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Italy is a 'dying country' says minister as birth rate plummets

Italy is a 'dying country' says minister as birth rate plummets | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
New figures show the lowest total number of births since the formation of the modern Italian state


Fewer babies were born in Italy in 2014 than in any other year since the modern Italian state was formed in 1861, new data show, highlighting the demographic challenge faced by the country’s chronically sluggish economy.  National statistics office ISTAT said on Thursday the number of live births last year was 509,000, or 5,000 fewer than in 2013, rounding off half a century of decline.  The number of babies born to both natives and foreigners living in Italy dropped as immigration, which used to support the overall birth rate, tumbled to its lowest level for five years.


Tag: Italy, Europe, declining populations, population, demographic transition model.


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Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 7:52 PM

Summary: This article basically confirms the DTM. It talks about how because of Italy's wealth there population may cease to exist in the far future.

 

Insight: This article not only has a lot to do with the DTM, but it also analyzes several factors affecting population.

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 8:40 PM

Unit 2: 

Italy continues to round off half a century of declines in births. Recent statistics show that the countries birth rates are at the lowest rate they have been since the formation of the modern Italian state. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 11:53 AM

UNIT 2 POPULATION

This article is very informative on the current situation in Italy. Fewer babies were born in 2014 than in any other year since 1861, and this is said to be connected to the country's "sluggish economy". Immigration, a factor that previously contributed to the birth rate in Italy, has been at its lowest in five years. People in Italy are dying, and there are not enough births to balance out the country. As a result, the country is so called "dying". The government of Prime Minister Matteo Renzi is trying very hard boost the economy by reforming the labour market and trying to convince young adults to stay in Italy rather than working abroad. This whole conflict in Italy involves the promotion of population growth in a country, because the country is dying and needs a more stable population.

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Venice wants out of Italy

Venice wants out of Italy | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
VENICE, Italy – Venice, renowned for incomparable Gothic architecture and placid canals plied by gondolas that make it one of the most recognizable cities in the world, may have had enough of Italy.

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David Lizotte's curator insight, February 20, 12:48 PM

The Italian North, historically speaking was graced by the Industrial Revolution whereas the agricultural south never truly was. This is one of the reasons as to why Southern Italy has no money, there is simply no Industry. 

Throughout the 1800's Northern Italian States developed industry, going along with the rest of Western Europe. Being closer to the west certainly influenced this need of an industrial sector. Northern Italian provinces were also at once ruled by Napoleon, "The Kingdom of Italy" (1805-1814) thus having a share of western influence. In any case the Industrial Revolution reached Northern Italy. The production of war based machinery was developing throughout Europe, in case of another "Napoleon" like person. This created jobs, thus a fluctuation of money. This never reached the agrarian south. 

Southern Italy is not the only area to go untouched by Industry. Eastern Europe was very slow at developing and producing and it can be argued it still is. For example, look at Greece. It has very little industry and a horrid economy to complement it. Due to no industry/no money the North has to take care of the South with its taxes. Citizens of Northern Italy are getting tired of it and want to succeed. 

I understand why they want to succeed. But then what would happen with Southern Italy. It would just remain a tourist attraction with farmers scattered throughout the country side. It sounds nice but it probably isn't These people already have a low standard of living, Northern Italy succeeding would determine an even lower standard. 

A positive aspect of this article is that no one wants to bear arms over the issue. Its a peaceful movement, although there was a homemade tank made from a bulldozer, but still, its peaceful.  Could violence occur if not grow? Perhaps... if the economic loss is great enough to promote such an outcome. 

This article truly does pinpoint the fact that Italy is very much a divided country. The North claims they are a different people, a different identity. Perhaps its not just economic reasons but cultural aspects as well that generate the want of succession. In either case, both the economic and cultural reasonings are products of the Industrial Revolution gracing the North. 

Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 16, 3:03 PM

Nobody wants to feel like they're not in control and Venice is no different. Large money making cities or regions often try to break off from their states or countries. New York City has talked about becoming its own state (And with a population of 8.406 million as of 2013, it's bigger than some states) before defending that its taxes aren't going to it and that Albany isn't meeting its demands. Venice is in the same boat (dare I say gondola) and simply wants to have a little more autonomy like way back. Secession is a bold move to make and judging from the article, it seems as if it's not wanted by all and maybe just a little more interest in the region will be taken by the government. Sometimes making bold claims is all that's needed to get what you want.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 6, 9:58 PM

Venice is to Italy as Italy is to Venice.  I imagine it will stay this way forever.  I think if there are wealthy people who want to see the split happen then it will.  But just because a group want a movement started, it won't happen.  I imagine Venice will see a few more concessions in the future if this problem persists.