AP Human Geography
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Mapping Migration in the United States

Mapping Migration in the United States | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
An interactive map showing nationwide migration patterns in the United States since 1900.

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 2

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Megan Becker's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:01 PM

Summary: This interactive map from the New York Times shows where people in each state are born, highlighting the growing internal migration in the United States alone. For example, only a small percentage of people living in Florida were actually born there, while the majority of Louisiana residents were born there.

 

Insight: I think this is an interesting map mostly because of it's interactive feature, in that you can see how internal migration has drastically changed since 1900. It relates to unit 2 in that migration patterns are always changing, whether they be internal or external. 

Mrs. Madeck's curator insight, October 1, 2015 5:55 PM

Migration

Peyton Conner's curator insight, October 30, 2015 10:18 AM

I believe this is a very interesting article that shows just how diverse migration is in the United State today. I especially liked the idea of seeing how migration has changed from 1900 to 2012. This map could easily be used to infer why people migrate in the United States.PC

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From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Today's volume of immigrants, in some ways, is a return to America’s past.

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 2

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 4, 2015 6:56 PM

This article was very interesting to look at. I had knowledge that the majority of the immigrant population came from Mexico but it gave a different perspective to see it on a map. The one aspect that caught my attention was how the map of the United States looked like in 1910. The majority of the immigrants back then came from Europe, mainly Germany. Germany was the top country birth among U.S. immigrants because it was very dominating. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 5, 2015 2:12 PM

Many people in 2015 feel that immigration-reform is an absolute must for America.  They usually use words like, "illegal", "terrorists", or "welfare-recipients" to try and scare the rest of the country into thinking immigration has spiraled out of control.  Immigration definitely has a different make-up from a hundred years ago, but that doesn't equate to it being a problem.

 

An article like this puts much into perspective.  What most naive and ignorant immigration-reformers might not now before reading this article is that the proportion of our current population has a fewer percentage of immigrants than back in 1910.  This fact is totally opposite from the picture that some critics try to draw, essentially, comparing immigration to millions of fire-ants invading our country.

 

Most immigrants now come from Latin America, whereas, in 1910 they came from Germany.  By reading the article, common sense will tell you that there might be more of a "racism" problem than an "immigration" problem in America.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, September 16, 2015 1:03 PM

Its interesting to me how the primary source of immigrants only shifts from Germany to Mexico in the 1990's, as opposed to when the country was cut in half in the fifties or during WWII. I had always thought that those events would limit German immigration more, however it appears that the primary reason for the shift is more due to the recent (relatively) drug war which erupted in Mexico.

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Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together

Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other.


Via Seth Dixon, Dennis V Thomas
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

Unit 4 but used in class-- cannot be used for scoop it summary activity!

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Noel Magee's curator insight, April 11, 2015 8:07 PM

This short, simple depiction of gerrymandering serves a strong message. Congressional districts have literally been turned into a jigsaw puzzle. While we can all agree that it is nice to have votes in our own favor, it is unfair to allow political parties to divide up the United States unfairly. It is imperative that such an important decision be fair and justifiable. For the good or our nation, gerrymandering needs to be controlled. When it comes to elections, the United States should be divided fairly and properly. Any altering of the district lines should be considered unethical, immoral, and should be made known to the public so they can decide what should be done. This type of decision affects every single individual living in America, and this should be the least of our worries. It may be beneficial to political parties at the time, but the changing of these should be an eye opener of the type of congressional "leaders" that we look to to make executive decision regarding the rest of our lives. 

 

*Module 7

Alexa Earl's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:51 PM

This showed me how unfair gerrymandering is and how it is a total false representation of what the people want. This diagram not only showed me how it works but it also showed me how it is so unfair...

Kristen Trammell's curator insight, May 26, 2015 7:36 PM

I. Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other. In this puzzle, the user has to place the congressional districts onto the state/county. 

 

II. I liked this puzzle. I thought it illustrated the oddity of the redrawn districts and highlighted the unfairness of the voting system. The weird shapes of the districts showed how hard the political officials would try to get a voting area where they would be supported. The unfairness is also illustrated with the idea that the congressional districts can be put into a puzzle, where a fair district would be shaped like rectangles or equally sized squares. 

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State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map?

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers.  Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers."


Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, regions, gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, density.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 4

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America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts

America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A brief overview of crimes against geography in the 113th Congress.

Via Seth Dixon, Barry Cohen
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 4

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Clarissa Rangel's curator insight, May 28, 2014 9:02 PM

Ways humans in power fiddle with POLITICAL lines to guarantee their future gains. 

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 10:04 AM

This concept is used to favor certain political parties in certain areas. There are rules like the ditrict has to be all connected but they can manipulate the redrawing to make it that a certain party still wins that district.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:29 PM

A showing of the gerrymandering districts of the most absurd kind.

Gerrymandering bases itself off the place of the districts in an attempt to sway voting in favor of one party or another or even for the most equal by dealing with similar human characteristics.