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Is Your Neighborhood Changing? It Might Be Youthification, Not Gentrification

Is Your Neighborhood Changing? It Might Be Youthification, Not Gentrification | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
One urban planning professor has defined this as a process that occurs in discrete stages.


Much has been made of the wave of millennials moving to cities. In intriguing new work, geographer and urban planner Markus Moos of the University of Waterloo gives the phenomenon a name: “youthification.” Moos defines youthfication as the “influx of young adults into higher density” cities and neighborhoods. And in some ways these neighborhoods are “forever young,” where new cohorts of young people continue to move in as families and children cycle out in search of more space.


Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic.


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Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 7:50 PM

As opportunities are continually found in big cities, so too are young people migrating to these prosperous cities. Culture in the youth population has been restructured with new ideas, open mindedness, freedom, and also how the city offers many comforts. They plan out their future in the city because it has so many amenities, with amazing transportation in between other areas. Expectations are raised because young people consider things in different perspectives. New urban developments such as old manufacturing buildings being converted into housing apartments offer the youth suitable living arrangements and accommodations. However, mature populations keep being displaced to the suburban areas, due to different expectations. Older people prefer more relaxation in their lives and they are not very interested in the most advanced technologies. As young people keep moving to the big cities, these highly populated areas have to structure new patterns to develop urban sections.

Cass Allan's curator insight, February 17, 7:45 PM

Changing neighbourhoods

ZiyCharMatt's curator insight, February 20, 12:09 PM

Youthifacation

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Why the ‘Coffee’ Words Are Not Cognates

Why the ‘Coffee’ Words Are Not Cognates | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"A former student of mine drew my attention to a recent article in Slate written by Alyssa Pelish and titled 'The Stimulating History of Coffee: Why You Hear This Word Around the World'."


Tags:  language, culture, diffusion.


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:10 PM

unit 3

Tyler Anson's curator insight, February 23, 10:41 AM

This article also shows the diffusion of language. The word "coffee' has diffused and although it is spelled differently in different languages, it pronounced in almost the exact same way. This goes to show how different languages most likely diffused from the same common ancestor langauge.

Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, February 24, 9:45 PM

The word "coffee" is a loan word that has been borrowed by languages for centuries. It is sometimes mistakenly called a cognate, but is actually a simple sound alike because it does not come from a common language root. A cognate always, always a word that comes from a common language root. "Coffee" is borrowed and does not meet the standards to be a cognate.


Words diffused along trade routes as people would  travel from place to place and share the names of items they wished to sell. Before reliable travel, the names would change from place to place as people remembered them differently or pronounced them differently according to the languages.

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-stan by your land

Central Asia is full of lands whose names end in -stan. A certain powerful North American country has a related name. How? It's not your standard explanation...

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Beatrice J. P. Vasconcelos's curator insight, January 8, 4:39 PM

Stand by me...

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 21, 7:21 AM

Summary- In this video, it explains way so many easter countries end in -stan. Pakistan, Turkistan, and Kyrgyzstan are all examples of this. Turns our, -stan is the persian word for country. Thats why all the countries neighboring Iran have all been influenced by this, with -stan as the last part of the country name. Iran also havs -stans within its borders as well. There are also places ending is -stan which aren't part of the origin 7 -stans. Independence movements, historical regions, and administrative regions and in -stan as well. 

 

Insight - In unit 3, one of the the main things we study is why are places named what they are and why do languages diffuse. In this case, all these places are named what they are because of the ethnic group living in that area is defying their territory as a state(country). I saw the -stan diffusion as a form of contagious diffusion. It kept spreading outward from Iran to a lot of states north east of it. 

Tyler Anson's curator insight, February 23, 10:37 AM

This video is cool because it shows the diffusion of name from one of the original languages of the world. It goes to show how all these countries in Asia end in -stan just because of what it means (loosely translates to "land"). This video shows the diffusion of language over time.

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7 of the Best Dialect Quizzes

7 of the Best Dialect Quizzes | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
If you're feeling particularly nationalistic, or just want to see how consistently you speak like your friends and neighbors, here are all the dialect quizzes that I could find. Find out what your dialect most resembles, and, in many cases, help science at the same time!

