Asians are red and Hispanics yellow.The map on the right shows the locations of Baltimore City's 15,928 vacant buildings. Slide between the two maps and you'll immediately notice that the wedge of white Baltimore, jutting down from the Northwest to the city center, is largely free of vacant buildings. But in the black neighborhoods on either side, empty buildings are endemic.


Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, economic, race, poverty, spatial, housing.


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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, April 29, 2015 7:00 PM

Inequality 

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, May 24, 2015 9:14 PM

Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use

 

This article is about Sandtown, Baltimore and its shift into a disamenity sector. It explains how this neighborhood, mainly housed by blacks, had a high percentage of vacant houses. The article says that this neighborhood is overrun with poverty, war on drugs and gangs and has the more residents in jail than any other neighborhood. This shows the changing demographics of the city of Baltimore.

 

This relates to unit 7 because it covers the topic of disamenity sectors and changing demographics. It shows reasons for the high levels of poverty and abandoned housing. It also shows the racial spatial distribution of the neighborhood and its correlation to housing and development.  

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 1:46 AM

This article left me heart broken. The African American community in Baltimore is stuck in a deep poverty cycle, and it cannot seem to escape its impoverished past. Even now, the poverty in the area seems to just be getting worse. The problems of income disparity lead to more problems than just economic; they lead to social and political problems. Social unrest and injustice occurs as a result of the modern white flight. This article arose as a result of the death of Freddie Gray, whose death demonstrates a significant social issue that needs to be addressed: police brutality and the criminal targeting of the African American community. His death stems from the tremendously amounts of disparity in the city. Promoting investment in the inner city would definitely help alleviate the poverty in the area. The problem is getting people to invest.

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11 Signs Your Hood Is Being Gentrified

11 Signs Your Hood Is Being Gentrified | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A Washington, D.C., resident describes the changes and privilege that have moved into her longtime neighborhood.


Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic, Washington DC.


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Emily Bian's curator insight, March 22, 2015 8:48 PM

7) Uneven development, zones of abandonment, disamenity, and gentrification

This article was written by a woman who noticed a lot of changes in Washington D.C. Gentrification led to these many changes, by becoming not as unique and urbanizing at other people's expense. She describes gentrification as remodeling very quickly and ferociously. A lot of the things she says are for the general good of the people, like installing street lights, but don't take into consideration the people who don't appreciate the changes. Stores like walmart are taking over the family owned stores, and more people are moving in. 

This article describes gentrification perfectly, and I like her pictures to go along with it. I think this would help introduce this vocab term to new students. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 12:29 AM

Sadly, gentrification happens all across the world. Poor populations in cities are disadvantaged and often have to move out due to wealthier populations moving in. One of the signs I found most disturbing was that police will start patrolling the areas where wealthier and poorer populations mix. This is a sad reality. Police do this to ensure that crime rates are low as poor people would be more tempted to commit crimes in wealthier neighborhoods. I do think this police patrolling has racist roots since the poorer population in Washington D.C. is mostly black. Words like "renewal" and "redevelopment" hide the sad reality behind gentrification/

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:36 PM

I believe this article is very interesting because it shows how gentrification can change a neighborhood. I believe gentrification is a little bit of a negative thing because it adds geographical uniformity to our modern society and yes that could be good thing in measure. The article states now police patrol every street, Walmart's and 7-11's start showing up, areas will start becoming more aesthetically pleasing, but is that really a good thing? I believe that sometimes while you are driving by it is better to have a change in your surrounding, rather than seeing the same thing over and over again even if it is more modern.

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Stop Complaining About Gentrification Unless You Know What It Is

Stop Complaining About Gentrification Unless You Know What It Is | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"In many cities, it's become popular to hate 'gentrifiers,' rich people who move in and drive up housing prices -- pushing everyone else out. But what's going on in these rapidly-changing urban spaces is a lot more complicated than that."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 28, 2014 2:02 PM

Gentrification can be a very touchy subject.  What appears to be economic revitalization of a down-trodden neighborhood to one, can appear to be systematic removal of minorities to another.  This op-ed isn't a whole-hearted embrace of gentrification, but it might be seen as a critique of the gentrification critics.

