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Western manners: The latest Chinese status symbol

Western manners: The latest Chinese status symbol | ap human geography | Scoop.it

What can seem to an outsider as impolite today — such as pushing, queue barging, speaking loudly or picking your nose in public — is common behaviour for the majority of Chinese. But as China opens up and engages with the world awareness is growing among the population on how they are being perceived overseas.

 

To disassociate themselves from this reputation, many of the new elite are seeking refinement at etiquette schools. At the same time, they are looking to good manners as a new form of status symbol.  “It’s mostly learning about how to behave in an international environment."


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The Dakota Access Pipeline Map

The Dakota Access Pipeline Map | ap human geography | Scoop.it

"Thousands of Native Americans and their allies have gathered on unceded Sioux land delimited by the 1851 Treaty of Fort Laramie to try and stand in the way of the “black snake” that could poison the Standing Rock Reservation’s water supply. Many have noted that the pipeline corridor was repositioned from its original route north of Bismarck after white citizens spoke up against the threat a spill would pose to their drinking water ― a threat duly recognized by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Yet the Corps failed its federal mandate for meaningful consultation with the Standing Rock Tribe before signing off on a route that moved the pipeline to their doorstep."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 3, 9:29 AM

Maps can tell truths, and maps can be used to obscure other truths. Creating a map, choosing what data to include (and exclude) is an inherently political act.  Maps have the power to convey geographic perspectives that might otherwise be muted.

 

Tags: industryconflict, economic, energy, resources, environmentindigenous, ecology.

Liz Caughlin's curator insight, November 4, 12:03 PM
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Crash Course Human Geography Preview

Starting next week, Miriam Nielsen will be teaching Human Geography on Crash Course. We'll talk about what Human Geography isn't, and what it is. Let's tal
Colleen Blankenship's insight:
Great explanation of human geography overall!  Stay tuned for more episodes!
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Photos that bear witness to modern slavery

Photos that bear witness to modern slavery | ap human geography | Scoop.it
For the past two years, photographer Lisa Kristine has traveled the world, documenting the unbearably harsh realities of modern-day slavery. She shares hauntingly beautiful images -- miners in the Congo, brick layers in Nepal -- illuminating the plight of the 27 million souls enslaved worldwide. (Filmed at TEDxMaui)

Via Matthew Wahl
Colleen Blankenship's insight:
The visuals are a commanding reminder that the world still faces the dilemma of slavery on many levels, in many countries, and involving all age and gender groups!
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Matthew Wahl's curator insight, March 15, 2014 7:27 AM

...an extremely powerful view of trafficing in the developing world.

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The Growth of Megacities

The Growth of Megacities | ap human geography | Scoop.it

"For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments.

 

The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers.

 

A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, economic and environmental problems associated with a predominantly urbanized population are considerably different from those of the mostly rural world population of the past."


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Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:48 PM

The majority of megacities are in the developing world, with the exception of places like New York and Tokyo, best showing how the face of the world is changing. Developing countries are on their paths to becoming major powers, such as Calkutta for example. As an enlarging city, more and more citizens are flocking to the abundance of jobs in the city which thus increases India's development as a result of the growing city and thus leads to a cycle of growth as demand for more jobs increases as the city grows. Megacities are thus a symbol of the developing world and can be used in human geography as symbols of development. 

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:08 AM

mega cities

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 12:06 PM
unit 7
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The Best News You Don’t Know

The Best News You Don’t Know | ap human geography | Scoop.it
I’ve covered massacres in South Sudan, concentration camps in Myanmar and widespread stunting in India, but it’s also important to acknowledge the backdrop of global progress. Otherwise, the public may perceive poverty as hopeless and see no point in carrying on the fight — at just the point when we’re making the most rapid gains ever recorded.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 25, 3:37 PM

The world is winning the war on extreme poverty, but most Americans think that poverty is getting worse. Doom and gloom can dominate media coverage because a horrific tragedy gets better rating than slow incremental improvements.  The general public is often ignorant of the measurable improvements going on in the world today.  No, the world isn’t perfect, but it is getting better. 

 

Tags: mediapoverty, development, economic, perspective.

Sally Egan's curator insight, October 6, 9:36 PM
This article provides a positive look at the advances made in global development measures.
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Hurricane Matthew-Humanitarian Mapping

Hurricane Matthew-Humanitarian Mapping | ap human geography | Scoop.it

"The Humanitarian OpenSteetMap Team (HOT) has activated to provide geographic base data in areas affected by Hurricane Matthew. Category 4 Hurricane Matthew continues to strengthen and is advancing on Haiti and the Bahamas. Hurricane Matthew is expected to cause 'catastrophic' damage including extreme flooding and landslides potentially affecting millions in Haiti, Jamaica, and Bahamas. To start we are mapping coastal communities in the storm path."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 7, 12:21 PM

Want to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are most vulnerable to natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets.  My students and I are working on this over the weekend; can you join in and help?  The projects that are marked urgent by the Red Cross are all in Haiti right now.  Here are is a video playlist that explains the project and how you can help if you are new to OpenStreetMap (OSM).

