AP Human Geography
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The Staggering Wealth Of Mexico City

The Staggering Wealth Of Mexico City | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Walk on the streets and you´ll be exposed to its informal economy: people who do what they can to eke out a living including washing windshields, selling food, or even singing, dancing, and performing acrobatics for a tip.

What Americans may not know is that Mexico City is home to the wealthiest people, the poshest neighborhoods, the most exclusive shops, entertainment venues, and cultural centers on the planet.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 1, 2016 12:57 PM

Mexico City has been the economic center of Mexico for a long time and is a true primate city. "Wealth accumulation in Mexico City has historically been concentrated in the hands of a few. In colonial times, the elite was mostly composed of Spanish-born immigrants who held high-ranking offices or worked as business owners or export-oriented merchants. Later, the wealthy were those who owned large estates known as haciendas…It is estimated that around 40 percent of Mexico’s income is owned by just 10 percent of its population, while 52.3 percent of Mexican citizens live in poverty."

 

Tags: urban, megacitieseconomic, labor, Mexico.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 30, 2016 8:13 PM

Contrasts found in large cities 

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Decoding The Food And Drink On A Day Of The Dead Altar

Decoding The Food And Drink On A Day Of The Dead Altar | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The Mexican tradition celebrates the dead and welcomes their return to the land of the living once a year. Enticing them to make the trip is where the food, drink and musical offerings come in."


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Rachel Phillips's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:39 PM

I've always been really interested in the Day of the Dead, and this article actually taught me a lot.  I always knew the general meaning of the day, and what they had and did, because I learned about it throughout high school in my Spanish classes, but this article shed some new light.  I never knew what exactly each element stood for, and now it's even more interesting to me.  I never would have guessed that there was Catholic influence, and that it is still incorporated today.  I think this is a beautiful ceremony, and a fantastic way to honor loved ones who have passed, and it certainly seems better than spending three hours at a funeral crying.  Their lives should be celebrated, and made out to be something happy and beautiful, instead of dark and depressing.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 1, 2015 10:17 PM

This is such a neat tradition.  I love all the vibrant colors and the fact that its a joyous celebration instead of mourning which is traditional in the US.  There is even an animated movie that was just released called Book of the Dead.  Its only taken decades for movie giants to release animated films that reflect the population of the US.  I can remember when Pocahontas was released then Mulan.  

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 9:29 PM

I love reading about Mexico's day of the dead tradition because it is a piece of Mexico's culture that is only Mexico's. It is such a strong piece that they take very seriously, it has not been  Americanized and is original to them. It is like the Muslim Hajj pilgrimage, a specific component of Muslim tradition. Many cultures have been muddled with since the dawn of globalization.

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20150929000378

The above link is an interesting read about how globalization affects traditions.

Reading this article is proof that some traditions are to strong to break. Learning about specific customs like the day of the dead also gives you a great opportunity to learn a vast amount about the populations culture and beliefs.

I

 

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Will American Pot Farmers Put the Cartels out of Business?

Will American Pot Farmers Put the Cartels out of Business? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
They've driven prices so low that Mexican growers are giving up.


For the first time ever, many of the farmers who supply Mexican drug cartels have stopped planting marijuana, reports the Washington Post. "It's not worth it anymore," said Rodrigo Silla, a lifelong cannabis farmer from central Mexico. "I wish the Americans would stop with this legalization."  Facing stiff competition from pot grown legally and illegally north of the border, the price for a kilogram of Mexican schwag has plummeted by 75 percent, from $100 to $25.


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Chris Costa's curator insight, September 21, 2015 10:16 AM

I expect that one day, anti-marijuana legislation will be talked about in classrooms in much the same manner that prohibition is talked about today. Legalization movements are sweeping the country, with two states already legalizing it for recreational use and basking in the additional tax income. I remember reading that Colorado is actually planning on giving some of the excessive revenue gathered from taxes on marijuana back to citizens- if that is not enough evidence for those opposed to legalization that the benefits of legalizing the drug FAR outweigh the potential drawbacks, than I can only point to these developments in Mexico as further proof. Cartels cannot keep up with US pot growers, and are suffering as a result. Although this could potentially lead to increased violence in the States as cartels push northwards, the nation-wide legalization of the drug would do more to weaken the cartels than billions of dollars in funding for the DEA has ever done. The War on Drugs has already shown how ineffective a policy it really is. Why not give the people the power to choose for themselves what they may put in their bodies within the privacy of their home?. God knows we could use the additional revenue to help schools! Legalize it!