  

Tags: neighborhood, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economic.

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A Map of Baseball Nation

A Map of Baseball Nation | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Fans may not list which team they favor on the census, but millions of them do make their preferences public on Facebook. Using aggregated data provided by the company, we were able to create an unprecedented look at the geography of baseball fandom, going down not only to the county level, as Facebook did in a nationwide map it released a few weeks ago, but also to ZIP codes."


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Greg Russak's curator insight, April 29, 2014 12:53 PM

Maps and baseball - a good combination!

Wyatt Wolf's curator insight, October 30, 2014 7:46 PM

My favorite baseball team is the Philadelphia Phillies, here's everyone else's.

Global Speechwriter's comment, November 4, 2014 2:52 AM
Jays? C'mon.
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How Chicago became the country's alley capital

How Chicago became the country's alley capital | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
How Chicago became the alley capital of the country and why so much of the rest of the region is conspicuously alley-free.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 23, 2015 3:40 PM

The alley is a reminder of past visions of how to best lay out a city.  In the 19th century, back when Chicago started booming, the city was laid out in a grid and it quickly became a filthy, stinky, disease-ridden place. "Rear service lanes were essential for collecting trash, delivering coal, and stowing human waste — basically, keeping anything unpleasant away from living quarters."  As we have moved towards curvilinear residential streets and more discrete public utilities, the newer neighborhoods abandoned the alley, but they are still very prominent in old neighborhoods (click here for an interactive map to explore all of Chicago's alleys). 

Also, Chicago's suburbs have lofty names (Mount, Heights, Ridge, etc.)  that don't match this flat topography--read here to find out why.  


Tags: Chicago, urban, placetoponyms, planning, urbanism.

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Why Little Kids in Japan Are So Independent

Why Little Kids in Japan Are So Independent | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
In Japan, small children take the subway and run errands alone, no parent in sight. The reason why has more to do with social trust than self-reliance.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, October 7, 2015 7:38 AM

social trust

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:49 AM

If this happened in the United States, it would lead the cable news channels for about a year. Most Parents in our country will hardly ever let their small children leave the house, never mind actually be by themselves for a long time period. This video is an excellent showcase of the differences between western and eastern cultures. The eastern culture prioritize independence at an early age. They make a point of making sure that children can become self sustainable. In the west, we go to extraordinary links to shield our children from the ugliness of every day society. We are more fearful of the horrors that might occur to our children if we allow them to explore society. Neither approach can be judged as correct or wrong. They are just two different ways of raising children in a complex and often freighting world.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:27 PM

It's interesting to see the cultural differences that facilitate these drastically different parenting strategies held by the Japan and the United States. In the US, our capitalistic society puts every man on his own- we are told not to help others, nor to ask for help. From the treks we made across the continent to our reluctance, as a society, to accept welfare programs as a necessity in an industrialized democratic society, Americans strive for solitude and independence. There isn't a sense of community in many parts of the country, and as a result, we are less likely to trust one another- I remember reading about two parents being invested by Child Services because they allowed their 9 year old child to walk with his younger sister to school. To think that such attitudes could be held on such a large scale, as they are in Japan, is laughable. We are told as we grow up how unsafe we really are. In Japan, the community- the collective- is held as the ideal, and people are taught to be able to trust strangers, to expect the best from them. The result? A safer society and the perception that Japanese society as a whole is safer. Children are able to walk freely in public and not be afraid, and public transit and walking are more widely accepted in urban areas. Tokyo may or may not be the world's safest large city, but it certainly feels so for its inhabitants, and I fail to see how that isn't better than the fear Americans have for our neighbors. This is something we need to address as a society, and we should start by looking at our ally across the Pacific. 

