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▶ How Many Countries Are There? - YouTube

Discuss this video: http://www.reddit.com/r/CGPGrey/comments/1p2m6g/how_many_countries_are_there/ Help support videos like this: http://www.cgpgrey.com/subba...

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What constitutes a "state?"  Watch this video and make a determination.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, February 8, 2014 5:38 PM

state or not a state? Good for the Political unint

Annie Pack's curator insight, June 25, 2014 1:10 PM

Country or not?? Interesting/confusing question! 

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Cities with the widest gap between rich, poor

Cities with the widest gap between rich, poor | ap human geography | Scoop.it
Based on the Gini coefficient, a measure that captures the level of income distribution in a given area, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the 20 metropolitan areas with the most uneven income distribution, or the highest Gini coefficients. A Gini coefficient of 1 means all income belongs to a single individual, while a coefficient of 0 reflects a perfectly even distribution. The Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut, metro area leads the nation with the worst income distribution.With only a few exceptions, the metro areas with the widest gaps between rich and poor residents tend to have lower median household incomes. The majority of the 20 metro areas with the highest Gini coefficients have median household incomes more than $10,000 below the national median of $52,250.Average incomes, however, tell a different story. Because of the uneven income distribution, the average income is much higher in most of these metro areas.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 13, 2015 8:48 AM

The Gini index which measures the degree of economic inequality (the Gini coefficient was added to the APHG course content for the Industrialization and Economic Development unit in 2013).  This article explains the value of the Gini coefficient without delving much into the statistics.  


Tagsstatistics, APHG, poverty, socioeconomic, development, economic.

Chelsea Martines's curator insight, August 29, 2015 2:21 PM

The article discusses the gaps between high income families and low income families in cities. This is mesured by what is called Gini coefficient and look so at a city's amount of poverty and wealthy people. The average income of a city is different and does not tell the imbalance between the high and low income families. It makes a city with a big divider in the two extremes not noticeable because ito makes the city look all around wealthy because of the weight of the higher income people. The Gini coefficient is different and shows that either there is a large majority of families that are wealthy in a city or of low income. Statistics for this have risen over the past decade dramatically since 2007. 

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2015 Human Development Report

2015 Human Development Report | ap human geography | Scoop.it
2015 Human Development Report

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Great resource for Development. 

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, February 15, 5:26 PM

Great resource for Development. 

Christopher L. Story's curator insight, March 31, 9:27 PM

Great resource for Development. 

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Why do competitors open their stores next to one another? - Jac de Haan

View full lesson on ed.ted.com - http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-do-competitors-open-their-stores-next-to-one-another-jac-de-haan Why are all the ga

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The Atlas of Economic Complexity: the Case of Costa Rica

The Atlas of Economic Complexity: the Case of Costa Rica | ap human geography | Scoop.it

"Understanding global trade and economic data can feel overwhelming, but fortunately there are online tools that help us to visualize complex economic data. The data in these charts was incredibly easy to gather, thanks to the Atlas of Economic Complexity."


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Before these tools existed, my first observations of economic geography and industrial development came when I left the US and was living in Central America.  I wrote this article to use the example of the shifts in the Costa Rican economy to demonstrate how to use the Atlas of Economic Complexity (which uses complicated data, but super easy to use).  


Tags: industry, development, statistics, economic, Costa Rica.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 14, 2015 3:12 PM

Before these tools existed, my first observations of economic geography and industrial development came when I left the US and was living in Central America.  I wrote this article to use the example of the shifts in the Costa Rican economy to demonstrate how to use the Atlas of Economic Complexity (which uses complicated data, but super easy to use).  


Tagsindustry, development, statistics, economic, Costa Rica.

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Visualizing the Global Economy

Visualizing the Global Economy | ap human geography | Scoop.it
The graphic above (Voronoi diagram) represents the relative size of each country’s economy in terms of nominal GDP: the larger the area, the larger the size of the economy. The areas are further divided into three sectors: services, industrial, and agricultural. The US economy is mostly composed of companies engaged in providing services (79.7% compared to the global average of 63.6%), while agriculture and industry make up smaller-than-average of portions of the economy (1.12% and 19.1% compared to averages of 5.9% and 30.5%).