 

Tags: language, culture, English.


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Julia Kang's curator insight, November 6, 2014 8:42 PM

Enligsh dialects looks interesting! If I have a chance later, I want to know more about it :)

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Linguistic Family Tree

Linguistic Family Tree | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor. An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian).  Minna Sundberg, creator of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent, a story set in a lushly imagined post-apocalyptic Nordic world, has drawn the antidote to the boring linguistic tree diagram."


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Linda Denty's curator insight, November 9, 2014 7:31 PM

A really wonderful graphic.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 11, 2014 3:21 AM

Linguistic Family Tree

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:50 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Patterns and Processes (Language)

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Cultural Patterns and Food

"Berlin Bureau Chief Michael Slackman looks into the obsession with currywurst, a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder, and brings different Berliners together."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 24, 2014 8:43 AM

This short video has been added to the the interactive map, Place-Based Geography VideosThis depiction of street foods in German cities is a rich, tangible example to show cultural patterns and processes.  Currywurst is a unifying force across socioeconomic classes in Germany, but it is also a product of globalization and cultural interactions across regions.  Culture is not static and this New York Times video can be used to teach the various concepts of culture; per the updated APHG outline, the initial concepts of culture are:  

  • Culture traits
  • Diffusion patterns
  • Acculturation, assimilation and multiculturalism
  • Culture region, vernacular region, cultural hearth
  • Globalization and the effects of technology on culture.


Question to Ponder: How are these 5 major elements of culture seen in this video?


Tags: food, migration, culturediffusion, globalization, consumption, APHG.

Adriene Mannas's curator insight, September 25, 2014 8:00 PM

Unit 1! Culture

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The world as it is: The influence of religion

The world as it is: The influence of religion | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Seldom has it been more important for Americans to form a realistic assessment of the world scene. But our current governing, college-­educated class suffers one glaring blind spot.

Modern American culture produces highly individualistic career and identity paths for upper- and middle-class males and females. Power couples abound, often sporting different last names. But deeply held religious identities and military loyalties are less common. Few educated Americans have any direct experience with large groups of men gathered in intense prayer or battle. Like other citizens of the globalized corporate/consumer culture, educated Americans are often widely traveled but not deeply rooted in obligation to a particular physical place, a faith or a kinship."


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MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 2014 3:12 PM

APHG-U3

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 22, 2014 11:57 AM

Religion and its influence

Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, January 28, 12:17 PM

My APHUG students will read this article before even beginning our study of religion.  My hope is that this may at the very least help them empathize with the religious fervor that still has such a profound impact on the culture of much of the world.  

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Topography of Religion

Topography of Religion | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The Pew survey sorts people into major groupings--Christians; other religions, including Jewish and Muslim; and 'unaffiliated,' which includes atheist, agnostic and 'nothing in particular.'  Roll your cursor over the map to see how faiths and traditions break down by state."


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CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 7:09 PM

Awesome interactive map showing the relative religious composition of states.

Ignacio Quintana's curator insight, December 1, 2014 6:56 PM

Even though this is just an info-graphic, this is very interesting. What we can see from this map is the spatial organization of religion specifically in the U.S. It's interesting to see how protestant makes up the majority (but apparently not according to the article above this from Haak's page) and how drastically these views can change from coast to coast, and state to state. What I find particularly interesting is that you can clearly find hearths of many of these religions, for example, Utah has an extremely out-numbering amount of Mormons. For obvious reasons that is, but still very educational to see the centers of many of the big religions in the United States.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 8:46 PM

Looking at the map, it looks like the Northeast is predominately Catholic while the further South you go along the Eastern coast, you find more Protestants, mostly Evangelical, especially in the from Confederate States. The Mid and Northwest seems to hold a healthy mix of all the Christian denominations while places in the Southwest have a higher Catholic percentage, my guess would be from immigration from Mexico. The one odd ball out in the Southwest is Utah with its 58% of Mormons.