 

Tags: disasters, mappingSTEM, physicalHaiti, weather and climate.

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France’s ‘Burkini’ Bans Are About More Than Religion or Clothing

France’s ‘Burkini’ Bans Are About More Than Religion or Clothing | ap human geography | Scoop.it
The bans on full-body swimsuits are not primarily about protecting Muslim women from patriarchy, but about shielding France’s non-Muslims from a changing world.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, August 19, 7:17 AM
France has fiercely protected many aspects of its culture. In a globalized world, is this creating a centripetal or centrifugal force, or both for them?
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Over 40s 'have more babies' than under 20s

Over 40s 'have more babies' than under 20s | ap human geography | Scoop.it
Women in their forties are having more babies than women two decades younger for the first time in nearly 70 years, official figures for England and Wales show.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, August 9, 8:20 PM
Population trends are changing as women enter the work force.
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All the World’s Immigration Visualized in 1 Map

All the World’s Immigration Visualized in 1 Map | ap human geography | Scoop.it
This map shows the estimated net immigration (inflows minus outflows) by origin and destination country between 2010 and 2015. Blue circles = positive net migration (more inflows). Red circles = negative net migration (more outflows). Each yellow dot represents 1,000 people. Hover over a circle to see that country’s total net migration between 2010 and 2015. […]

Via Nancy Watson
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Read and scroll all the way down for all the information and maps! Pay attention to the blue circles which represent more inflow of migration and red circles which represent more outflows.  Hover over the circles for more information!
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Remembering September 11th

"Video and Photographs of the event. All media is from the internet and not my own. I compiled all media from the internet and edited them together to tell the story of the deadliest attack on America."


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Because many students were not born when 9/11 occurred, or don't remember, it is important to have sources like this available.  Take a moment and look at this information about this time in U.S. history.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 3:14 PM

The compilation above was created by a teacher who realized that now none of his students were alive to remember how emotional it was for people to watch the horrific news unfold.  Additionally, this video of how Canadians helped the U.S. paired with this lesson plan from the Choices Program will help students explore the human dimension of the September 11 attacks as will this lesson from Teaching History. For a geospatial perspective on 9/11, this page from the Library of Congress, hosted by the Geography and Map Division is a visually rich resources (aerial photography, thermal imagery, LiDAR, etc.)  that show the extent of the damage and the physical change to the region that the terrorist attacks brought.  The images from that day are a part of American memory and change how the event is remembered and memorialized in public spaces (if you want a touching story of heroism, the Red Bandana is moving). 

 
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AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa | ap human geography | Scoop.it
Despite the gains, more Africans still die from Malaria even as the spotlight remains firmly fixed on HIV/AIDS.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:41 AM

This infographic shows how pervasive disease is in Africa. Though HIV gets a lot of attention, malaria and tuberculosis are just as prevalent as HIV/AIDS. The attention given to HIV/AIDS is reflected in the amount of aid sent to Africa, with a significant amount more being spent to halt the spread of HIV. These efforts are not entirely in vain as there have been decreases for all three diseases, but the funding necessary to make serious progress not on its way.

 

Though there is an even greater need to fight malaria, more international aid for HIV/AIDS is likely because most of the countries sending aid are not as familiar with malaria and HIV/AIDS has become sensationalized.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:52 PM

Disease is a global problem. Not having enough resources to keep diseases such as malaria out of Africa is unfortunate. People are dying every day and in efforts to save these people, it still can't be done. In the past, AIDS was the main disease that killed people in Africa. More recently, malaria is working its way through humans and killing them more than AIDS.

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, July 4, 2014 7:41 AM

Fantastic infographic on health risks in Africa. Particular focus on infectious diseases.

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McDonald's International

McDonald's International | ap human geography | Scoop.it

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:45 PM

We talk about McDonalds as a way of Americanizing the rest of the world. These foods show that it may still be the case but local culture is still infused and desired where McDonalds expands to.

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, January 21, 2015 9:40 PM

This shows that mmcdonals is a global industy . there are many mcdonalds everywhere they put a spin oncertain diishes to match their heritage like in japan instead of hamburger meat like we americans use the use crabs.It just really shows how far mcdonalds was changed from just starting in america to being featured all over the globe

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:06 PM

I've lived and traveled to a few places especially Asia.  I've had the Ramen at McD's in Hawaii along with the Portugeuse sausage that comes with the big breakfast.  I've also experienced Japanese McD's.  It was nice to be able to find some of the regular food like a burger and fry at any McD's in the world, but I never ordered anything else. 