 

Tags: globalization, industry, economic, visualization.


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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, March 1, 2:21 PM
VISUALIZANDO LA ECONOMÍA GLOBAL
Ivan Ius's curator insight, March 4, 10:18 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Patterns & Trends; Interrelationships
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, March 8, 11:39 PM
Quem e como está dentro?! 
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Favela Landscapes

"This gallery has a fantastic set of images showing Brazil’s poor squatter settlements-the favelas."

 

See the cultural landscape of how millions live in a megacity.


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Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 2015 7:53 PM

It is interesting how the demographic pattern of Favela serve as the only option for the housing of the poor in Brazil. The lack of jobs and better opportunities force many families to build their houses in the heel of the mountains. However, these mountain based houses are faced with many severe problems involving electricity, sewage, and water. The city offers a lot of opportunities for everyone, except for the poor who are the most in need. Transportation is another issue for these impoverished communities. It takes a lot of time to go up and down from these favelas, and becomes difficult for those that live on the highest peaks. Another important concern is drugs and crime rates that make these poor neighborhood dangerous in which to reside. Favelas are typical houses in the Brazil, which has the highest percentage of poverty out of all South American countries. In the meantime, favela will continue to serve as the permanent residencies of those too poor to afford housing in the Brazilian urban landscape.

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Envisioning the urban skyscraper of 2050

Envisioning the urban skyscraper of 2050 | ap human geography | Scoop.it
A high-rise for a warming and overpopulated Earth.

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Colleen Blankenship's insight:

Moving upward rather than outward and becoming greener and self-sustaining...is this the future of urban dwelling?

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, February 27, 2013 10:58 AM

Moving upward rather than outward and becoming greener and self-sustaining...is this the future of urban dwelling?

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | ap human geography | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:40 PM

These visuals really help to show that the size of a city doesn't necessarily correspond with it's population. Many years ago the trend was the larger the city in turn it would posses a larger population than a physically smaller city. Today this no longer holds true, in fact many smaller cities vastly out populate large sprawling cities. Most of these mega-cities in Asia and Latin America are incredibly over build and densely packed surrounded by miles of slums. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:16 PM

Pretty cool.

 

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Watch This Video & You’ll Never Eat McDonald’s French Fries Again

Watch This Video & You’ll Never Eat McDonald’s French Fries Again | ap human geography | Scoop.it

Michael Pollan is an author, activist, journalist and professor of journalism at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. He mainly focuses on the industrial food chain with regards to his research. He emphasizes how cooking is one of the simplest and most important steps people can take to improve their family’s health, build communities, help fix our broken food system and perhaps most importantly, break our growing dependence on corporations.


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Animal Care--Taking the Mystery Out of Pork Production at Smithfield Foods

Animal care is central to the success of both Smithfield Foods and our hog production subsidiary Murphy-Brown. Without healthy pigs, we can't produce high qu...

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, January 2, 10:29 AM

Raising pigs from the mass production point of view.

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40 maps that explain food in America

40 maps that explain food in America | ap human geography | Scoop.it

ExceThe future of the nations will depend on the manner of how they feed themselves, wrote the French epicurean Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin in 1826. Almost 200 years later, how nations feed themselves has gotten a lot more complicated. That’s particularly true in the US, where food insecurity coexists with an obesity crisis, where fast food is everywhere and farmer’s markets are spreading, where foodies have never had more power and McDonald’s has never had more locations, and where the possibility of a barbecue-based civil war is always near. So here are 40 maps, charts, and graphs that show where our food comes from and how we eat it, with some drinking thrown in for good measure.


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, January 10, 2:29 PM

Excellent current and historical maps for food and agricultural production. Great for the Ag Unit

Alex Smiga's curator insight, February 13, 12:03 PM

Edible maps.

