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African borders

African borders | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"About the history of the creation of Africa borders and debates about African borders."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 4

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Tom Cockburn's curator insight, June 24, 2:46 AM

Borders here are Continuing to evolve

Darleana McHenry's curator insight, June 26, 4:33 AM

I thought that this was interesting and decided to share it.

 

Beatrice Sarni's curator insight, July 7, 12:36 AM

always an interesting discussion...

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Retronyms: Linguistic Shifts

Retronyms: Linguistic Shifts | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

A 'retronym' is a term specifying the original meaning of word after a newer meaning has overtaken it.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 3

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, May 2, 12:10 PM

Very interesting look at how language changes over time.  Examples:  landline, "friend IRL", and vinyl.

God Is.'s curator insight, May 3, 10:15 AM

Some of you might appreciate this article.. Darn I feel old! LOL

A.K.Andrew's curator insight, May 6, 5:32 PM

Fantastic images for our modern day terms.

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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 7:27 AM

This infographic was very interesting.  By using color coding it highlights the areas of influence the colonel powers still maintain over their old possessions.  This map is helpful in understanding how this affects the politics of theses regions today.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 9:59 AM

Colonial ties are still very prevalent due to Europe's dependence upon the resources of Africa. European countries like England and France invest billions in Africa, not to help those African nations, but to build infrastructure for resource extraction or to keep governments stable. Though the true exploitation of Africa has ended, the current situation certainly has the ring of exploitation as the people of Europe enjoy the diamonds and chocolate harvested by the multitudes of impoverished people of Africa.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 1:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

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When Did Peking Become Beijing and Persia Become Iran? We Have the Data

When Did Peking Become Beijing and Persia Become Iran? We Have the Data | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Where politics and language collide: how place names change over time.

Via Nancy Watson, Barry Cohen
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unit 3-4

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, May 27, 6:05 PM

What is in a name?

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Regional slang words

Regional slang words | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

How many of these 107 regional slang words do you use?  This week on Mental Floss' YouTube information session, author and vlogger John Green explains 107 slang words specific to certain regions.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2013 10:18 AM

This video is a great audio supplement to these maps that display regional variations of vocabulary terms. 


Tags: language, North America, regions, USA.

Justin McCullough's curator insight, September 18, 2013 12:43 PM

This is an interesting video explaining words heard in different parts of the country. The video displays not only the cultural diversity of America but also how difficult it is to learn the English language. Although I was born and raised in Rhode Island most of the terms I am familiar with are the ones from the south (my dad's from Texas/California) and Massachusetts (my mom's from Fall River Mass). However, I have always used bubbler, but dandle board....really?

Anyways this video is pretty entertaining and informing. 

Shelby Porter's comment, September 30, 2013 6:17 AM
This video is a very interesting way to see where a lot of our everyday vocabulary comes from. It gives us insight to the diversity in culture that America expresses. Now I can understand why it is so hard for many people to learn the English language, we have slang for everything, and a different slang word for each part of America. I am familiar with a lot of the terms, being a New England Native. Bubbler, wicked, soda, and cellar are some that are part of my everyday vocabulary (and unfortunately, being from Rhode Island sometimes the "R" seems to drop). It is amazing to see all the different words we have for just one thing and where they use them. It is just another great example of how widely diverse our country is.