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'Love locks' to be removed from Paris bridge

'Love locks' to be removed from Paris bridge | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The city of Paris will start removing padlocks from the Pont des Arts on Monday, effectively ending the tourist tradition of attaching 'love locks' to the bridge. For years, visitors have been attaching locks with sentimental messages to the bridge in symbolic acts of affection. Some further seal the deal by throwing keys into the Seine River below.  It was considered charming at first, but the thrill wore off as sections of fencing on the Pont des Arts crumbled under the locks' weight. The bridge carries more than 700,000 locks with an estimated combined weight roughly the same as 20 elephants."


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Leslie G Perry's curator insight, June 2, 2015 8:32 AM

I LOVE Seth Dixon's insight on this and how it figures in with Design Technology. What mark do we leave and why? What are the unintended consequences of leaving out mark?

 

Seth Dixon's insight:

Graffiti, tombstones, love locks, monuments...each of these are manifestations of people's desire to have some tangible impact on the landscape.  Something that manifests a connection to place in a profoundly personal way. 

 

Questions to Ponder: Why do people want leave a mark on places that are meaningful to them?  When do you think that they that these markers are appropriate or inappropriate?  Do we have more of a 'right' to mark some places than others? Why do many oppose these personal marks on the landscape?

Linda Denty's curator insight, June 4, 2015 8:32 PM

Great discussion point for your classes!  As Seth Dixon says why do people choose to leave a mark on certain places and is this appropriate?  Could people be doing something else that doesn't have such a deleterious effect on it's environment?  

CMuddGeo's curator insight, June 7, 2015 6:29 PM

This is understandable but very sad...

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Is Your Neighborhood Changing? It Might Be Youthification, Not Gentrification

Is Your Neighborhood Changing? It Might Be Youthification, Not Gentrification | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
One urban planning professor has defined this as a process that occurs in discrete stages.


Much has been made of the wave of millennials moving to cities. In intriguing new work, geographer and urban planner Markus Moos of the University of Waterloo gives the phenomenon a name: “youthification.” Moos defines youthfication as the “influx of young adults into higher density” cities and neighborhoods. And in some ways these neighborhoods are “forever young,” where new cohorts of young people continue to move in as families and children cycle out in search of more space.


Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic.


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Cass Allan's curator insight, February 17, 2015 7:45 PM

Changing neighbourhoods

ZiyCharMatt's curator insight, February 20, 2015 12:09 PM

This city talks about which cities in the United States have the largest amounts of young and old residents. This is important because those cities with large amounts of young people (like Austin) are likely to be on the cutting edge of innovation and it is those cities that we can look to to show the rest of the nation the future of urban design. I believe that this article is very interesting and provides a good insight into which parts of the country are advancing quickly and which parts are sating rooted in the past.

 

-Charles Bradbury

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 30, 2015 7:27 AM

Youthfication

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50 Years Ago, A Fluid Border Made The U.S. 1 Square Mile Smaller

50 Years Ago, A Fluid Border Made The U.S. 1 Square Mile Smaller | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Since Texas became a state, the Rio Grande has marked the border between the U.S. and Mexico. But, like rivers do, it moved. In 1964, the U.S. finally gave back 437 acres of land.

 

Ever since Texas became a state, the river has been the border between the two countries. But rivers can move — and that's exactly what happened in 1864, when torrential rains caused it to jump its banks and go south. Suddenly the border was in a different place, and Texas had gained 700 acres of land called the Chamizal (pronounced chah-mee-ZAHL), so named for a type of plant that grew there.

 

Tags: Mexico, migration, borders, political, place, podcast.   