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Gendering Agriculture | Africa Renewal Online

Gendering Agriculture | Africa Renewal Online | ap human geography | Scoop.it

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, January 10, 4:29 PM

Women in Agriculture - African women are highlighted in this Special Edition article, Gendering Agriculture

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 12:03 PM

unit 5

Women in Agriculture - African women are highlighted in this Special Edition article, Gendering Agriculture

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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | ap human geography | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:00 PM

Educating in poverty

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:20 AM

This video shows the place matters; a Washington D.C. educator shows how food deserts and other spatial problems of poverty impact his students on a daily basis.  We usually look at life expectancy data at the national scale and that obscures some of the real issues of poverty in developed countries.  Above is a map that shows the Gini index which measures the degree of economic inequality (the Gini coefficient was recently added to the APHG course content for the Industrialization and Economic Development unit).  Here are some maps and data from the World Bank that utilizes the Gini Index as well as an interactive Gapminder graph.  


Tags: industry, location, place, migration, APHG, poverty, socioeconomic.

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As Women Take Over a Male-Dominated Field, the Pay Drops - NYTimes.com

As Women Take Over a Male-Dominated Field, the Pay Drops - NYTimes.com | ap human geography | Scoop.it

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Share your insight
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 20, 12:54 PM
Share your insight
Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 5:33 PM
unit 6
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Creative Destruction

Creative Destruction | ap human geography | Scoop.it
It's much worse than people realize.

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The relatively recent decline of music industry, as well as the newspaper industry, are good examples to teach the concept of creative destruction.  As jobs are created through new emerging technologies, older jobs will be rendered obsolete and be 'destroyed.'  While many bemoan the loss of particular jobs as regrettable, it is a part of globalization of economic geography that as jobs are created with new technologies, other jobs disappear.  Indoor plumbing meant the death of the water-carrying guilds (while I might be sad they lost their jobs, I'm keeping my plumbing).  The trick is to make these transitions smooth and to prepare the labor force to have skills that the new economy will demand so that individual families and workers aren't casualties of this 'creative destruction' process.     


Tags:  economic, labor, globalization, unit 6 industry.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, March 30, 2015 9:13 AM

Creative destruction may sound like an oxymoron—as sometimes our linguistic creativity is capable of doing, in spite of what certain expressions really mean when looked at closely ("near miss," "wireless fiber")—because it is. Yet in our minds, it makes sense, and that seems to be enough. The problem with "creative" destruction is that the creative side speaks of the "winners" and "destruction" of the losers. So we are up against a "win-lose" situation. The ultimate loss appears when we, while being creative, lose our human traits; the true measure of any technology's positive—or negative–effect on our well being beyond the merely material.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, March 31, 2015 7:48 AM

We are becoming obsolete as a Charlie Chaplin film, perpetuate the grace of the silent film as the industry is all forward-talkie.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:12 AM

The relatively recent decline of music industry, as well as the newspaper industry, are good examples to teach the concept of creative destruction.  As jobs are created through new emerging technologies, older jobs will be rendered obsolete and be 'destroyed.'  While many bemoan the loss of particular jobs as regrettable, it is a part of globalization of economic geography that as jobs are created with new technologies, other jobs disappear.  Indoor plumbing meant the death of the water-carrying guilds (while I might be sad they lost their jobs, I'm keeping my plumbing).  The trick is to make these transitions smooth and to prepare the labor force to have skills that the new economy will demand so that individual families and workers aren't casualties of this 'creative destruction' process.     


Tags:  economic, labor, globalization, unit 6 industry.

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30 charts and maps that explain China today

30 charts and maps that explain China today | ap human geography | Scoop.it

"China's mind-boggling size, economy and history, visualized.""


Via Seth Dixon
Colleen Blankenship's insight:

This article is an enjoyable hodge-podge of maps, charts and graphs that collectively attempt to explain China's role the world today.  This is similar to, and complements this article which answers 7 question about China and the United States.  


Tags: economic, China, development.

