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The 9 biggest myths about ISIS

The 9 biggest myths about ISIS | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
If you want to understand the Islamic State, better known as ISIS, the first thing you have to know about them is that they are not crazy. Murderous adherents to a violent medieval ideology, sure. But not insane.

Via Seth Dixon
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Units 3 & 4

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James Hobson's curator insight, October 6, 3:15 PM

(in-class 2 - ISIS)

This is a great education tool in the sense that data is provided in a relatively OBJECTIVE manner / just the facts. The reader is allowed to make their own opinions and conclusions.
Of that which is notable is that ISIS is not a group of disorganized rebels; rather, it is a highly organized, thought-through, structured military force. It bears some shocking resemblance to national armies, including that of the U.S., in this manner.
Also, supporters of ISIS aren't necessarily extremists. Some support it in hopes of having a new political power which would be beneficial to them. Though religion is obviously involved, politics has been a major contributor to their success.
Lastly, I was surprised that up until very recently (right before the current crisis), ISIS was a subdivision of Al-Qaeda. Even more shocking is the reason why they aren't any longer: Head Al-Qaeda officials said ISIS was being 'too violent' towards civilians. (How ironic!) A group even more extreme than Al-Qaeda is definitely something worth having knowledge about, because (although it is clichéd), knowledge of the enemy is power over them.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 6, 3:28 PM

I was interested to read the 9 myths that are associated with ISIS. Some of the myths stated were very surprising.There is so much information being passed around about this terror organization that it is hard to differentiate the truth with myth.Some of the myths that surprised me were:

Myth #3: ISIS is part of al-Qaeda.

The fact that this group was split  off from al-Qaeda for being to violent was not something that is openly talked about.

Myth #6: ISIS is afraid of female soldiers.

Isis soldiers are not afraid of fighting female soldiers however they do believe if they are killed by a woman then they will not go to paradise.

 

It is important to know all the information about this topic and to be well informed on the issues.

 

 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 6, 3:45 PM

This website helps to dispel many of the myths and misunderstandings about ISIS. The group is a surprisingly complex amalgamation of many different, smaller groups and nationalities that has sprung out of the recent events in the region. While the group is a result of modern developments in the area, it is still firmly based on an older history, like the ancient Sunni/Shia divide and the old Islamic Caliphate. The group is brutal in its methods because it is still competing with other terrorist/insurgent groups in the area, and brutality is one of the few messages they all understand. Intervention by more powerful Western militaries can certainly help in the fight against ISIS, but it is not the final answer. For most Americans it is easy to see ISIS as the new al-Qaida, but the reality is a very complex situation with no easy answers, and it has a long way to go until it’s resolved.

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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 2013 10:02 AM

This interactive on refugees is especially timely, given that the Syrian civil war has created refugee situations in many of the neighboring countries.  One of my favorite elements of the Guardian's interactive is that they provide the raw data, so students can create their own maps with the same high quality data.  Equally important, this interactive shows the regional power bases of all the various factions of the Syrian rebellion that is seeking to overthrow the Assad regime.  The political conflict has huge demographic implications.    

Tags: refugees, Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:25 AM

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 12:16 PM

unit 2

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Iraq's Current Devolution

"A radical fringe Islamic group names ISIS is fighting to establish a extremist Islamic state in Iraq and Syria...and beyond. They control eastern Syria, western Iraq, just took control of Iraq's 2nd largest city of Mosul and are advancing on the capital Baghdad.  In this podcast, the professor John Boyer outlines just a few of the contributing factors to why this significant event is taking place, the geographic/historic background of the state, and the consequences for the future of the region."


Via Seth Dixon
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unit 4

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 18, 8:41 AM

If you haven't yet discovered John Boyer, a.k.a. the Plaid Avenger,  I recommend exploring his site.  He has numerous resources for world regional geography and current global affairs.  His colorful persona is highly entertaining for college age-students as his class attracts over 3,000 students each semester (you can decide for yourself whether that personality works for you and your classroom).  This particular 'plaidcast' discussion focuses on Iraq's current devolution and possible total collapse. 


Tags: SyriaIraq, MiddleEast, conflict, political, geopoliticsborders, colonialism, devolution.

Michael Mazo's curator insight, October 6, 3:04 PM

Iraq's position in regards to the militant groups has steadily affected the countries global and economic status in more ways than one. As these militant groups such as ISIS continue to grow then so will their territory and intensity of self-less acts. Not only are these groups a disease to the world but they affect the way our global economy works. ISIS controls oil fields and vast amounts of land in Iraq, Syria and other middle-eastern countries. In my opinion, America's decision to fire airstrikes onto these militant groups could be both good and bad. Good because it will decrease the amount of ISIS members but bad because it could be an incentive for ISIS to cause further damage and chaos in reference to revenge. At this pace, ISIS and other such groups will gain claimed territory in which will come at the cost of innocent lives of women and children. They must be stopped before issues get worse.

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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's insight:

unit 2

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 2013 10:02 AM

This interactive on refugees is especially timely, given that the Syrian civil war has created refugee situations in many of the neighboring countries.  One of my favorite elements of the Guardian's interactive is that they provide the raw data, so students can create their own maps with the same high quality data.  Equally important, this interactive shows the regional power bases of all the various factions of the Syrian rebellion that is seeking to overthrow the Assad regime.  The political conflict has huge demographic implications.    

Tags: refugees, Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:25 AM

via gduboz