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The Origins Of The Shiite-Sunni Split

The Origins Of The Shiite-Sunni Split | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The division between Islam's Shiite minority and the Sunni majority is deepening across the Middle East. The split occurred soon after the death of the Prophet Muhammad, nearly 1,400 years ago.
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James Hobson's curator insight, October 27, 2014 9:08 AM

(SW Asia topic 8)

This article provides the 'Sparknotes' of the reasoning for the schism between Sunni and Shia. It all boils down to who was to succeed Mohammed: his bloodline or who the community elected? This quickly turned violent, bearing striking similarity to some of the religious martyrs -both good and bad-  we hear about today. Just think how much the world -especially that of today and Southwest Asia- would have changed if Mohammed had made known who he desired to take his position? It seems as if personal interpretation and sticking to one's faith, as with virtually all religions, is the only feasible solution for now. Though it does not answer the question and leaves a divide, history has proven that ultimately there does lie strength in diversity, and it will be interesting to see how this plays out as it pertains to Islamic sects in the near future.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 1:56 AM

Like many Americans while having heard Sunni and Shiite Islam before I wasn't quite sure what the difference was besides the fact it was seemingly enough to cause centuries of conflict. This article does a good job of providing background for Americans who find themselves distanced or simply poorly informed about the different sects of Islam. A good understanding of this is important especially today when we find ourselves entwined in the business and affairs of the Middle East.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:49 PM

While much of the sectarian violence in places like Iraq has been a result of intentional sabotage by extremist or insurgent forces, the deep historical nature of this split allowed these sparks of violence to become a heavy fight again. Islam is one religion, but the two sects are based on different interpretations of the faith. The two sects have coexisted in relative peace for some time, but the current conflict shows that the fundamental differences still create a huge divide between the sects.

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Retronyms: Linguistic Shifts

Retronyms: Linguistic Shifts | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

A 'retronym' is a term specifying the original meaning of word after a newer meaning has overtaken it.


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, May 2, 2014 3:10 PM

Very interesting look at how language changes over time.  Examples:  landline, "friend IRL", and vinyl.

God Is.'s curator insight, May 3, 2014 1:15 PM

Some of you might appreciate this article.. Darn I feel old! LOL

A.K.Andrew's curator insight, May 6, 2014 8:32 PM

Fantastic images for our modern day terms.

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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder.

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:03 PM

All over Germany specially in Berlin you can find many varieties of foods and restaurants that were influenced by many countries all over the world. A very popular dish the currywurst is fried German sausage with American ketchup and India curry powder. This dish was influenced by two other countries and was opular during WWII. The dish is still very popular today because of its unique taste. 

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:44 AM

This is a stride of different cultures,  a little ancient and modern culture. When the Turkish immigrant came over to Germany because they needed workers (Germans stopped having so many kids) it help form the curry wurst. They also use American ketchup because Americans were over there for the war and they ate this too. The curry powder came way of United Kingdom. Basically the population learned from all these cultures and  created one huge hit. 

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, October 26, 2014 11:23 AM

Unit 3

How are these 5 major elements of culture seen in this video?

1. Culture traits

2. Diffusion patters

3.Acculturation, assimilation, and multiculturalism

4. Culture region, vernacular region, cultural hearth

5. Globalization and the effects of technology on culture.

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Burka Avenger

"Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burka-clad superhero."


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 9:27 AM

This is great!  It is a cute animated trailer to the cartoon series the Burka Avenger!  She wears a burka to hide her identity which it certainly does, and then she kicks the bad guy’s butts!  A great gender reversal in this area, showing women can be a hero and stand up to men.  And she cleverly uses the restrictive clothing to keep her identity concealed. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:20 PM

unit 3

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 19, 2014 12:45 PM

There is something to be said about how film and the media can be used as an effective tool to touch on broad cultural ideals. On a related note, I will be attending a conference soon in Boston on social studies education and one of the seminars I will be going to is how to use SciFi movies in the classroom. Ideals like equality, fighting oppression and free speech are timeless and span many cultures, in Pakistan, the Burka Avenger is that area's media outlet to discuss key social topics to young people.

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Russian Orthodox believers mark Epiphany with icy plunge

Russian Orthodox believers mark Epiphany with icy plunge | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Thousands of members of the Russian Orthodox Church marked Epiphany on January 19 with a dip in freezing waters blessed by a cleric. Epiphany is a celebration of the baptism of Jesus Christ and the...