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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 4, 2014 1:12 PM

This article highlights one of the problems of tying political boundaries to the physical environment. When the Rio Grande moved further south it was in the United States' favor, and they happily accepted the extra land, despite the complaints of Mexico. It wasn't until 100 years later when the US feared the potential of Mexico straying during the Cold War that they decided to handle the issue. This shows some of the issues that can arise when placing rigid political definitions on the fluid and changing landscape.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 5, 2015 2:15 PM

This article is highly interesting because it shows just how "obnoxious" the concept of a border (a man made concept) actually is.  I found it interesting that the border could move that much due to the Rio Grande flooding.  It seems to me that it was a hasty decision on the part of the politicians who set the Rio Grande as the border between the United States and Mexico.  I also found it interesting that how in the 1960's, the United States forced people out of their homes when they were going to cede the land back to Mexico.  Because it was part of an effort to keep them allied with the US during the Cold War.  Also, it was highly interesting how the US built a cement casing around the river to keep it from moving.  Like Trillo says at the end of the article, "There's only so much control a man can do on a river. Sooner or later...the river is gonna do what Mother Nature has taught it to do — to move."

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 21, 2015 10:08 AM

I find this absolutely fascinating; I have never heard of a border moving in such a way! The implications that this deal had for the residents of that disputed territory show the power that geography can have both on global politics and much closer to home. I also find it astounding that the Rio Grande was able to shift that much over the course of only 100 years. One square mile is an awful lot of ground to cover when one thinks of rivers as being relatively stationary- do all rivers shift in such a manner, or is the Rio Grande more active than normal in this regard? And if so, why? I wonder if there are any similar examples in other parts of the world where the fluidity of geography has impacted political boundaries in such a way, as I feel as though this is the first time I've come across this particular kind of story. A fantastic read, I highly recommend it.

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Beijing's Facelift

"A government-initiated redevelopment plan will transform one of the oldest neighborhoods in Beijing into a polished tourist attraction."


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Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 26, 2015 2:24 PM

In Beijing, China the government has plans to turn one of the oldest neighborhoods in Beijing, Gulou, to a tourist attracting. This is one of the only areas that the government did not knock down in the mass urbanization missions. Most of the residences here are poor and much of life is lived in public. Hopefully the tourist attraction will garnish money and jobs for the cities inhabitants. Large areas of the old broken down neighborhood will be turned into shops, hotels, and a museum. Inhabitants of the area to be knocked down will be moved to high rises on the outskirts of town. Some are mad and feel that the city should not be touched at all and that would be the correct way to preserve it as a historical sight.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 3, 2015 7:39 PM

Normally I am annoyed at projects that end up destroying history, but in this instance I think the area needs to be remodeled. Part of the reason I am not fazed by the history being lost is because a fair amount of the area was already so poorly kept that many of the structures were either ruble or dilapidated. At the rate the area was going, it was already going to lose its history anyways. While it would be nice of the government to keep a small portion of the good standing landscape, I think the museum being built in the area is a nod at maintaining there history. So since you can’t have it all, I would rather side with the government trying to raise the standard of living for people who have been in continuous abject poverty since about the 13th century. As you said before, invest something in an area and you typically get something in return. Plus it seems that most of the people angered by this move are those outside of the area being remodeled (i.e. historians). I personally think those people are farther removed from the actual decision then those living there. So once again, I am happy to side with the people being most affected by the poverty stricken land. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:27 AM

As a man who graduated with a Bachelor's degree in History,  it goes without saying that this causes me sadness.  But even taking the history component out of the picture, this reformation project is also destroying much of that area's culture and identity.  They are risking the few details that remain of their culture's past in order to move the area onto a more global scale.  Another negative is the fact that they are picking up the poverty-stricken residents of this community and shipping them to another part of town like they are pieces of livestock.

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Gentrification: Views From Both Sides of the Street

Gentrification: Views From Both Sides of the Street | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Despite the fact that Detroiters will get the benefits of newfound energy, enthusiasm, and even money, it's unrealistic to expect a group who is scared of the unknown and having power stripped away to welcome outsiders with open arms.

 

 BM: Detroit has been down in a slump for a while and with gentrification(adding people of wealthier income) into the the Midtown neighborhood of Detroit. Despite the wealth of income in Midtown the rest of the City still has an average income of around $28,000 which is pretty weak compared to Midtown's average income of $111,000. One could argue that this gentrification project is not going at the pace desired. Slow and steady...


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