AP Human Geography
8.5K views | +0 today
Follow
AP Human Geography
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why don't black and white Americans live together?

Why don't black and white Americans live together? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
In many parts of the US, Americans of different races aren't neighbours - they don't go to the same schools, they don't always have access to the same services.

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 7

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 9, 2016 9:11 PM

This article is filled with good geography (and more specifically AP Human Geography) vocabulary.  Redlining, blockbusting, and racial covenants are all discussed as spatial process that have shaped socioeconomic and racial characteristics in American cities. 

 

Tags: neighborhood, urban, socioeconomic, racepoverty, spatialhousing.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, February 2, 2016 9:30 AM

We have the same separation in DC. East of the River...

Pieter de Paauw's curator insight, February 15, 2016 6:22 AM

Segregatie in beeld

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore

These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
How vacant houses trace the boundaries of Baltimore's black neighborhoods.

 

The map on the left shows one very tiny dot for each person living in Baltimore. White people are blue dots, blacks are green, Asians are red and Hispanics yellow.The map on the right shows the locations of Baltimore City's 15,928 vacant buildings. Slide between the two maps and you'll immediately notice that the wedge of white Baltimore, jutting down from the Northwest to the city center, is largely free of vacant buildings. But in the black neighborhoods on either side, empty buildings are endemic.


Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, economic, race, poverty, spatial, housing.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 7

more...
Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, April 29, 2015 7:00 PM

Inequality 

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, May 24, 2015 9:14 PM

Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use

 

This article is about Sandtown, Baltimore and its shift into a disamenity sector. It explains how this neighborhood, mainly housed by blacks, had a high percentage of vacant houses. The article says that this neighborhood is overrun with poverty, war on drugs and gangs and has the more residents in jail than any other neighborhood. This shows the changing demographics of the city of Baltimore.

 

This relates to unit 7 because it covers the topic of disamenity sectors and changing demographics. It shows reasons for the high levels of poverty and abandoned housing. It also shows the racial spatial distribution of the neighborhood and its correlation to housing and development.  

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 1:46 AM

This article left me heart broken. The African American community in Baltimore is stuck in a deep poverty cycle, and it cannot seem to escape its impoverished past. Even now, the poverty in the area seems to just be getting worse. The problems of income disparity lead to more problems than just economic; they lead to social and political problems. Social unrest and injustice occurs as a result of the modern white flight. This article arose as a result of the death of Freddie Gray, whose death demonstrates a significant social issue that needs to be addressed: police brutality and the criminal targeting of the African American community. His death stems from the tremendously amounts of disparity in the city. Promoting investment in the inner city would definitely help alleviate the poverty in the area. The problem is getting people to invest.

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How Suburban Are Big American Cities?

How Suburban Are Big American Cities? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"What, exactly, is a city? Technically, cities are legal designations that, under state laws, have specific public powers and functions. But many of the largest American cities — especially in the South and West — don’t feel like cities, at least not in the high-rise-and-subways, 'Sesame Street' sense. Large swaths of many big cities are residential neighborhoods of single-family homes, as car-dependent as any suburb.

Cities like Austin and Fort Worth in Texas and Charlotte, North Carolina, are big and growing quickly, but largely suburban. According to Census Bureau data released Thursday, the population of the country’s biggest cities (the 34 with at least 500,000 residents) grew 0.99 percent in 2014 — versus 0.88 percent for all metropolitan areas and 0.75 percent for the U.S. overall. But city growth isn’t the same as urban growth. Three cities of the largest 10 are more suburban than urban, based on our analysis of how people describe the neighborhoods where they live."


Tags: urban, suburbs, housing, sprawl, planning, density.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 7

more...
Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:56 PM

Suburbanization in the United States has been a phenomenon for the past 60 or so years, and continues on to this day with massive highway transport systems centered around cars. Its no surprise with cheap suburban land and relatively easy commutes that many of the fastest growing cities in the US are seeing their growth largely in suburban areas, where many more people can afford to live than the big city.

Sammie Bryant's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:07 AM

This article accurately depicts the difference between a normal city 50 years ago and a city today, as well as the continuing spread of suburbanization. For example, Austin, the capital of texas, a hustling, bustling always busy area, is predominantly suburban. As cities and countries continue to advance and develop and its citizens become more successful and family oriented, suburban homes for families will become more needed than something smaller, like condos or studio apartments. As the needs of the cities change, the structure of the city changes as well. This applies to our final unit of APHUG: Cities and Urban Land Use.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:29 AM

Urbanization

Rescooped by Courtney Barrowman from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What you’d need to make in every county in America to afford a decent one-bedroom

What you’d need to make in every county in America to afford a decent one-bedroom | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The National Low Income Housing Coalition took those fair market rents and calculated how much a worker would have to earn per hour to cover such modest housing, if we assume a 40-hour work week and a 52-week year. They call this rate a "housing wage," and it is, unsurprisingly, much higher than the minimum wage in much of the country."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 6-7

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 26, 2014 3:59 PM

This article on the economic geography of housing is supplemented by this interactive map with county-level data. There are a lot of conversations that could stem from an analysis of this data.  Where are the housing prices highest?  How come?  This is a resource that could allow students to explore the economic geography of their own region and apply that local knowledge to understand processes throughout the United States.   


Tags:  housingeconomic, socioeconomic.