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Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 15, 2014 8:51 PM

These amazing images of members of the Russian Orthodox Church are very powerful. These individuals seem to have a great devotion to their religion ,to enter waters in these frigid conditions.I enjoyed viewing all of them. You can not help but be moved by their dedication. I can only imagine that they are moved as well and that this numbs the cold.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 20, 2014 6:57 PM

(Russia topic 2)

This frigid act of faith can be seen as both a form of extreme religious devotion, as well as a great opportunity to put a dare on a friend! Though perhaps more religious in this example, it still bears many similarities to the "penguin plungers" that run into Narragansett Bay every New Years Day. Both are, in their own ways at least, symbolic of something new and offer a sudden rush (whether it be a rush of spirituality or rush of adrenaline!). From the photos and my interpretation, it looks like this could catch on more widely in the Russian region as a secular event just like here in the United States. Not that I would go in beyond my tiptoes myself!, but it seems to have the same thrill factor as the more recent ice-bucket challenge.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 15, 2014 6:44 PM

Not only is this an interesting look at the religious practices of the Russian Orthodox church but also the fact religion has made such a rebound in the former communist nation. Russia has a religious tradition spanning centuries which was almost stomped out of the country during the leadership of Joseph Stalin. Stalin and the other communist officials saw religion as both a weakness and a possible problem leading to political insurrection. Because of this they closed churches and arrested priests. After the Soviet Union's demise in the late early 90's the Orthodox Church has undergone a revitalization and is regaining it's role in Russian society.   

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10 American English Words and Phrases British Expats Eventually Adopt

10 American English Words and Phrases British Expats Eventually Adopt | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
As a British expat who has lived and worked in the U.S. for over five years, I remain very much in favor of embracing the various wonderful nuances this country has to offer. However, there was one aspect of my move that—during the initial settling-in period—I secretly feared: the gradual Americanization of my vocabulary.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 8, 4:21 PM

While this list was created for English speakers in the UK, I will invert the list to show some terms that Americans rarely use, even if we understand their meaning: rubbish, mobile, motorway, petrol, car park, you lot, maths, pavement, football and fizzy drink.  If this interests you so will this list of 10 British insults that American don't understand


Tags: language, culture, English, UK.

tentuseful's comment, January 17, 4:16 AM
Thats stunning
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Why the ‘Coffee’ Words Are Not Cognates

Why the ‘Coffee’ Words Are Not Cognates | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"A former student of mine drew my attention to a recent article in Slate written by Alyssa Pelish and titled 'The Stimulating History of Coffee: Why You Hear This Word Around the World'."


Tags:  language, culture, diffusion.


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:15 PM

unit 2

Tyler Anson's curator insight, February 23, 10:41 AM

This article also shows the diffusion of language. The word "coffee' has diffused and although it is spelled differently in different languages, it pronounced in almost the exact same way. This goes to show how different languages most likely diffused from the same common ancestor langauge.

Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, February 24, 9:45 PM

The word "coffee" is a loan word that has been borrowed by languages for centuries. It is sometimes mistakenly called a cognate, but is actually a simple sound alike because it does not come from a common language root. A cognate always, always a word that comes from a common language root. "Coffee" is borrowed and does not meet the standards to be a cognate.


Words diffused along trade routes as people would  travel from place to place and share the names of items they wished to sell. Before reliable travel, the names would change from place to place as people remembered them differently or pronounced them differently according to the languages.

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11 Signs Your Hood Is Being Gentrified

11 Signs Your Hood Is Being Gentrified | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A Washington, D.C., resident describes the changes and privilege that have moved into her longtime neighborhood.


Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic, Washington DC.