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 3:20 PM

China's rise over the past few decades has been truly remarkable, and, while expected to slow down, should continue as we progress further into the 21st century. Historically, China has been one of the largest economies in the world, so this recent growth is more of a return to the norm rather than a new development, as many Americans may perceive it. There are a number of factors at play that have lead to China's resurgence, and this article does a very good job of breaking it down into a series of easily-digested images. Having lifted 500 million people out of poverty via its development, China today is still a highly stratified society, with many inhabitants of the interior provinces continuing to live without any of the benefits being enjoyed along the coast. China serves as the world's "middle class," but much work remains to be done for the average Chinese citizen to enjoy the standard of living that we are accustomed to in the West. In the meantime, however, China is a force in the global economy, and will continue to expand and rival the US.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 8:06 AM

These charts are fantastic at explaining the impact that china is having on the world. their economy is massive, and they tend to use a massive amount of global resources. it also amazes me how big their population is.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:05 AM

This article is an enjoyable hodge-podge of maps, charts and graphs that collectively attempt to explain China's role the world today.  This is similar to, and complements this article which answers 7 question about China and the United States.  


Tags: economic, China, development.

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“A Short History of the Highrise”

“A Short History of the Highrise” | ap human geography | Scoop.it
Watch a four-part interactive documentary about the fascinating past, present and future of high-rise living in cities around the world.

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Chinese Architecture, Old and New: A Photo Essay

Chinese Architecture, Old and New: A Photo Essay | ap human geography | Scoop.it

The growth of China's massive population has slowed in recent years, but migration to urban areas has increased, with almost half of China's 1.3 billion people living in or near cities. A booming economy, government housing initiatives, infrastructure programs, and private real estate speculation have all driven construction to record levels. New apartment, office, and government buildings regularly rise up over older neighborhoods, and thousands have relocated to modern housing complexes. The blend of old and new Chinese architecture is ever-present in cities and villages, as older buildings are torn down and newer ones built at ever faster rates.-The Atlantic

 

Out with the old, in with the new!  These are great photographs of China's new architectural style that is rapidly replacing its traditional one, making room for its millions who are constantly flocking towards urban life and the hope of opportunity - if they can afford it.-AA


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“A Short History of the Highrise”

“A Short History of the Highrise” | ap human geography | Scoop.it
Watch a four-part interactive documentary about the fascinating past, present and future of high-rise living in cities around the world.

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There Are Cities In Russia That No One Is Allowed To Go To

There Are Cities In Russia That No One Is Allowed To Go To | ap human geography | Scoop.it
They are Russia’s ‘closed cities’, a hangover from the Soviet Union when the then government went to extreme lengths to conceal locations of strategic importance.
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This Funny World Map Shows What Every Country Leads The World In - Eye Opening Info

This Funny World Map Shows What Every Country Leads The World In - Eye Opening Info | ap human geography | Scoop.it
A wonderful map created by William Samari, Ray Yamartino, and Rafaan Anvari of DogHouseDiares illustrates what every country does better than every other country. They collected the information from various sources and sprinkled in some quirkier rankings since many countries led the world in multiple things.

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dilaycock's curator insight, March 18, 2014 3:03 AM

Just for fun (although some of the info is serious). 

Tracey M Benson's curator insight, March 18, 2014 4:42 PM

Australia: deadly animals and melanoma = great!

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These remarkable floating farms could help feed hungry people around the world.

These remarkable floating farms could help feed hungry people around the world. | ap human geography | Scoop.it
Not enough land? Try farming on water.
Colleen Blankenship's insight:

The idea of floating farms seems to be one worth pursuing.  However, we must remember that it is often the distribution of the food that is produced that is problematic.

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Farmers Feed the World (Watch Me, Hit the Quan, Uptown Funk Parody)

CLICK HERE TO WATCH ALL OF OUR PARODIES: https://goo.gl/DC3Wqj Website: http://www.petersonfarmbros.com Twitter: @gregpeterson33 @npete16 @kmerle7 Facebook: ...

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, January 2, 6:06 PM

This one of the series by these bros about farming takes a geographic look at crops some of which are outside the US. Great intro to the Ag Unit

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Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) - Myths and Truths

The information is based on the new report "GMO Myths and Truths" by EarthOpenSource.org. You can find more information here: http://earthopensource.org/inde...

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, January 10, 3:08 PM

This is produced by Earth Open Source organization as a political add for a California initiative. It gives the opposite view of the BASFA video.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, February 13, 12:06 PM

The other side of the GMO issue