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What to Know About Diwali, the Festival of Lights

What to Know About Diwali, the Festival of Lights | ap human geography | Scoop.it

"Diwali, one of the biggest holidays in Indian culture, is a five-day festival of lights celebrated worldwide by Hindus, Sikhs and Jains. This year, the traditional day of Diwali falls on Oct. 30, though celebrations span the entire week leading up to and following the holiday, which marks the triumph of good over evil."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 31, 4:51 PM

This video provides a good introduction to the incredibly important South Asia holiday of Diwali. 

 

Tags: culture, India, Hinduism, South Asia, festivals.

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Election maps are telling you big lies about small things

Election maps are telling you big lies about small things | ap human geography | Scoop.it
In 2012, 160 counties cast about the same number of votes as the rest of the country. But, your run-of-the-mill election map won't show you that.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 2, 10:42 AM

This is nothing new to most visitors to this site, but every four years we have a wonderful teaching moment to show how population density can change our interpretation of a map and the meaning of the data embedded in that map.  In preparation for next week, this article for the Washington Post as well as this one from the New York Times should help get students be better prepared for the onslaught of maps that we know are right around the corner, to properly assess and contextualize the geographic content in these maps.     

 

Tags: electoral, political, mapping.

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Here’s Everyone Who’s Immigrated to the U.S. Since 1820

Here’s Everyone Who’s Immigrated to the U.S. Since 1820 | ap human geography | Scoop.it
From 1820 to 2013, 79 million people obtained lawful permanent resident status in the United States. The interactive map below visualizes all of them based on their prior country of residence. The brightness of a country corresponds to its total migration to the U.S. at the given time. Use the controls at the bottom to stop / […]
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This article links to the other article on this Scoop It on immigration movement around the globe.  Be sure to look at the changing chart of "Top Countries" of immigration to the United States and the connection to history.  What would really be interesting would be to see the emigration from the United States!
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Bye-Bye, Baby

Bye-Bye, Baby | ap human geography | Scoop.it
Birthrates are falling around the world. And that’s O.K.

 

Why do commentators, like Chicken Little, treat this worldwide trend as a disaster, even collective suicide? It could be because declines in fertility rates stir anxieties about power: national, military and economic, as well as sexual. In reality, slower population growth creates enormous possibilities for human flourishing. In an era of irreversible climate change and the lingering threat from nuclear weapons, it is simply not the case that population equals power, as so many leaders have believed throughout history. Lower fertility isn’t entirely a function of rising prosperity and secularism; it is nearly universal.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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After reading this article, do you agree or disagree?  Remember, be specific with your arguments.
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Sally Egan's curator insight, April 9, 2014 6:44 PM

Challenges the ideas about the impacts of declining birth rates across the world. Contains interesting graphs of changing Fertility rates from 1950 for the highest and lowest GDP nations. Relevant to Population Geography. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 2:18 PM

The dwindling birth rates may be seen as negative to some in a sense of power insecurities, but the reality is that it is great for economic growth and prevents population issues. With high birth rates, movement tends to be higher towards immigration while low birth rates mainly have movement towards urban spaces.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:35 PM

Unit 2

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Why babies all over the world are now sleeping in boxes

Why babies all over the world are now sleeping in boxes | ap human geography | Scoop.it
The Finnish baby box, which the state has given to expectant mothers for 75 years, has sparked copycat boxes across the globe.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 3, 9:02 PM

A few years back I shared a delightful article that demonstrated how the Finnish baby box lead to the Finland having the best infant mortality rates in the world.  This first article itself is the story now.  This great BBC article with geographic themes took hold and the act of this article getting shared around the world inspired similar initiatives--this type of diffusion shows layers and layers of good geography present in this viral phenonomen. 

 

Tags: Finland, medical, media, population, demographic transition model, unit 2 population, technology, diffusion.

thefacemasterz's curator insight, April 12, 10:23 AM
best bridal makeup in lucknow http://www.thefacemasterz.com/
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Getting Japanese Citizenship

Getting Japanese Citizenship | ap human geography | Scoop.it

"To become a Japanese citizen, a foreigner must display 'good conduct', among other things. The rules do not specify what that means, and make no mention of living wafu (Japanese-style). But for one candidate, at least, it involved officials looking in his fridge and inspecting his children’s toys to see if he was Japanese enough (he was). Bureaucratic discretion is the main reason why it is hard to get Japanese nationality. The ministry of justice, which handles the process, says officials may visit applicants’ homes and talk to their neighbors."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 13, 3:04 PM

Japan has a remarkably homogeneous population, in large part because they have very tight immigration laws (here is a more extended list of the requirements to obtain a Japanese citizenship).

 

Questions to Ponder: How is the notion of Japanese citizenship different from American citizenship?  As Japan's population continues to decline, how might that change Japan's migration/citizenship policies?   