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Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 6, 12:01 AM

www.bharatemployment.com

 

Brian Wilk's curator insight, January 31, 10:07 PM

This woman shares her thoughts on gentrification of a neighborhood, but instead of espousing the benefits, stays almost exclusively negative and stereotypes not only the people who live there, but her presumption of the "type" of people who will move in. Gentrification should mean a blending of the neighborhood to become more diverse and inclusive. Janelle opines that the area will get exclusively "whiter" and that law enforcement will improve, lighting will improve, liquor stores will change their name to wine & spirit stores all the while implying that this is a bad thing. True, the memories and culture that existed before gentrification will fade, but the upside of lower crime and a more diverse culture surely trumps that. I would like to poll the neighborhood and see what the reaction would be to lower crime and better housing availability, not to mention higher prices for homes which would build equity. If Janelle was looking to open some eyes, she did with me, perhaps she should be more accepting and see things a little differently through her eyes. Education never stops teaching....

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 2, 5:20 PM

Gentrification is the social equivalent of secondhand smoke, drifting across class lines” (Is Gentrification all bad?). It is all dependent on class status. On one side it can be a venomous and the other side can provide relief. The impact of gentrification on communities has been extraordinarily healthy for their residents, but the other side has been harmful for communities to maintain budgets with extremely high bills to pay. Another negative factor is that most of the time all this occurs within low-income communities. For some people change is hard to commit. Individuals are creatures of habit and some of them are reluctant to give up on their lifestyle. However, gentrification forces communities to relocate due to high prices and low income. In some cases, moving to the next level can be considered an accomplishment that one makes in their lives. However, when you have the earnings to devote to this type of commitments it will not be difficult to achieve.  However, when you need to survive on only a small income, your priorities change and keep away from gentrification.

 

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City of Endangered Languages

"New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world."


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I will be showing this in class DO NOT use it for your scoop it review--

 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 2, 2014 8:28 PM

This is an excellent video for showing the diffusion of languages in the era of migration to major urban centers.  It also shows the factors that lead to the decline of indigenous languages that are on the fringe of the global economy and the importance of language to cultural traditions.   Here is the article related to the video as well as a BBC article that calls NYC a 'graveyard of languages.'  In a curious twist on the topic of endangered languages, there is a group of Native Americans in Northern California that wouldn't mind seeing their language die out with this generation.  


Tagslanguage, folk cultures, culturediffusionNYC, video.

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, November 4, 2014 4:30 PM

Is globalisation enabling the preservation and study of declining languages?

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Decoding The Food And Drink On A Day Of The Dead Altar

Decoding The Food And Drink On A Day Of The Dead Altar | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The Mexican tradition celebrates the dead and welcomes their return to the land of the living once a year. Enticing them to make the trip is where the food, drink and musical offerings come in."


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 15, 2014 10:35 PM

In Mexico, Day of the Dead, or as Mexicans call it, Dia de Los Muertos, is celebrated on November 1st and 2nd in honor of all those who has passed. Alters are set up with different foods and beverages. Usually, the alter is set with sugar skulls and tamales. The colorful designs represent the vitality of life and individual personality. This tradition was created over 3,000 years ago by the Aztecs. It was created because they believed that one should not grieve over the loss of a loved one, but instead they should celebrate. We should welcome the returns of their spirits and this is where the food, drinks, and offerings come in. Hayes Lavis, cultural arts curator, says that we should not cry tears because it might make our ancestors paths slippery. He describes this as a joyous occasion for all members of the family, whether they are dead or alive. Items on the alter all have special meanings. As stated before, sugar skulls are one item on the alter. The skulls get decorated with lots of color and detail and are given as gifts. As for food on the alter, it usually includes a sampler of the ancestor's favorites. Alcohol is also included to do a toast to the ancestors. Another interesting fact is that monarch butterflies seem to flutter over to the alters around this time of the year. This was a representation of the ancestors coming to visit. To top off the alter, photographs of the ancestors were also included. It is a beautiful celebration that in recognized every year in Mexico.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, February 4, 7:36 PM

Dias de los Muertos is one of my favourite holidays I don't celebrate. Ever since high school Spanish class, I've been fascinated with the tradition. On my trip to Arizona in the summer of 2013, I picked up a skeleton mariachi band display to place on my nightstand. (Which the TSA was most interested in as it was wrapped tightly in tons of newspapers.) One of the things that struck me about the holiday was the celebration of death and the acceptance of mortality. I was first shocked at the idea that this was a time to flock to your relatives' tombstones and have dinner at them and party in a cemetery but the more I thought about it, it made sense. Death is something that happens to everyone and accepting and celebrating the life of the person makes more sense than grieving them. 