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:37 AM

there is also a negative side affect on this and that is now that planting marijuana is not making any money for the growers it is time to move to bigger and more dangerous stuff. The united states though the government  will not admit to, has a major drug usage problem and so it would be time to bring in another form of drug to make a profit. every so often there is something new that pops up on the streets and Americans want to experience them.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:51 PM

Events that we think of as local (Washington and Colorado legalizing marijuana use) have national and global implications, especially in a globalized economy.  This article is but one example of why geographers try to approach every issue at a variety of scales to more fully comprehend the ramifications and ripple effects of any given phenomenon. 

 

Tags: Mexiconarcoticsscale

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Interactive Education Comic/App

A graphic novel to entertain, excite, and educate…and with an experimental interactive comic app as well! Plaid power to the people!


Looking to teach geography and world affairs with a flair?  The Plaid Avenger has a new interactive comic book to teach about the geography of Mexico and the geopolitical impacts of the the drug wars in that country.  If you've received some value from his work in the past, please consider supporting this endeavor which is pushing the boundaries of educational technologies and platforms.  


Tags: Mexico, geography education, edtech, narcotics.


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Plate Tectonics and the Formation of Central America and the Caribbean

This animation is made from a time series of maps reconstructing the movements of continental crust or blocks, as South America pulled away from North America, starting 170 million years ago. Note that South America is still clinging to Africa at the beginning of the series.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 22, 2015 4:37 PM

The land bridge connecting North and South America is hardly permanent (on a geological time scale that is).  This video is an animated version of the still maps from this article.  


Tags: Mexico, tectonicsphysical, video, Middle America.

Sameer Mohamed's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:54 AM

The intriguing thing about this video is that it puts into perspective the amount of time that humans have been on this earth. In in less than a million years we have gone from not existing to shaping the ground that we walk on.

s stout's curator insight, June 8, 4:45 PM
Unit 1
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50 Years Ago, A Fluid Border Made The U.S. 1 Square Mile Smaller

50 Years Ago, A Fluid Border Made The U.S. 1 Square Mile Smaller | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Since Texas became a state, the Rio Grande has marked the border between the U.S. and Mexico. But, like rivers do, it moved. In 1964, the U.S. finally gave back 437 acres of land.

 

Ever since Texas became a state, the river has been the border between the two countries. But rivers can move — and that's exactly what happened in 1864, when torrential rains caused it to jump its banks and go south. Suddenly the border was in a different place, and Texas had gained 700 acres of land called the Chamizal (pronounced chah-mee-ZAHL), so named for a type of plant that grew there.

 

Tags: Mexico, migration, borders, political, place, podcast.   


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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 4, 2014 1:12 PM

This article highlights one of the problems of tying political boundaries to the physical environment. When the Rio Grande moved further south it was in the United States' favor, and they happily accepted the extra land, despite the complaints of Mexico. It wasn't until 100 years later when the US feared the potential of Mexico straying during the Cold War that they decided to handle the issue. This shows some of the issues that can arise when placing rigid political definitions on the fluid and changing landscape.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 5, 2015 2:15 PM

This article is highly interesting because it shows just how "obnoxious" the concept of a border (a man made concept) actually is.  I found it interesting that the border could move that much due to the Rio Grande flooding.  It seems to me that it was a hasty decision on the part of the politicians who set the Rio Grande as the border between the United States and Mexico.  I also found it interesting that how in the 1960's, the United States forced people out of their homes when they were going to cede the land back to Mexico.  Because it was part of an effort to keep them allied with the US during the Cold War.  Also, it was highly interesting how the US built a cement casing around the river to keep it from moving.  Like Trillo says at the end of the article, "There's only so much control a man can do on a river. Sooner or later...the river is gonna do what Mother Nature has taught it to do — to move."

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 21, 2015 10:08 AM

I find this absolutely fascinating; I have never heard of a border moving in such a way! The implications that this deal had for the residents of that disputed territory show the power that geography can have both on global politics and much closer to home. I also find it astounding that the Rio Grande was able to shift that much over the course of only 100 years. One square mile is an awful lot of ground to cover when one thinks of rivers as being relatively stationary- do all rivers shift in such a manner, or is the Rio Grande more active than normal in this regard? And if so, why? I wonder if there are any similar examples in other parts of the world where the fluidity of geography has impacted political boundaries in such a way, as I feel as though this is the first time I've come across this particular kind of story. A fantastic read, I highly recommend it.

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Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty | McClatchy

Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty | McClatchy | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Some four decades after welcoming foreign assembly plants and factories, known as maquiladoras, Mexico has seen only a trickle of its industrial and factory workers join the ranks of those who even slightly resemble a middle class.

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