 

Tags: JapanEast Asia, place, perspective, cultural norms, culture.

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Why Malthus Is Still Wrong

Why Malthus Is Still Wrong | ap human geography | Scoop.it
Why Malthus makes for bad science policy

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 6, 9:53 AM

The ideas of Thomas Malthus have always loomed large; the scope includes some of the biggest issues facing humanity's continued existence on this planet.  His controversial ideas have been debated and inspired some policies that were especially damaging.  This anti-Malthusian op-ed was written by the Publisher of Skeptic Magazine; I typically pair this with the neo-Malthusian op-ed written by the  President of the Canada's Population institute.  Comparing and contrasting the merits of these articles provides a way to get student to assess the strengths of an argument and to identify the bias/perspective of the author.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 

 

Tagsop-ed, demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population

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Gary Johnson Vows to Get Tough on East Korea - The New Yorker

Gary Johnson Vows to Get Tough on East Korea - The New Yorker | ap human geography | Scoop.it
Andy Borowitz jokingly reports that the Libertarian Presidential candidate Gary Johnson has vowed to support West Korea and get tough on East Korea.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 29, 8:39 PM
This is why we need Human Geography as a required subject. 
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Two Centuries of US Immigration Visualized - StumbleUpon


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Looking at this map you should be able to see the "waves" of immigration corresponding to the years that they occurred.
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Why Italy’s 'Fertility Day' is backfiring

Why Italy’s 'Fertility Day' is backfiring | ap human geography | Scoop.it

"Facing a low fertility rate (1.4), Italy is holding its first 'Fertility Day' on Sept. 22, which will emphasize 'the beauty of motherhood and fatherhood' and host roundtable discussions on fertility and reproductive health. That may seem inoffensive, but the country’s health department is trying to raise awareness with an ad campaign that’s striking many as misguided and, worse, sexist and alarmist."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 2, 8:47 AM

This pro-natalist campaign designed by the health ministry has received near universal criticism (in an attempt to see other perspectives, I searched for a more positive or even neutral article on the topic and came up empty-handed).  Italy's Prime Minister openly scoffed at the premise of the campaign, and many pundits argue that it shames and pressures women into thinking about personal choices of childbearing as if they were communal responsibilities.  Unlike the infamous 'Do it For Denmark' advertisements that were filled with playful innuendos, or Singapore's 'Maybe Baby' which highlights the joys of parenthood, this one has more overtones of duty and plays on fear more than those other pro-natalist campaigns.      

 

Tags:  ItalyEurope, declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 5, 7:28 AM
Preliminary - population
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The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation

The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation | ap human geography | Scoop.it
The Gangnam Style! sensation is all over the internet, complete with parodies that both honor and mock the original.  This first video is the original, which in a few short months received well ove...

 

The following link has the video, parodies and infographics to help student explore the meaning behind the cultural phenomenon. 


Questions to Ponder: Considering the concept of cultural diffusion, what do we make of this phenomenon? What cultural combinations are seen in this? How has the technological innovations changed how cultures interact, spread and are replicated?

 

Tags: popular culture, video, diffusion, globalization, culture, place, technology, unit 3 culture. 


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Rich's comment, October 3, 2012 2:27 PM
When I first saw this music video and heard the song I remember myself saying "I have no idea what is going on, but the human race is a better place thanks to this guy." I may not know what he is saying but it puts me in a great mood. This guy is breaking cultural and geographical boundaries with music.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2014 6:07 PM

Culture and globalization has spread this song across the United States breaking records and trending on sites such as Twitter. Our exposure to different cultures is great. However, if you do not like songs that get stuck in your head, do not listen to this song . LOL

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Do You Live In IHOP America Or Waffle House America?

Do You Live In IHOP America Or Waffle House America? | ap human geography | Scoop.it

There is a pretty ridiculous North-South split, although Maryland, northern Virginia, and southern Florida (which is pretty much the North anyways) fall into pancake territory, while Waffle House has made inroads into Ohio and Indiana.


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Hye-Hyun Kang's curator insight, January 9, 2014 11:35 PM

This article basically shows that South prefer waffles than pancakes. Although, there's very small part of Texas that prefers waffles over pancakes. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 1:13 PM

This map shows how divided north and south are in terms of Pancakes and waffles, with Pancakes having a larger reach than waffles, and showing how regional differences are effected by something as odd as fast food.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 10:05 PM

I have never been to a Waffle House and I hate IHOP. I chose this article because the map popped out at me. It was like an IHOP take over with a poor Waffle House in the middle. However, it is interesting to see that when you open the article, the IHOP density comes out to  1,543, while Waffle House density comes out to 1,661. By looking at this map, you would think that IHOP would have the bigger density. Waffle House gets most of its business from states in the South, while IHOP seems to be all over the place, Northern and Southern states.