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, February 12, 6:39 PM

I've always been really interested in the Day of the Dead, and this article actually taught me a lot.  I always knew the general meaning of the day, and what they had and did, because I learned about it throughout high school in my Spanish classes, but this article shed some new light.  I never knew what exactly each element stood for, and now it's even more interesting to me.  I never would have guessed that there was Catholic influence, and that it is still incorporated today.  I think this is a beautiful ceremony, and a fantastic way to honor loved ones who have passed, and it certainly seems better than spending three hours at a funeral crying.  Their lives should be celebrated, and made out to be something happy and beautiful, instead of dark and depressing.

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13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world

13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The transition from childhood to adulthood -- the 'coming of age' of boys who become young men and girls who become young women -- is a significant stepping stone in everyone’s life. But the age at which this happens, and how a child celebrates their rite of passage into adolescence, depends entirely on where they live and what culture they grow up in.  Looking back, we'll never forget the majesty that was prom, or the excitement of hitting the dance floor at our friends' co-ed Bar and Bat Mitzvah parties, and why should we? Embarassing or amazing, they were pivotal moments in our lives that deserve remembering. On that note, here are thirteen of it the world’s most diverse coming of age traditions."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, culture, indigenous, worldwide.


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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, September 29, 2014 5:04 PM

Love seeing the many different traditions that people do when coming of age and also traditions in general. Growing up living in the United States my family still followed the many traditions they had where they came from. Both my parents are from Colombia and they brought down many of there family traditions and also world wide Spanish traditions also. For example, my sweet 15 was a very memorable tradition that many young Spanish girls have once they turn 15. Its a big celebration and festivities that are all very much traditional for us. Its interesting learning the traditions others have and learning about new places.

Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, October 3, 2014 3:07 AM
Its interesting to see the different cultural traditions that are set at different stages in a persons life as the beginning into adulthood for most. I don't think I would want to be a male in the Brazilian Amazon, or the island of Vanuatu where you literally put your life on the line to prove your ready for adulthood. It shows the differences and what is considered important or the role the person plays in society. I think the mention of the sweet 16 for American girls was a pretty weak presentation. America is a melting pot and represents so much more than that.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 11:59 AM

These traditions reflect the cultural geographies they take place within. In the Brazilian Amazon, the locals use the bullet ants native to the area to use in their Bullet Ant Initation. On North Baffin Island, where Inuits must be able to navigate and hunt in the wilderness of the artic, their coming of age involves a hunting journey that begins with them opening up the lines of communication between men and animals a relationship that the survival of the community hinges on. In the Amish tradition, they send their youth out into the world to witness the perils of modern society as a way to provide them with the choice of Amish Living. In Central and South America, girls have a Quinceanera where they girls solidifies their commitment to her family and faith two very important ideals of that culture. These coming of age traditions reflect the cultural differences between places throughout the world.

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Stop Complaining About Gentrification Unless You Know What It Is

Stop Complaining About Gentrification Unless You Know What It Is | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"In many cities, it's become popular to hate 'gentrifiers,' rich people who move in and drive up housing prices -- pushing everyone else out. But what's going on in these rapidly-changing urban spaces is a lot more complicated than that."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 28, 2014 2:02 PM

Gentrification can be a very touchy subject.  What appears to be economic revitalization of a down-trodden neighborhood to one, can appear to be systematic removal of minorities to another.  This op-ed isn't a whole-hearted embrace of gentrification, but it might be seen as a critique of the gentrification critics.

  

Tags: neighborhood, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economic.

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Gendered Cultural Narratives

Gendered Cultural Narratives | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"As a Muslim woman who chooses to wear hijab,I'd like to apologize for this poster, to my non-hijab wearing cohorts. http://pic.twitter.com/IoLfDPEGx7”;


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unit 3 and 6 Why is this viewed as inflammatory by some?

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:02 PM

APHG-U3

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 12:17 PM

The hijab is an item of clothing that represents the cultural and social outlooks of women in many Muslim or Middle Eastern societies. Many believe that women are meant to be covered up in order to remain pure and unaffected by the world. This piece of propaganda is meant to convince people of the differences between women with and without hijabs, and also the idea that one religion or belief remains much more pure than the other. The woman without the hijab is depicted with long flowing wild hair and with an unwrapped candy bar covered in dead flies. The woman wearing the hijab is presented by a wrapped candy bar, unaffected by the outside. You could also say that this veiled woman represents the purity of Islam while the non-hijab woman represents other religions are poisonous, evil, and overly focused on lust. Religious propaganda is incredibly powerful and can have lasting effects on the people of a society. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 14, 2014 8:51 PM

This poster is being used as a jab to no hijab wearing woman by depicting them as unwrapped candy that is covered in bugs and has a bite taken out of it, which is to say they are used and infested. While woman wearing Hijabs are depicted as sheltered and pure. The poster is a symbol of the country in which it originated and their view of how a woman should represent herself.

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Family Stones Pakistani Woman to Death in 'Honor Killing' Outside Court - NBC News

Family Stones Pakistani Woman to Death in 'Honor Killing' Outside Court - NBC News | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
LAHORE, Pakistan - A 25-year-old woman was stoned to death by her family outside one of Pakistan's top courts on Tuesday in a so-called "honor" kil...

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European word translator

European word translator | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Translate any word from English to more than 30 other European languages, on a map

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Melissa Marshall's curator insight, April 9, 2014 10:23 PM

This is a fantastic resource for seeing how words have changed according to geography. Type a word into the box and see it translated directly on to a map in more than 30 languages. Great for teaching kids about regions of language, or asking how they think a certain country came to use a certain word. 

Mick D Kirkov's curator insight, April 11, 2014 3:43 AM

Haha, hehe, hihi, or Ho-ho-ho! Maybe even huhuhuy!

Helen Rowling's curator insight, April 17, 2014 4:57 PM

English; Toursim; Geography

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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


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Olivia G Torres's curator insight, November 30, 2014 6:18 PM

This was super awesome!! It's a diagram that lets you zoom into the branches that are religion. Its really cool to see how different religions derived and how some are connected. I think it's really cool to see how many different branches have been made through out the years and just how far back religions went. I really like that you can see the long and sometimes lost roots of the religion.

Abby Laybourn's curator insight, December 10, 2014 1:25 PM

Although this was kind of hard to read it was interesting to see how different religions are related and where they stem from. 

Marita Viitanen's curator insight, January 31, 6:48 PM

Tämä puu jotakuinkin hämmentää...

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France bans popular English expressions

France bans popular English expressions | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
France declares war on the English language. Erin Burnett reports....

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Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:16 PM
A war on banning American-English phrases? Obviously France didn’t get the memo about the growing global community, either that, or they are choosing to fight it tooth and nail (Whoa. Too many puns). The world today is more united then ever, whether it be economically, politically, or socially; everyone is connected somehow. We share everything; the whole world is sitting around eating sushi, wearing Northface jackets made in Bangladesh, watching their country’s version of The Voice (a show of Dutch origin), and i-chatting someone across the world. Needless to say, the world has become a very small place.
France has become known as a country that is steeped in tradition. The French are very sensitive about every part of their culture, and try very hard to preserve it. But why would they reject words that, yes, have American-English origins, but have distinct meanings across the world? I’d say that it’s just another attempt at the French to combat outside influence, and most notably, deter its society away from all things American. Let’s see how they feel the next time we change our language to include freedom fries! Ha-ha
Sylvain Rotillon's comment, May 5, 2013 5:44 PM
It's not so simple ! You can't say "the French" as if everybody rejects english words. It's a national policy but in fact it's mainly a rearguard action denied everyday in the street.
Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:39 PM

I think that language chances as culture changes, as time passed things get more modern. For example the past summer I went back to Dominican Republic, I haven’t been there for almost eight years. Even though I kept in contact with my family over there, I was very shock to find how much the Spanish that I knew in Dominican Republic have change so much. I don’t think is possible to keep a language pure, society is not the same as 100 years ago, I bet that certain words that were correct in the English dictionary don’t even exist anymore.